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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |Roman Provincial||View Options:  |  |  | 

Roman Provincial Coins

The Roman Empire allowed many areas and cities to mint coins for local use, those coins are refered to as Roman Provincial or Greek Imperial coins. All the coins listed below are also listed under the emperor in power at the time of mintage. If you are looking for coins of a specific emperor, use the menu on the left. If you are looking for coins from a specific region, these coins are organized geographically under Greek Imperial in our Greek Coins catalog. The link to the Greek Coins catalog is in the header above. In this folder all provincial coins are listed from most expensive to least expensive. Start on page one to see the best or on the last page to find the bargains.

Apameia, Phrygia, c. 88 - 40 B.C.

|Apameia|, |Apameia,| |Phrygia,| |c.| |88| |-| |40| |B.C.||AE| |20|NEW
Artemis was a goddess of virginity, women's concerns, the hunt and the underworld. The enigmatic cult statue covered in apparent fertility symbols was a unique combination of the Greek virgin-huntress Artemis with an indigenous Anatolian goddess.
GB93762. Bronze AE 20, SNG Cop 177; SNGvA 8338; SNG Ashmolean 960; BMC Phrygia p. 76, 40; Weber 7026; HGC 7 672, aVF, brassy high points with toned recesses, tight flan, light marks, weight 6.409 g, maximum diameter 20.3 mm, die axis 0o, Apameia (Dinar, Turkey) mint, c. 88 - 40 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse cultus-statue of Artemis Anaitis standing facing, wearing kalathos and veil, arm supports, AΠAME downward on right, AN∆PON / AΛKIO (Androni(kos), son of Alkion, [eglogistes]) in two downward lines on left; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $80.00 (€65.60)


Apameia, Phrygia, c. 88 - 40 B.C.

|Apameia|, |Apameia,| |Phrygia,| |c.| |88| |-| |40| |B.C.||AE| |21|NEW
Rome received Apameia with the Pergamene Kingdom in 133 B.C., but sold it to Mithridates V of Pontus, who held it till 120 BC. After the Mithridatic Wars it became a great center for trade, largely carried on by resident Italians and Jews. By order of Flaccus, nearly 45 kilograms of gold, intended by Jews for the Temple in Jerusalem was confiscated in Apamea in 62 B.C.
GB93763. Bronze AE 21, HGC 7 670; cf. BMC Phrygia p. 77, 37 ff. (various magistrates), F, rough toned brassy surfaces, bumps, corrosion, weight 7.851 g, maximum diameter 21.3 mm, die axis 0o, Phrygia, Apameia (Dinar, Turkey) mint, Antiphon & Menekleos, magistrates, c. 88 - 40 B.C.; obverse bust of Athena right, wearing high-crested Corinthian helmet and aegis; reverse eagle alighting right from a basis ornamented with meander pattern, star above, basis flanked on each side by a star above a pileus, AΠAMEΩN above, obscure magistrates name below; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $80.00 (€65.60)


Apameia, Phrygia, c. 88 - 40 B.C.

|Apameia|, |Apameia,| |Phrygia,| |c.| |88| |-| |40| |B.C.||AE| |25|NEW
Rome received Apameia with the Pergamene Kingdom in 133 B.C., but sold it to Mithridates V of Pontus, who held it till 120 BC. After the Mithridatic Wars it became a great center for trade, largely carried on by resident Italians and Jews. By order of Flaccus, nearly 45 kilograms of gold, intended by Jews for the Temple in Jerusalem was confiscated in Apamea in 62 B.C.
GB93764. Bronze AE 25, SNG Cop 167; SNG Munchen 116; BMC Phrygia p. 86, 97; HGC 7 670; SNGvA -, aVF, brassy high points with toned recesses, obverse slightly off center, light scratches, weight 8.633 g, maximum diameter 24.5 mm, die axis 45o, Phrygia, Apameia (Dinar, Turkey) mint, c. 88 - 40 B.C.; obverse bust of Athena right, wearing high-crested Corinthian helmet and aegis; reverse eagle alighting right from a basis ornamented with meander pattern, star above, basis flanked on each side by a star above a pileus, AΠAMEΩN above, ΦAINIΠΠOY / ∆PAKONTO ([magistrate] Phainippos, son of Drakon) in two lines below; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $100.00 (€82.00)


Athens, Attica, Greece, c. 307 - 300 B.C.

|Athens|, |Athens,| |Attica,| |Greece,| |c.| |307| |-| |300| |B.C.||AE| |15|NEW
The designs of the early Athenian bronzes were apparently copied from the fractions that they replaced. This coin has a similar design to the silver tetrobol. Later bronzes had much lower value, in relation to their size.
GB93816. Bronze AE 15, Kroll 50; Svoronos pl. 22, 85 - 88; SNG Cop 94: HGC 4 1719 (S), VF, tight flan, obverse a little off center, porosity, weight 3.838 g, maximum diameter 14.9 mm, die axis 0o, Athens mint, c. 307 - 300 B.C.; obverse helmeted head of Athena right, crested Corinthian helmet ornamented with a snake; reverse owl standing left, head turned facing, wings closed, A-ΘH divided across fields from right to left (retrograde, as usual for the type), all within olive wreath; from the Errett Bishop Collection; very scarce; $160.00 (€131.20)


Antioch, Syria, 41 - 40 B.C., Time of Marc Antony, Labienus and Pacorus

|Antioch|, |Antioch,| |Syria,| |41| |-| |40| |B.C.,| |Time| |of| |Marc| |Antony,| |Labienus| |and| |Pacorus||AE| |24|NEW
About the time this coin was minted, the Parthians led by Quintus Labienus and Pacorus I attacked Syria, which was under Marc Antony's authority. Quintus Labienus was the son of Caesar's general Titus Labienus. He served under Brutus and Cassius, and after the battle at Philippi fled to Parthia, where he had visited before as an ambassador. After several battles against Antony's governor, Saxa, they occupied the entire province and later Asia Minor and Palestine. In Judea, Pacorus deposed King John Hyrcanus II and appointed his nephew Antigonus as king in his place. Labienus was killed during a Roman counter-attack in 39 B.C. The territory was recovered for Rome. Pacorus retreated to Parthia but died one year later in an attack on a Roman camp.
GY97975. Bronze AE 24, McAlee 56 (R2); SNG Cop 81; BMC Galatia p. 154, 25; Cohen DCA 382; HGC 9 1369; RPC I 4223 corr.; SNG Hunterian -; SNG Righetti -, EF, oval flan, exceptional for these, weight 10.557 g, maximum diameter 28.3 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 41 - 40 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right, palm branch behind neck, fillet border; reverse ANTIOXEΩN / THΣ MHTPOΠOΛ in two lines downward on right, EΩΣ THΣ IEPAΣ AΣYΛOY in two li, Zeus seated left on high back throne, Nike offering wreath in his right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, pilei each surmounted by a star flanking throne, date BOΣ (Seleucid Era year 272) in exergue (off flan), all within laurel wreath closed at the top with a thunderbolt; from a New England collector; rare; $240.00 (€196.80)


Faustina Junior, Augusta 146 - Winter 175/176 A.D., Silandus, Lydia, Hammered Edge - Protocontorniate

|Other| |Lydia|, |Faustina| |Junior,| |Augusta| |146| |-| |Winter| |175/176| |A.D.,| |Silandus,| |Lydia,| |Hammered| |Edge| |-| |Protocontorniate||Protocontorniate|NEW
A protocontorniate is a normal, large bronze coin, typically a sestertius, which was altered in antiquity by an individual hammering the edge to create raised rims. A common assumption is that protocontorniates were used as game counters. Andreas Alföldi argued that protocontorniates were New Year's gifts in the fourth century before proper contorniates were struck at the Rome mint.
RP96724. Brass Protocontorniate, GRPC Lydia 50 (1 specimen = SNG Cop 552), RPC Online IV.2 T1437 (same), SNG Cop 552, aF, corrosion, hammered rims, weight 4.072 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 0o, Silandus (near Selendi, Turkey) mint, c. 152 - 176 A.D.; obverse draped bust of Faustina II right; reverse Demeter standing slightly left, veiled, head left, poppy and ears of grain in right hand, long torch in left hand; GRPC Lydia and RPC Online both identify the only other specimen known to them (SNG Cop 552); extremely rare; $120.00 (€98.40)


Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D., Caesarea, Cappadocia

|Cappadocia|, |Domitian,| |13| |September| |81| |-| |18| |September| |96| |A.D.,| |Caesarea,| |Cappadocia||AE| |17|NEW
Mount Erciyes (Argaios to the Greeks, Argaeus to the Romans) is a massive stratovolcano 25 km to the south of Kayseri (ancient Caesarea) in Turkey. The highest mountain in central Anatolia, with its summit reaching 3,916 meters (12,848 ft). It may have erupted as recently as 253 B.C., as may be depicted on Roman era coins. Strabo wrote that the summit was never free from snow and that those few who ascended it reported seeing both the Black Sea to the north and the Mediterranean Sea to the south in days with a clear sky.
RP97898. Bronze AE 17, RPC II 1686A (1 spec.), Sydenham -, Ganschow -, BMC Galatia -, gVF, green patina, earthen deposits, light corrosion, some light scratches, weight 4.096 g, maximum diameter 17.2 mm, die axis 0o, Cappadocia, Caesarea (Kayseri, Turkey) mint, 95 - 96 A.D.; obverse AYT KAI ∆OMITIANOC CEBACTOC ΓEPMA, laureate head right; reverse KAICAPEIAC (counterclockwise), Mount Argaeus topped with wreath; ET IE (year 15) in exergue; extremely rare, only the second known, from a Norwegian collection; $180.00 (€147.60)


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Struck for Use in Roman Arabia

|Roman| |Arabia|, |Trajan,| |25| |January| |98| |-| |8| |or| |9| |August| |117| |A.D.,| |Struck| |for| |Use| |in| |Roman| |Arabia||tridrachm|NEW
This type was previously attributed to Caesarea, Cappadocia, but the Tell Kalak hoard and a lack of finds in Cappadocia indicate the type circulated in Arabia. Slightly more than two-thirds silver, the composition of this type is identical to contemporary Syrian tetradrachms. The weight indicates they are tridrachms, but there is no consensus as to the denomination. Sydenham and Kindler refer to them as tridrachms, McAlee as light tetradrachms, and Butcher as tetradrachms. The type has no iconographic link with Arabia and Arabian drachms are considerably more debased, typically at a 50:50 ratio of silver to bronze. RPC III notes they may have been struck in Rome for circulation in Arabia, or at least, the dies were made in Rome.
RS97644. Silver tridrachm, RPC III 4071 (23 spec.); Henseler 267; Sydenham Caesarea 190a; SNG ANS 1161 (Caesarea); BMC Galatia p. 55, 74 (Caesarea), VF, superb "Roman" dies portrait, toned, flow lines, light bumps and scratches, reverse slightly off center, edge splits, weight 10.347 g, maximum diameter 23.7 mm, die axis 180o, Bostra(?) mint, 112 - 114 A.D.; obverse AYTOKP KAIC NEP TPAIANOC CEB ΓEPM ∆AK, laureate and draped bust right, seen from slightly behind; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞ YΠATOC (holder of Tribunitian power, consul), distyle temple, podium of four steps, cult image of Artemis of Perge within, eagle standing on pediment with head left and wings open; scarce; $400.00 (€328.00)


Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Antioch, Seleukis and Pieria, Syria

|Roman| |Syria|, |Philip| |I| |the| |Arab,| |February| |244| |-| |End| |of| |September| |249| |A.D.,| |Antioch,| |Seleukis| |and| |Pieria,| |Syria||tetradrachm|NEW
The ruins of Antioch on the Orontes lie near the modern city of Antakya, Turkey. Founded near the end of the 4th century B.C. by Seleucus I Nicator, one of Alexander the Great's generals, Antioch's geographic, military and economic location, particularly the spice trade, the Silk Road, the Persian Royal Road, benefited its occupants, and eventually it rivaled Alexandria as the chief city of the Near East and as the main center of Hellenistic Judaism at the end of the Second Temple period. Antioch is called "the cradle of Christianity," for the pivotal early role it played in the emergence of the faith. It was one of the four cities of the Syrian tetrapolis. Its residents are known as Antiochenes. Once a great metropolis of half a million people, it declined to insignificance during the Middle Ages because of warfare, repeated earthquakes and a change in trade routes following the Mongol conquests, which then no longer passed through Antioch from the far east.6th Century Antioch
RP97596. Billon tetradrachm, McAlee 948, Prieur 448, RPC VIII U28995, BMC Galatia p. 214,520, SNG Cop 267, F, toned, porous and rough, weight 9.171 g, maximum diameter 25.5 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 248 A.D.; obverse AYTOK K M IOYΛI ΦIΛIΠΠOC CEB, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞOYCIAC YΠA TO ∆ (holder of Tribunitian power, consul for the 4th time), eagle standing left, wings open, head left, wreath in beak, ANTIOXIA over S C (senatus consulto) in exergue; from the Michael Arslan Collection; $50.00 (€41.00)


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D., Nikopolis ad Istrum, Moesia Inferior

|Nikopolis|, |Septimius| |Severus,| |9| |April| |193| |-| |4| |February| |211| |A.D.,| |Nikopolis| |ad| |Istrum,| |Moesia| |Inferior||assarion|NEW
Nicopolis ad Istrum was founded by Trajan around 101-106, at the junction of the Iatrus (Yantra) and the Rositsa rivers, in memory of his victory over the Dacians. Its ruins are located at the village of Nikyup, 20 km north of Veliko Tarnovo in northern Bulgaria. The town peaked during the reigns of Trajan, Hadrian, the Antonines and the Severan dynasty. In 447, Nicopolis was destroyed by Attila's Huns. In the 6th century, it was rebuilt as a powerful fortress enclosing little more than military buildings and churches, following a very common trend for the cities of that century in the Danube area. It was finally destroyed by the Avar invasions at the end of the 6th century.
RP97502. Bronze assarion, H-H-J Nikopolis 8.14.54.9 (R3), Varbanov I 2349 (R3), AMNG I 1447 var. (rev. ends / IC), Moushmov 975 var. (leg. in 3 lines), SNG Cop -, BMC Thrace -, VF, slight double strike on the obverse, minor porosity, off center on an irregularly shaped flan, weight 2.956 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 195o, Nicopolis ad Istrum (Nikyup, Bulgaria) mint, 9 Apr 193 - 4 Feb 211 A.D.; obverse AV K Λ C CEVHPOC, laureate head right; reverse NIKO/ΠOΛIT / ΠPOC / I in four lines within laurel wreath; from the Michael Arslan Collection; scarce; $100.00 (€82.00)











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