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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |Roman Provincial||View Options:  |  |  | 

Roman Provincial Coins

The Roman Empire allowed many areas and cities to mint coins for local use, those coins are refered to as Roman Provincial or Greek Imperial coins. All the coins listed below are also listed under the emperor in power at the time of mintage. If you are looking for coins of a specific emperor, use the menu on the left. If you are looking for coins from a specific region, these coins are organized geographically under Greek Imperial in our Greek Coins catalog. The link to the Greek Coins catalog is in the header above. In this folder all provincial coins are listed from most expensive to least expensive. Start on page one to see the best or on the last page to find the bargains.

Tarsos, Cilicia, c. 164 - 37 B.C.

|Cilicia|, |Tarsos,| |Cilicia,| |c.| |164| |-| |37| |B.C.||AE| |20|NEW
The patron god of the Tarsos was Sandan and a large monument to Sandan existed at Tarsos until at least the 3rd century A.D. Sandan was a Hittite-Babylonian sun, storm, or warrior god, also perhaps associated with agriculture. The Greeks equated Sandan with Herakles (Hercules). At Tarsus an annual festival honored Sandan-Herakles, which climaxed when, as depicted on this coin, an image of the god was burned on a funeral pyre. It is now thought likely that the Lion of Saint Mark on the pillar in the Piazza San Marco in Venice was in origin a winged lion-griffin from a monument at Tarsus.
GB97284. Bronze AE 20, SNG BnF 1335; SNG Levante 943 var. (only the top 2 monograms); BMC Lycaonia p. 180, 106 ff. var. (monograms), VF, porous, reverse a little off center, beveled obverse edge, weight 6.506 g, maximum diameter 19.9 mm, die axis 0o, Tarsos (Tarsus, Mersin, Turkey) mint, c. 164 - 37 B.C.; obverse veiled and turreted head of Tyche right; reverse Sandan cult image standing right on horned and winged animal, on a garlanded base and within a pyramidal pyre surmounted by an eagle, three control monograms in column on left: ΠA / HB / AP, TAPΣEΩN downward on right; $90.00 (€73.80)


Elagabalus, 16 May 218 - 11 March 222 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria

|Antioch|, |Elagabalus,| |16| |May| |218| |-| |11| |March| |222| |A.D.,| |Antioch,| |Seleucis| |and| |Pieria,| |Syria||AE| |21|NEW
Antioch on the Orontes was an ancient Greco-Roman city on the eastern side of the Orontes River. Its ruins lie near the modern city of Antakya, Turkey, and lends the modern city its name. Antioch was founded near the end of the 4th century B.C. by Seleucus I Nicator, one of Alexander the Great's generals. The city's geographical, military, and economic location benefited its occupants, particularly such features as the spice trade, the Silk Road, and the Persian Royal Road. It eventually rivaled Alexandria as the chief city of the Near East. It was also the main center of Hellenistic Judaism at the end of the Second Temple period. Most of the urban development of Antioch was done during the Roman Empire, when the city was one of the most important in the eastern Mediterranean area of Rome's dominions. Antioch was called "the cradle of Christianity" as a result of its longevity and the pivotal role that it played in the emergence of both Hellenistic Judaism and early Christianity. The New Testament asserts that the name "Christian" first emerged in Antioch. The city was a metropolis of half a million people during Augustan times, but it declined to relative insignificance during the Middle Ages because of warfare, repeated earthquakes, and a change in trade routes, which no longer passed through Antioch from the far east following the Mongol conquests.
RY98692. Bronze AE 21, cf. McAlee 788, BMC Galatia p. 203, 426 ff., SNG Cop 245, aF, attractive dark patina with highlighting earthen deposits, weight 3.294 g, maximum diameter 20.6 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 16 May 218 - 11 Mar 222 A.D.; obverse AVT KAI MAP AVP ANTΩNEINOC C (or similar), radiate head right; reverse large S C, ∆E above, eagle left head right below, all within laurel wreath; $34.00 (€27.88)


Lastigi, Hispania Ulterior, 150 - 100 B.C.

|Roman| |Hispania|, |Lastigi,| |Hispania| |Ulterior,| |150| |-| |100| |B.C.||quadrans|
After its defeat in 201 B.C., Carthage ceded Iberia to Rome. In 197 B.C., the peninsula was divided into Hispania Citerior (Nearer Hispania) and Hispania Ulterior (Further Hispania). Hispania Ulterior consisted of what are now Andalusia, Portugal, Extremadura, Castilla y León, Galicia, Asturias, Cantabria, and the Basque Country. There was peace in the region until 155 B.C. when the Lusitanians attacked. The area was largely conquered by 138 B.C., but war continued until 19 B.C. when Agrippa defeated the Cantabrians in Hispania Citerior and Hispania finally was completely conquered. That same year, Augustus divided Hispania Ulterior into Baetica (modern Andalusia) and Lusitania (modern Portugal, Extremadura, and part of Castilla-León). Hispania Citerior, which now included Cantabria and Basque country, was renamed Hispania Tarraconensis.
GB93425. Bronze quadrans, Villaronga-Benages 2374 (R3), SNG BM Spain 1569 - 1571, Villaronga 4, SNG Cop 165, aF, dark tone, porous, weight 3.504 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 270o, Lastigi (Sancular la Mayor, Sevilla, Spain) mint, 150 - 100 B.C.; obverse helmeted male head right, laurel wreath border; reverse LAS within laurel wreath border; from the Errett Bishop Collection; rare; $70.00 (€57.40)


Claudius, 25 January 41 - 13 October 54 A.D., Aizanis, Phrygia

|Other| |Phrygia|, |Claudius,| |25| |January| |41| |-| |13| |October| |54| |A.D.,| |Aizanis,| |Phrygia||AE| |20|NEW
Aizanis (Aezani, Aizanoi) was an important political and economic center in Roman times. Surviving remains from the period include a well-preserved Temple of Zeus, an unusual combined theater-stadium complex, and a macellum inscribed with the Price Edict of Diocletian.
RP97510. Bronze AE 20, RPC I 3088; BMC Phrygia p. 34, 85; SNG Cop 83; vA Aizanoi 40; McClean 8744; Lindgren-Kovacs 872, F, rough, corrosion, tight flan, rev. off center, weight 3.662 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, die axis 0o, Aizanis (Cavdarhisar, Turkey) mint, magistrate Klaudios Hierax; obverse AIZANITAI − KΛAY∆ION KAICKAPA, laureate head right; reverse EΠI KΛAY∆I-OY - IEPAKOC, Zeus of Aezanis standing facing, head left, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand; $50.00 (€41.00)


Sardes, Lydia, 90 - 100 A.D.

|Sardes|, |Sardes,| |Lydia,| |90| |-| |100| |A.D.||AE| |18|NEW
Sardis was the capital of the ancient kingdom of Lydia, one of the important cities of the Persian Empire, the seat of a proconsul under the Roman Empire, and the metropolis of the province Lydia in later Roman and Byzantine times. Its importance was due first to its military strength, secondly to its situation on an important highway leading from the interior to the Aegean coast, and thirdly to its commanding the wide and fertile plain of the Hermus. As one of the Seven churches of Asia, it was addressed by John, the author of the Book of Revelation in the Holy Bible, in terms which seem to imply that its population was notoriously soft and fainthearted. Remains include a bath-gymnasium complex, synagogue and Byzantine shops.
RP98168. Bronze AE 18, RPC III 2410 (spec. 8 same dies); GRPC Lydia 299; SNG Tübingen 3801; SNG Munich 493; Waddington 5224; Mionnet IV 684, F, attractive highlighting earthen deposits, scratches, mild porosity, rev. a little off center, weight 3.654 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 180o, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, c. 90 - 100 A.D.; obverse IEPA CYNKΛ-HTOC (clockwise from upper right), bare headed, draped bust of the Senate right; reverse CAP∆-IANΩN (clockwise from lower left), hexastyle temple with three steps; $100.00 (€82.00)


Elagabalus, 16 May 218 - 11 March 222 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria

|Roman| |Syria|, |Elagabalus,| |16| |May| |218| |-| |11| |March| |222| |A.D.,| |Antioch,| |Seleucis| |and| |Pieria,| |Syria||tetradrachm|NEW
Antioch on the Orontes was an ancient Greco-Roman city on the eastern side of the Orontes River. Its ruins lie near the modern city of Antakya, Turkey, and lends the modern city its name. Antioch was founded near the end of the 4th century B.C. by Seleucus I Nicator, one of Alexander the Great's generals. The city's geographical, military, and economic location benefited its occupants, particularly such features as the spice trade, the Silk Road, and the Persian Royal Road. It eventually rivaled Alexandria as the chief city of the Near East. It was also the main center of Hellenistic Judaism at the end of the Second Temple period. Most of the urban development of Antioch was done during the Roman Empire, when the city was one of the most important in the eastern Mediterranean area of Rome's dominions. Antioch was called "the cradle of Christianity" as a result of its longevity and the pivotal role that it played in the emergence of both Hellenistic Judaism and early Christianity. The New Testament asserts that the name "Christian" first emerged in Antioch. The city was a metropolis of half a million people during Augustan times, but it declined to relative insignificance during the Middle Ages because of warfare, repeated earthquakes, and a change in trade routes, which no longer passed through Antioch from the far east following the Mongol conquests.
RP98684. Billon tetradrachm, Prieur 249 (also both ties behind neck); McAlee 758/1; SNG Cop VII 237; Bellinger Syrian 42; BMC Galatia p. 202, 419, gF, dark toning, rough surface areas, weight 12.977 g, maximum diameter 24.3 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 219 A.D.; obverse AVT K M A - ANTWNEINOC - CEB, laureate bust right, drapery on left shoulder front and back; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞ YΠATOC TO B (holder of Tribunitian power, consul for the second time), eagle standing facing on line, wings spread, head left, wreath in beak, ∆-E flanking head, star between legs; $80.00 (€65.60)


Daldis, Lydia, 69 - 79 A.D.

|Other| |Lydia|, |Daldis,| |Lydia,| |69| |-| |79| |A.D.||hemiassarion|NEW
The Zeus who was worshiped at Laodicea was a Hellenized form of the old native god, Mên. Mên had been the king and father of his people. When Greeks settled in the area they continued to worship the god whose power was supreme in the district, but they identified him with their own god Zeus. Thus at Sardis and elsewhere in the region the native god became Zeus Lydios.
GB96503. Bronze hemiassarion, GRPCL 4; RPC Online II 1325 (12 spec.); BMC Lydia p. 70, 2; SNG Cop 110, F, green patina, tight flan cutting off much of legends, legends weak, earthen deposits, weight 3.818 g, maximum diameter 16.5 mm, die axis 0o, Daldis (near Narlïkale, Turkey) mint, time of Vespasian, 69 - 79 A.D.; obverse ΘEON CYNKΛHTON, draped bust of the Senate right; reverse EΠI TI ΦΛA YΛA ΦΛA KAICAP ∆AΛ∆I (struck under Titus Flavius Hylas [at] Flaviocaesaria Daldis), Zeus Lydios standing left, wearing long chiton and himation, eagle in right hand, scepter in left hand; rare; $130.00 (€106.60)


Faustina Junior, Augusta 146 - Winter 175/176 A.D., Wife of Marcus Aurelius, Blaundos, Lydia

|Other| |Lydia|, |Faustina| |Junior,| |Augusta| |146| |-| |Winter| |175/176| |A.D.,| |Wife| |of| |Marcus| |Aurelius,| |Blaundos,| |Lydia||hemiassarion|NEW
The ruins of Blaundos' ancient gateway and a temple are located at modern Sülümenli, Uşak, Turkey. On the earliest coins of the city, the name was written Mlaundos.
RP97253. Bronze hemiassarion, GRPCL I 115; RPC online 1189; BMC Lydia 77; SNG Cop 93, SNG Munchen 92, SNG Leypold 923, Mionnet IV 115, Winterthur 3721, SNGvA -, VF, green patina, slightly rough, tiny edge cracks, rev. slightly off center, weight 3.748 g, maximum diameter 19.6 mm, die axis 180o, Blaundos (Sülümenli, Uşak, Turkey) mint, 152 - 176 A.D.; obverse ΦAVCTEINA CEBATH, draped bust right, hair in a bun behind neck; reverse BΛAVN∆EΩN, Demeter standing facing, veiled head left, poppy and two stalks of grain in extended right hand, long torch in left hand; ex Leu Numismatik auction 12 (30 May 2020), lot 839; $150.00 (€123.00)


Elagabalus, 16 May 218 - 11 March 222 A.D., Nysa, Lydia

|Other| |Lydia|, |Elagabalus,| |16| |May| |218| |-| |11| |March| |222| |A.D.,| |Nysa,| |Lydia||AE| |22|NEW
The ruins of ancient Nysa lie a few kilometers beyond the present village of Sultanhisar, Turkey on the south slope of Mt. Messogis. The site is on the Izmir-Denizli highway, not far from Aydin, in the lovely valley of the Büyük Menderes River, formerly the ancient Meander. The city of Nysa was unique in that it was built on both sides of a ravine made by a mountain stream. An amphitheater straddled the stream, and a bridge connected the two parts of the city.
RP98620. Bronze AE 22, GRPC Lydia 164 (2 spec.), RPC Online VI T4769 (2 spec.), SNG München 374, Mionnet Supp. VI 428, VF, well centered, porosity, corrosion, encrustations, weight 4.678 g, maximum diameter 22.3 mm, die axis 0o, Lydia, Nysa (near Sultanhisar, Turkey) mint, 16 May 218 - 11 Mar 222 A.D.; obverse AVT K M AVP ANTΩNINOC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse NYCAEΩN, Tyche standing facing, head left, wearing kalathos, cornucopia in left hand, rudder held by tiller in right hand; extremely rare; $125.00 (€102.50)


Marcus Aurelius, 7 March 161 - 17 March 180 A.D. Pisidia, Antiochia

|Pisidia|, |Marcus| |Aurelius,| |7| |March| |161| |-| |17| |March| |180| |A.D.| |Pisidia,| |Antiochia||AE| |20|
Antiochia in Pisidia, also know as Antiochia in Phrygia, and under the Roman Empire as Antiochia Caesareia or Antiochia Colonia Caesarea, was on the border of Pisidia and Phrygia, at the crossroads of the Mediterranean, Aegean and Central Anatolian regions.
RP98025. Bronze AE 20, Krzyzanowska 139, pl. 4 (dies not listed); RPC IV.3 T7338; BMC Lycia p. 177, 9; SNG BnF 1087; SNGvA 4922; SNG Righetti 1328, VF, well centered, highlighting desert patina, flow lines, light crackling corrosion, strike slightly weak, weight 3.381 g, maximum diameter 19.7 mm, die axis 180o, Antiochia (near Yalvaç, Turkey) mint, as caesar, c. 160 A.D.; obverse CAESAR AVRELIVS, bare head right; reverse ANTIOCHEAE COLONIAE, eagle standing half right, head right, wings displayed; $130.00 (€106.60)











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