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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |Constantinian Era| ▸ |Constans||View Options:  |  |  | 

Constans, 9 September 337 - 19 January 350 A.D.

Constans was the youngest son of Constantine I and Fausta. Born around 320, Constans inherited part of the Western Empire upon its division among the sons of Constantine. In 340, his brother, Constantine II, invaded his territory but was defeated and killed leaving Constans in total control of the West. In 350, however, the general Magnentius rebelled and Constans fled as his legions switched sides. He was overtaken and killed while trying to escape to Spain.

Constans, 9 September 337 - 19 January 350 A.D.

|Members| |Auction| |Listed|, |Constans,| |9| |September| |337| |-| |19| |January| |350| |A.D.|, |reduced| |centenionalis|
The ruins of Antioch on the Orontes lie near the modern city of Antakya, Turkey. Founded near the end of the 4th century B.C. by Seleucus I Nicator, one of Alexander the Great's generals, Antioch's geographic, military and economic location, particularly the spice trade, the Silk Road, the Persian Royal Road, benefited its occupants, and eventually it rivaled Alexandria as the chief city of the Near East and as the main center of Hellenistic Judaism at the end of the Second Temple period. Antioch is called "the cradle of Christianity," for the pivotal early role it played in the emergence of the faith. It was one of the four cities of the Syrian tetrapolis. Its residents are known as Antiochenes. Once a great metropolis of half a million people, it declined to insignificance during the Middle Ages because of warfare, repeated earthquakes and a change in trade routes following the Mongol conquests, which then no longer passed through Antioch from the far east.6th Century Antioch
RL92669. Billon reduced centenionalis, RIC VIII Antioch 116, VF, tight flan, dark patina with earthen fill, weight 1.946 g, maximum diameter 15.0 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 347 - 348 A.D.; obverse D N CONSTA-NS P F AVG, pearl-diademed head right; reverse VOT XV MVLT XX in wreath, SMAN[...] in exergue; $4.50 (4.14)


|Constans|, |Constans,| |9| |September| |337| |-| |19| |January| |350| |A.D.|, |reduced| |centenionalis|
VOT XX MVLT XXX abbreviates Votis Vicennalibus Multis Tricennalibus advertising that Constans had completed his vows (prayers) to thank God on the 20th anniversary of his rule, and made more vows to God that he might help him successfully rule to his 30th anniversary.
RL93276. Billon reduced centenionalis, cf. SRCV V 18641 ff., gVF, dark patina, centered on a tight flan, weight 1.910 g, maximum diameter 14.0 mm, die axis 0o, unknown mint, 337 - 350 A.D.; obverse D N CONSTANS P F AVG, pearl diademed head right; reverse VOT / XX / MVLT / XXX in four lines within wreath, mintmark in exergue (mostly off flan); from the Errett Bishop Collection; $50.00 SALE |PRICE| $45.00


|Constans|, |Constans,| |9| |September| |337| |-| |19| |January| |350| |A.D.|, |reduced| |centenionalis|
The reverse legend dedicates this coin to "the glory of the Army."
RL92708. Billon reduced centenionalis, RIC VIII Antioch 53, LRBC I 1387, SRCV V 18561, Cohen VII 53, Hunter V -, VF, attractive dark patina with highlighting red earthen deposits, centered on a tight flan, some porosity, weight 1.513 g, maximum diameter 15.4 mm, die axis 315o, 9th officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 346 - 348 A.D.; obverse CONST-ANS AVG, pearl diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse GLORIA EXERCITVS (glory of the army), two soldiers standing facing, flanking one standard in center, two dots above, heads confronted, each holds a spear in outer hand and rests inner hand on grounded shield, SMANΘ in exergue; $28.00 SALE |PRICE| $25.00


|Constans|, |Constans,| |9| |September| |337| |-| |19| |January| |350| |A.D.|, |reduced| |centenionalis|
The ruins of Antioch on the Orontes lie near the modern city of Antakya, Turkey. Founded near the end of the 4th century B.C. by Seleucus I Nicator, one of Alexander the Great's generals, Antioch's geographic, military and economic location, particularly the spice trade, the Silk Road, the Persian Royal Road, benefited its occupants, and eventually it rivaled Alexandria as the chief city of the Near East and as the main center of Hellenistic Judaism at the end of the Second Temple period. Antioch is called "the cradle of Christianity," for the pivotal early role it played in the emergence of the faith. It was one of the four cities of the Syrian tetrapolis. Its residents are known as Antiochenes. Once a great metropolis of half a million people, it declined to insignificance during the Middle Ages because of warfare, repeated earthquakes and a change in trade routes following the Mongol conquests, which then no longer passed through Antioch from the far east.6th Century Antioch
RL92701. Billon reduced centenionalis, RIC VIII Antioch 116, LRBC I 1399, Hunter V 63 var. (officina), Cohen VII 196, F, dark patina, red earthen deposits, tight flan, reverse a little off center, weight 2.143 g, maximum diameter 13.6 mm, die axis 0o, 10th officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 347 - 348 A.D.; obverse D N CONSTA-NS P F AVG, pearl-diademed head right; reverse VOT XV MVLT XX in wreath, SMANI in exergue; $19.00 SALE |PRICE| $17.10


|Constans|, |Constans,| |9| |September| |337| |-| |19| |January| |350| |A.D.|, |reduced| |centenionalis|
The ruins of Antioch on the Orontes lie near the modern city of Antakya, Turkey. Founded near the end of the 4th century B.C. by Seleucus I Nicator, one of Alexander the Great's generals, Antioch's geographic, military and economic location, particularly the spice trade, the Silk Road, the Persian Royal Road, benefited its occupants, and eventually it rivaled Alexandria as the chief city of the Near East and as the main center of Hellenistic Judaism at the end of the Second Temple period. Antioch is called "the cradle of Christianity," for the pivotal early role it played in the emergence of the faith. It was one of the four cities of the Syrian tetrapolis. Its residents are known as Antiochenes. Once a great metropolis of half a million people, it declined to insignificance during the Middle Ages because of warfare, repeated earthquakes and a change in trade routes following the Mongol conquests, which then no longer passed through Antioch from the far east.6th Century Antioch
RL92695. Billon reduced centenionalis, RIC VIII Antioch 116, LRBC I 1399, Hunter V 63 var. (officina), Cohen VII 196, VF, black patina, red earthen deposits, light marks, closed edge crack, weight 1.367 g, maximum diameter 14.9 mm, 10th officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 347 - 348 A.D.; obverse D N CONSTA-NS P F AVG, pearl-diademed head right; reverse VOT / XV / MVLT / XX in four lines within wreath, SMANI in exergue; $19.00 SALE |PRICE| $17.10


|Constans|, |Constans,| |9| |September| |337| |-| |19| |January| |350| |A.D.|, |quarter| |maiorina|
The Roman poet Ovid tells the story of the Phoenix: 'Most beings spring from other individuals; but there is a certain kind which reproduces itself. The Assyrians call it the Phoenix. It does not live on fruit or flowers, but on frankincense and odoriferous gums. When it has lived five hundred years, it builds itself a nest in the branches of an oak, or on the top of a palm tree. In this it collects cinnamon and spikenard, and myrrh, and of these materials builds a pile on which it deposits itself, and dying, breathes out its last breath amidst odors. From the body of the parent bird, a young Phoenix issues forth, destined to live as long a life as its predecessor. When this has grown up and gained sufficient strength, it lifts its nest from the tree (its own cradle and its parent's sepulcher), and carries it to the city of Heliopolis in Egypt, and deposits it in the temple of the Sun.'
RL91651. Billon quarter maiorina, RIC VIII Trier 228, LRBC II 33, SRCV V 18708, Cohen VII 22, VF, a little rough, edge a little ragged, weight 2.244 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 348 - 350 A.D.; obverse D N CONSTANS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse FEL TEMP REPARATIO (happy times restored), Phoenix radiate standing right on a rocky mound, TRP in exergue; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; scarce; $60.00 SALE |PRICE| $54.00










OBVERSE| LEGENDS|

CONSTANSAVG
CONSTANSAVGVSTVS
CONSTANSCAESAR
CONSTANSPFAVG
DNCONSTANSPFAVG
FLCONSTANSNOBCAES
FLCONSTANTISBEAC
FLIVLCONSTANSAVG
FLIVLCONSTANSNOBC
FLIVLCONSTANSNOBCAES
FLIVLCONSTANSPERPAVG
FLIVLCONSTANSPFAVG
FLIVLCONSTANSPIVSFELIXAVG


REFERENCES|

Bastien, P. Le monnayage de l'atelier de Lyon. De la rouverture de l'atelier en 318 la mort de Constantin (318-337). Numismatique Romaine XIII. (Wetteren, 1982).
Bruun, P. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol VII, Constantine and Licinius A.D. 313 - 337. (London, 1966).
Carson, R., P. Hill & J. Kent. Late Roman Bronze Coinage. (London, 1960).
Carson, R., H. Sutherland & J. Kent. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol VIII, The Family of Constantine I, A.D. 337 - 364. (London, 1981).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappes sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 7: Carausius to Constantine & sons. (Paris, 1888).
Depeyrot, G. Les monnaies d'or de Constantin II Zenon (337-491). Moneta 5. (Wetteren, 1996).
Failmezger, V. Roman Bronze Coins From Paganism to Christianity, 294 - 364 A.D. (Washington D.C., 2002).
King, C. & D. Sear. Roman Silver Coins, Volume V, Carausius to Romulus Augustus. (London, 1987).
Milchev, S. The Coins of Constantine the Great. (Sophia, 2007).
Paolucci, R. & A. Zub. La monetazione di Aquileia Romana. (Padova, 2000).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. V. Diocletian (Reform) to Zeno. (Oxford, 1982).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. IV: The Tetrarchies and the Rise of the House of Constantine: The Collapse of Paganism and the Triumph of Christianity, Diocletian To Constantine I, AD 284 - 337. (London, 2011).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. V: The Christian Empire: The Later Constantinian Dynasty and the Houses of Valentinian and Theodosius and Their Successors, Constantine II to Zeno, AD 337 - 491. (London, 2014).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).
Voetter, O. Die Mnzen der romischen Kaiser, Kaiserinnen und Caesaren von Diocletianus bis Romulus: Katalog der Sammlung Paul Gerin. (Vienna, 1921).

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