Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! Please call us if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business! Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Internet challenged? We are happy to take your order over the phone. Please call if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business!

× Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Recent Additions

Feb 16, 2020

Feb 15, 2020

Feb 14, 2020

Feb 13, 2020

Feb 12, 2020

Feb 11, 2020

Feb 09, 2020

Feb 07, 2020

Feb 06, 2020

Jan 29, 2020

Jan 28, 2020

Jan 27, 2020
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |Roman Provincial||View Options:  |  |  | 

Roman Provincial Coins

The Roman Empire allowed many areas and cities to mint coins for local use, those coins are refered to as Roman Provincial or Greek Imperial coins. All the coins listed below are also listed under the emperor in power at the time of mintage. If you are looking for coins of a specific emperor, use the menu on the left. If you are looking for coins from a specific region, these coins are organized geographically under Greek Imperial in our Greek Coins catalog. The link to the Greek Coins catalog is in the header above. In this folder all provincial coins are listed from most expensive to least expensive. Start on page one to see the best or on the last page to find the bargains.


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Bostra, Arabia

Click for a larger photo
Bostra was the northern Nabataean capital, until Trajan annexed the kingdom. It was then capital of Provincia Arabia, where the Third Legio Cyrenaica was garrisoned. The emperor Philip was born in Bostra and designated it a metropolis. This type was almost certainly struck with silver from the Nabatean treasury. Some specimens appear to have been overstruck on Nabatean drachms.
RP92423. Silver drachm, cf. Metcalf Tell Kalak 15 - 17; Sydenham Cappadocia 184, 185, 189 (Caesarea); BMC Galatia p. 54, 62 var. (Caesarea, no drapery); SNG Cop, VF, fantastic bold "caricature" portrait, dark old cabinet tone, slightly off center, light marks, edge crack, weight 3.082 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 210o, Bostra (Bosra, Syria) mint, Jan 112 - Aug 114 A.D.; obverse AYTOKP KAIC NEP TPAIAN CEB ΓEPM ∆AK, laureate bust right, slight drapery on left shoulder; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞ Iς (or Z, or H) YΠAT ς (holder of Tribunitian power for 16 (or 17, or 18) years, consul for the 6th time), Arabia standing facing, head left, branch in right, bundle of cinnamon sticks in left, camel left in background on left; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $150.00 (€135.00)


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D., Amphipolis, Macedonia

Click for a larger photo
In 168 B.C., the Romans invaded Macedonia and overthrew King Perseus in the First Battle of Pydna. In 149 B.C., Andriskos, at that time ruler of Adramyttium only, claiming to be Perseus' son, announced his intention to retake Macedonia from Rome. Andriskos traveled to Syria to request military help from Demetrius Soter of Syria. Demetrius instead handed him over to Rome. Andriskos escaped captivity, raised a Thracian army, invaded Macedonia, and defeated the Roman praetor Publius Juventius. Andriskos then declared himself King Philip VI of Macedonia. In 148 B.C., Andriskos conquered Thessaly and made an alliance with Carthage, thus bringing the Roman wrath on him. In 148 B.C., in what the Romans called the Fourth Macedonian War, he was defeated by the Roman praetor Q. Caecilius Metellus at the Second Battle of Pydna. He fled to Thrace, whose prince gave him up to Rome. Andriskos' brief reign over Macedonia was marked by cruelty and extortion. After this, Macedonia was formally reduced to a Roman province.
RP92633. Bronze AE 24, RPC Online IV 4232 (17 spec.); AMNG III 81; SNG ANS 183; SNG Cop 104; Evelpidis 1172 ff.; McClean II 3241, pl. 118, 9; BMC Macedonia -, VF, exotic portrait, some corrosion/porosity, weight 6.764 g, maximum diameter 23.5 mm, die axis 180o, Amphipolis mint, obverse KAICAP ANTΩNINOC, laureate head right; reverse AMΦIΠOΛEITWN, Tyche seated left, wearing turreted crown, patera in right hand, left elbow resting on back of chair; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $80.00 (€72.00)


Aurelian, August or September 270 - October or November 275 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

Click for a larger photo
In 275, Aurelian prepared a campaign against the Sassanids in Asia Minor. In Thrace, while waiting to cross the Bosphorus with his army, he ordered severe punishments for corrupt soldiers and made a list of high-ranking officers marked for execution. In September, Aurelian fell victim to a conspiracy of the Praetorian Guard and was murdered near Byzantium (Istanbul, Turkey).
RX92520. Billon tetradrachm, Dattari 5477; Geissen 3096; BMC Alexandria p. 306, 2362; Milne 4456; Curtis 1773; SNG Cop 883; Kampmann 106.54; Emmett 3923, VF, a little off center, porous, edge cracks, weight 7.814 g, maximum diameter 21.7 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 274 - 28 Aug 275 A.D.; obverse A K Λ ∆OM AVPHΛ IANOC CEB, laureate and cuirassed bust right; reverse ETOVC S (year 6), eagle standing left head turned back, wreath in beak; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $50.00 (€45.00)


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Caesarea, Cappadocia

Click for a larger photo
Kayseri, Turkey was originally named Mazaca. It was renamed Eusebia by Ariarathes V Eusebes, King of Cappadocia, 163 - 130 B.C. The last king of Cappadocia, King Archelaus, renamed it "Caesarea in Cappadocia" to honor Caesar Augustus upon his death in 14 A.D. Muslim Arabs slightly modified the name into Kaisariyah, which became Kayseri when the Seljuk Turks took control, c. 1080 A.D.
RP92844. Silver drachm, RPC III 3052 (3 spec.), BMC Galatia 86, Metcalf 77b, Metcalf Hoard 492-7 & pl. 27, Sydenham Caesarea 221, SNG Cop -, SGICV -, SNGvA -, F, well centered, light marks, porous, weight 2.864 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 0o, Cappadocia, Caesarea (Kayseri, Turkey) mint, 114 - 116 A.D.; obverse AYTOKP KAIC NEP TPAIANΩ APICTΩ CEB ΓEPM ∆AK, laureate and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞ YΠATOς (holder of Tribunitian power, consul), clasped hands holding legionary standard on prow; $120.00 (€108.00)


Arse-Saguntum, Hispania Citerior, c. 170 - 130 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Saguntum was built by Edetani Iberians in 5th century B.C. In 218 B.C., after enduring eight months of siege, the Saguntines' last defenses were finally overrun. Hannibal offered to spare the population if they were "willing to depart from Saguntum, unarmed, each with two garments." When they declined the offer and began to sabotage the town's wealth and possessions, every adult was put to death. Seven years later, the town was taken by Rome and made a Roman municipium. Saguntum grew to a city of about 50,000 inhabitants, with a great circus, a theater seating 8,000 and an amphitheater.
CE92736. Bronze sextans, Villaronga-Benages 1979, Alvarez-Burgos 2064, Villaronga CNH 35; SNG BM Spain 1113 ff., VF, green patina, area of corrosion reverse center, earthen deposits, weight 1.018 g, maximum diameter 12.4 mm, die axis 0o, Saguntum (Sagunto, Valencia, Spain) mint, c. 170 - 130 B.C.; obverse scallop shell; reverse dolphin right, crescent with horns upward above, Iberian A and star below; ex Lusitania Ancient Coins; $90.00 (€81.00)


Marcus Aurelius, 7 March 161 - 17 March 180 A.D., Edessa(?), Mesopotamia

Click for a larger photo
This coin is from of a series of rare drachms with portraits of Marcus Aurelius, Faustina II, Lucius Verus, and Lucilla, along with a small bronze of Commodus, struck in Mesopotamia, c. 165 A.D. The series commemorated the Roman victory, as this coin does with the reverse legend VΠEP NIKHC RΩMAIΩN. All have Roma reverse types, but for many, like this coin, the goddess intended and her attributes are uncertain. They were most likely struck at Edessa, but Carrhae or another mint is possible. All the types are very rare. This is the only example of this variety known to FORVM and the only coin known to Forum from this series with obverse legend ending in APM (Armeniacus - victor over the Armenians).
RS94121. Silver drachm, unpublished variety, cf. BMC Arabia p. 137, 3 and pl. XIX, 7 (AVT K M AV...NTΩNIN...), RPC online IV.3 T10747 (...ANTΩNINOC CEB), aF, toned, slightly off center, legend not fully struck, scratches, edge split, weight 2.561 g, maximum diameter 16.8 mm, die axis 0o, Mesopotamia, Edessa(?) mint, c. 165 A.D.; obverse AVTO K M AVPHΛ ANTΩNINOC APM, bare-headed, bearded bust right, drapery on shoulder; reverse VΠEP NIKHC RΩMAIΩN (for the victory of the Romans), goddess standing facing, head left, wearing tunic and mantle, globe or apple in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; extremely rare and possibly unique - the only specimen with this obverse legend known to FORVM; $240.00 (€216.00)


Caligula, 16 March 37 - 24 January 41 A.D., Sidon, Phoenicia

Click for a larger photo
Zeus was enamored of Europa and decided to seduce or ravish her. He transformed himself into a tame white bull and mixed in with her father's herds. While Europa and her female attendants were gathering flowers, she saw the bull, caressed his flanks, and eventually got onto his back. Zeus took that opportunity and ran to the sea and swam, with her on his back, to the island of Crete. He then revealed his true identity, and Europa became the first queen of Crete. Zeus gave her a necklace made by Hephaestus and three additional gifts: Talos, Laelaps and a javelin that never missed. Zeus later re-created the shape of the white bull in the stars, which is now known as the constellation Taurus.
RP91511. Bronze AE 23, Rouvier 1457 (no star visible); RPC I 4612 (9 spec.); BMC Phoenicia p. 178, 208, gF, grainy and porous, scratches, weight 10.556 g, maximum diameter 22.5 mm, die axis 0o, Sidon (Saida, Lebanon) mint, 37 - 38 A.D.; obverse laureate head right, star lower right (star not visible, RPC notes the star is often faint but likely all originally had a star); reverse veiled Europa seated on bull left, holding bull's horn with right hand, inflated veil billowing overhead in left hand, ΣI∆ΩNOΣ over L HMP (year 148) below; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; $140.00 (€126.00)


Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria, 5 - 4 B.C., Legate P. Quinctilius Varus

Click for a larger photo
Publius Quinctilius Varus was a Roman general and politician under Augustus. From 7 or 6 B.C. until 4 B.C. he governed Syria where he was known for harsh rule and high taxes. Josephus mentions the swift action of Varus in 4 B.C., against a revolt in Judaea following the death of Herod the Great. Varus occupied Jerusalem and crucified 2000 rebels. Varus is most infamous for losing three Roman legions in an ambush by Germanic tribes led by Arminius in the Battle of the Teutoburg Forest, at which point he took his own life. Upon hearing the news, Augustus tore his clothes, refused to cut his hair for months and, for years afterward, was heard, upon occasion, to moan, "Quinctilius Varus, give me back my Legions!" (Quintili Vare, legiones redde!).
RY94450. Bronze trichalkon, McAlee 87; Butcher 50c; RPC I 4252; SNG Cop 92; SNG München 640; BMC Galatia p. 159, 59; Cohen DCA 402 (S), VF/F, dark green patina, highlighting earthen deposits, porous, scratches, slightly off center, weight 8.671 g, maximum diameter 18.6 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, legate P. Quinctilius Varus, 5 - 4 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse ANTIOXEΩ EΠI OVAPOV, Tyche of Antioch seated right on rocks, turreted, wearing chiton and peplos, palm frond in her right hand, half-length figure of river-god Orontes swimming right below, his head turned facing, ZK (Actian Era year 27) in the right field; scarce; $250.00 (€225.00)


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

Click for a larger photo
The Nilometer measured the height of the annual Nile flood. Sixteen cubits was considered the ideal height of the annual Nile flood. Less could mean drought or famine. Even in modern times, grand celebrations were held when the flood reached 16 cubits. In years when the flood failed to reach 16 cubits, the celebrations were canceled, and prayers and fasting were held instead. The peak flood occurred at the end of August, which explains why the Egyptian year began on 29 August.
RX94446. Bronze drachm, Geissen 1708; Savio 2764; Milne 2230; BMC Alexandria p. 136, 1152; Kampmann 35.602; SNG Cop -; Hunterian -, aF, a few pits, edge splits, weight 21.805 g, maximum diameter 39.9 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 153 - 28 Aug 154; obverse AYT K T AIΛ A∆P ANTWNINOC CEB EYC, laureate and draped bust right, from behind; reverse Nilus reclining left, reed in right, genius emerging from cornucopia in his left, wearing lotus crown, himation from waist down, domed Nilometer in background on left, L I-Z (year 17) above, crocodile right and water plants below; $125.00 (€112.50)


Malaka, Punic Iberia, 175 - 91 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Phoenicians from Tyre founded Malaka (Málaga, Spain today) about 770 B.C. The name was probably derived from the Phoenician word for "salt" because fish was salted near the harbor. After a period of Carthaginian rule, Malaka became part of the Roman Empire. The Roman city enjoyed remarkable development under a special law, the Lex Flavia Malacitana. A Roman theater was built at this time. After the fall of the Western Roman Empire, it was ruled first by the Visigoths and then the Byzantine Empire (550–621). It was regained by the Visigoths in 621 and ruled by them until the Umayyad Muslim conquest in 711.
GB92204. Bronze quarter unit, Villaronga-Benages 798 (R5), SNG Lorichs 118, Villaronga CNH 21, Alvarez-Burgos 1744, SNG BM Spain 387, VF, green patina, highlighting earthen deposits, some light scratches, slightly off center, weight 2.864 g, maximum diameter 14.5 mm, Malaka (Málaga, Spain) mint, 175 - 91 B.C.; obverse head of Hephaistos-Vulcan right, bearded and wearing conical cap, neo-Punic inscription MLK behind; reverse star of sixteen rays, eight larger rays and eight smaller intercalated rays, all around a central pellet; ex Mike Vosper; $100.00 (€90.00)











Catalog current as of Sunday, February 16, 2020.
Page created in 1.674 seconds.
Roman Coins of Roman Provincial