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Roman Provincial Coins

The Roman Empire allowed many areas and cities to mint coins for local use, those coins are refered to as Roman Provincial or Greek Imperial coins. All the coins listed below are also listed under the emperor in power at the time of mintage. If you are looking for coins of a specific emperor, use the menu on the left. If you are looking for coins from a specific region, these coins are organized geographically under Greek Imperial in our Greek Coins catalog. The link to the Greek Coins catalog is in the header above. In this folder all provincial coins are listed from most expensive to least expensive. Start on page one to see the best or on the last page to find the bargains.


Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D., Sestos, Thracian Chersonesos

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Sestos was an ancient town of the Thracian Chersonesos, the modern Gallipoli peninsula in European Turkey. Situated on the Hellespont opposite Abydos, it was an Aeolian colony, founded by settlers from Lesbos, and the home of Hero in the legend of Hero and Leander.
CM89992. Bronze AE 18, RPC I 1740 (2 spec.; RPC online 6 spec., 2 with c/m), Varbanov III 2967 (R7); c/m: Howqego 460 (1 spec., same coin type, same placement), VF, tight flan, reverse a bit flattened opposite countermark, weight 3.485 g, maximum diameter 17.6 mm, die axis 0o, Sestos mint, obverse CEBACTOY, bare head right, countermark: six pointed star in a 7mm round punch; reverse CHCTI, lyre; very rare; $180.00 (€158.40)


Philippi, Macedonia, 41 - 68 A.D.

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This coin has traditionally been attributed to Augustus, but due to its copper composition, RPC attributes it as likely from Claudius to Nero; Philippi probably did not issue copper coins during the reign of Augustus.
RP92634. Bronze AE 19, RPC I 1651, SNG ANS 674, SNG Cop 305, Varbanov III 3229, BMC Macedonia 23, AMNG III 14, Choice VF, round flan, brown tone, some porosity, light deposits, weight 4.024 g, maximum diameter 18.6 mm, die axis 180o, Philippi (near Filippoi, Greece) mint, 41 - 68 A.D.; obverse Victory standing left on base, raising wreath in right hand, palm frond in left hand over left shoulder, VIC - AVG divided across field; reverse COHOR PRAE, three standards, PHIL in exergue; $60.00 (€52.80)


Maximinus I Thrax, 20 March 235 - Late May 238 A.D., Pella, Macedonia

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Pella was founded in 399 B.C. by King Archelaus (413 - 399 B.C.) as his capital. It is best known as the historical capital of the ancient Greek kingdom of Macedon and birthplace of Alexander the Great. In 168 B.C., it was sacked by the Romans, and its treasury transported to Rome. Later the city was destroyed by an earthquake. By 180 A.D., Lucian could describe it in passing as "now insignificant, with very few inhabitants."
RP92878. Bronze AE 26, Varbanov III 3747 (R5); SNG Cop 285; Moushmov 6486; cf. BMC Macedonia p. 40, 40 (cuirassed bust); SNG ANS -; SNG Hunter -; AMNG III -, aVF, well centered, green patina, light deposits, light marks, part of reverse legend weak, weight 9.387 g, maximum diameter 25.7 mm, die axis 180o, Pella mint, 20 Mar 235 - late May 238 A.D.; obverse IMP C C IVL VER MAXIMINVS, laureate and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse COL IVL AVG PELLA, Pan seated left on rock, nude, right hand on top of head, pedum in left hand, syrnix (Pan flute) in left field ; $110.00 (€96.80)


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D., Nikopolis ad Istrum

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There are peculiarities about these Roman crescent and star reverse types that are difficult to understand. First, the crescents are almost always depicted with the horns up. The moon is never seen this way in the sky. Also, in the sky stars are never visible within the horns of the crescent moon because there they would be behind the shadowed yet solid and opaque orb. The crescent with horns up may represent a solar eclipse.
RP92881. Bronze assarion, H-H-J Nikopolis 8.14.48.37 (R2), Varbanov I 2474 var. (obv. leg.), AMNG I/I 1432, Moushmov 986, gVF, green patina, slightly off center, scratches, spot of corrosion on reverse, weight 2.928 g, maximum diameter 16.6 mm, die axis 180o, Nicopolis ad Istrum (Nikyup, Bulgaria) mint, 9 Apr 193 - 4 Feb 211 A.D.; obverse AY K Λ CEVHPOC, laureate head right; reverse NIKOΠOΛITΩN ΠPOC IC, five stars above and within crescent with horns upward; $80.00 (€70.40)


Geta, 209 - c. 26 December 211 A.D., Nikopolis ad Istrum, Moesia Inferior

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A star or stars within a crescent with horns up probably represents a solar eclipse.
RP92884. Bronze assarion, H-H-J Nikopolis 8.22.48.4 (R2), Varbanov I 3214 (R4), AMNG I/I 1646, Moushmov 1195, SNG Cop -, BMC Thrace -, VF, green patina, edge crack, reverse slightly off center, edge a little ragged, weight 3.056 g, maximum diameter 17.4 mm, die axis 0o, Nicopolis ad Istrum (Nikyup, Bulgaria) mint, as caesar, 198 - 209 A.D.; obverse Λ AYP KAI ΓETAC, draped bust right; reverse NIKOΠOΛITΩN ΠPOC I, five stars and crescent with horns up, three stars above, one star within, one star below; $90.00 (€79.20)


Heraclea Perinthos, Thrace, c. 180 - 196 A.D.

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Perinthos an ancient Ionian colony from Samos, was situated between Bisanthe and Selymbria, on the northern shore of the Propontis. Herakles was revered at Perinthos as oekist or founder. Perinthos is famous chiefly for its stubborn and successful resistance to Philip II of Macedon in 340 B.C.; at that time it seems to have been more important than Byzantium itself. In Roman times it was called Heraclea Thraciae (or Heraclea Perinthus). Today it is Marmara Ereglisi in the European part of Turkey.
GB89881. Bronze AE 21, CN Online Perinthos CN_2198; Schönert Perinthos 202; Lindgren -; SNG Cop -; BMC Thrace -, aVF, tight flan, tight flan, obverse legend mostly unstruck or off flan, weight 7.140 g, maximum diameter 21.4 mm, die axis 225o, Heraclea Perinthos (Marmara Ereglisi, Turkey) mint, c. 180 - 196 A.D.; obverse HPAKΛH KTCTH, head of Herakles right; reverse NERINΘIΩN, club; $70.00 (€61.60)


Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Viminacium, Moesia Superior

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Viminacium was a Roman Colony founded by Gordian III in 239 A.D. The usual legend is P.M.S. COL. VIM., abbreviating Provinciae Moesiae Superioris Colonia Viminacium. The usual type is a female personification of Moesia standing between a lion and a bull. The bull and the lion were symbols of the Legions VII and IV, which were quartered in the province.
RP92632. Orichalcum provincial sestertius, H-J Viminacium 29 (R2); Martin 2.14, AMNG I/I 103, Varbanov I 135; BMC Thrace p. 17, 21, VF, excellent portrait, crackling from light corrosion, porosity, part of reverse legend weak, weight 18.681 g, maximum diameter 39.5 mm, die axis 225o, Viminacium (Stari Kostolac, Serbia) mint, 245 - 246 A.D.; obverse IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG, laureate and draped bust right; reverse P M S COL VIM, Moesia standing facing, head left, extending hands over bull on left standing right and lion on right standing left, AN VI (year 6 of the Viminacium colonial era) in exergue; $80.00 (€70.40)


Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D., Hadrianopolis, Thrace

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Hadrian refounded a Thracian tribal capital, changed its name to Hadrianopolis, developed it, adorned it with monuments, and made it the capital of the Roman province. The city is Edirne, Turkey today. From ancient times, the area around Edirne has been the site of no fewer than 16 major battles or sieges. Military historian John Keegan identifies it as "the most contested spot on the globe" and attributes this to its geographical location. Licinius was defeated there by Constantine I in 323, and Valens was killed by the Goths during the Battle of Adrianople in 378.
RP92734. Bronze AE 25, Varbanov II 3783 (R5), Jurukova Hadrianopolis 581, Lindgren 787, Mionnet Suppl. II 801, CN Online -, BMC Thrace -, SNG Cop -, VF, centered on a tight flan, attractive style, bumps and scratches, central depressions with light spiral marks, weight 9.263 g, maximum diameter 24.8 mm, die axis 45o, Hadrianopolis (Edirne, Turkey) mint, 29 Jul 238 - 25 Feb 244 A.D.; obverse AYT K M ANT ΓOP∆IANOC AV, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse A∆PIANOΠO,ΛEITΩN (last six letters in exergue), Emperor on horseback galloping right, spear overhead in right hand, reigns in left hand; scarce; $150.00 (€132.00)


Kallatis, Moesia Inferior, c. 138 - 180 A.D.

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Kallatis was founded on the Black Sea by Heraclea Pontica in the 6th century B.C. In Greek Kallatis means "the beautiful." Its first silver coinage was minted approximately 350 B.C. In 72 B.C., Kallatis was conquered by the Roman general Lucullus and was included in the Roman province of Moesia Inferior. Throughout the 2nd century A.D., the city built defensive fortifications. Kallatis suffered multiple invasions in the 3rd century A.D. but recovered in the 4th century A.D. to regain its status as an important trade hub and port city. Today Kallatis is called Mangalia, the oldest city in Romania.
RP92865. Bronze AE 20, CN Online Kallatis CN_15950 (same dies); SNG Cop 182 (same dies); RPC online 4308 (8 spec.); AMNG I p. 110, 289 & pl. II, 11; BMC Thrace p. 22, 8, Choice aVF, full border centering, brown toned brassy surfaces, bumps and marks, edge crack, central depressions, weight 6.892 g, maximum diameter 20.1 mm, die axis 180o, Kallatis (Mangalia, Romania) mint, c. 100 - 299 A.D.; obverse laureate, bearded head of Herakles right; reverse KAΛΛATIANΩN, Tyche seated left, wearing mural crown, Nike standing left in her extended right hand, left arm resting on back of throne; Savoca Numismatik auction 32 (14 Apr 2019), lot 174; $95.00 (€83.60)


Sabina, Augusta 128 - c. 136 A.D., Perinthos, Thrace

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Perinthos, later called Heraclea and Marmara Eregli today, is 90 km west of Istanbul near a small pointed headland on the north shore of the Marmara Sea. It is said to have been a Samian colony, founded about 599 B.C. It is famous chiefly for its stubborn and successful resistance to Philip II of Macedon in 340 B.C.; at that time it seems to have been more important than Byzantium itself.
RP92875. Bronze AE 20, CN Online Perinthos CN_4717, Schonert Perinthos 380, Varbanov III 100 (R6), BMC Thrace -, SNG Cop -, VF, green patina, well centered on a tight flan, small edge splits, porosity, weight 5.147 g, maximum diameter 19.9 mm, die axis 0o, Heraclea Perinthos (Marmara Ereglisi, Turkey) mint, 128 - c. 136 A.D.; obverse CABINA - CEBACTH, draped bust right; reverse Π-EPIN-ΘIWN, Demeter standing left, two stalks of grain in right hand, long torch vertical behind in left hand; $100.00 (€88.00)











Catalog current as of Thursday, October 17, 2019.
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Roman Coins of Roman Provincial