Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  STORE WIDE SALE!!! 10% OFF EVERYTHING!!! WE ARE OPEN AND SHIPPING!!! We Are Working From Home, Social Distancing, Wearing Masks, And Sanitizing To Pack Orders!!! Please Call Us If You Have Questions 252-646-1958 Expert Authentication - Accurate Descriptions - Reasonable Prices - Coins From Under $10 To Museum Quality Rarities STORE WIDE SALE!!! 10% OFF EVERYTHING!!! WE ARE OPEN AND SHIPPING!!! We Are Working From Home, Social Distancing, Wearing Masks, And Sanitizing To Pack Orders!!! Please Call Us If You Have Questions 252-646-1958 Explore Our Website And Find Joy In The History, Numismatics, Art, Mythology, And Geography Of Coins!!!

× Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Recent Additions

Jul 12, 2020

Jul 11, 2020

Jul 10, 2020

Jul 09, 2020

Jul 04, 2020

Jul 03, 2020

Jul 02, 2020

Jul 01, 2020

Jun 30, 2020
Medieval & Modern Coins

Jun 29, 2020

Jun 28, 2020

Jun 27, 2020

Jun 25, 2020

Jun 24, 2020

Jun 23, 2020

Jun 22, 2020
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |The Tetrarchy| ▸ |Maximian||View Options:  |  |  |   

Maximian, 286 - 305, 306 - 308, and 310 A.D.

In 286 A.D., Maximian was sent by the Emperor Diocletian against Gaulish rebels, and upon their defeat was raised to the rank of Augustus on 1 April 286. When Diocletian instituted the Tetrarchy, Maximianus was made emperor of the Western empire and seven years later Constantius I joined him as Caesar. Maximianus was forced to abdicate with Diocletian in 305 A.D., but the year after he resumed the throne with his son Maxentius. Forced to abdicate once again at the Conference of Carnute, he resumed the title of Augustus once more in 310 A.D. but was defeated and forced to commit suicide by Constantine the Great.

|Maximian|, |Maximian,| |286| |-| |305,| |306| |-| |308,| |and| |310| |A.D.|, |antoninianus|
While serving as co-Augusti, Maximian and Diocletian associated themselves with Hercules and Jupiter respectively. Diocletian was a religious conservative who wished to associate the imperial government with the traditional Roman cult, and these associations helped to do this. This was a departure from the policies of previous emperors, like Aurelian, who had strengthened the positions of non-traditional gods in the Roman pantheon.
RA92749. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 622 corr. (star over B not listed), SRCV IV 13134, Cohen VI 311, Hunter IV 55 var. (1st officina), VF, full border centering, nice green patina, flan edge a little ragged with some small cracks, weight 3.504 g, maximum diameter 24.2 mm, die axis 0o, 2nd officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 285 - 294 A.D.; obverse IMP C M AVR VAL MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right; reverse IOV ET HERCV CONSER AVGG (Jupiter and Hercules protectors the emperors), Jupiter (on left) standing right, long scepter vertical in left hand, globe in right hand; Hercules (on right) standing left, offering Victory to Jupiter with right hand, club and lion-skin in left hand, Victory raising wreath and holding palm frond, star over B low center, XXI in exergue; $80.00 SALE |PRICE| $72.00


|Maximian|, |Maximian,| |286| |-| |305,| |306| |-| |308,| |and| |310| |A.D.|, |antoninianus|
Virtus was a specific virtue in ancient Rome. It carried connotations of valor, manliness, excellence, courage, character, and worth, perceived as masculine strengths (from Latin vir, "man"). Virtus applied exclusively to a man's behavior in the public sphere, that is to the application of duty to the res publica in the cursus honorum. Private business was no place to earn virtus, even when it involved courage or feats of arms or other good qualities. There could be no virtue in exploiting one's manliness in the pursuit of personal wealth, for example. It was thus a frequently stated virtue of Roman emperors and was personified as the deity Virtus.
RA93261. Billon antoninianus, Bastien XI 424 (8 spec.), RIC V-2 447 (S), Cohen VI 555, SRCV IV 13191, Hunter IV - p. clxxxvi, Choice gVF, well centered and struck, traces of silvering, weight 4.220 g, maximum diameter 21.8 mm, die axis 0o, 3rd officina, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 7th emission, spring 290 - 291 A.D.; obverse IMP MAXIMIANVS AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right, seen from the front; reverse VIRTVS AVGG (valor of the two emperors), soldier standing left, olive branch in right hand, spear in left hand, grounded shield to left, C in exergue; scarce; $160.00 SALE |PRICE| $144.00


|Maximian|, |Maximian,| |286| |-| |305,| |306| |-| |308,| |and| |310| |A.D.|, |follis|
In Roman religion, every man has a genius, a presiding spirit. In De Die Natali, Censorinus says, from the moment we are born, we live under the guard and tutelage of Genius. Cities, organizations, and peoples also had a genius. On coins, we find inscriptions to the Genius of the Army, of the Senate, of the Emperor, etc. The legend GENIO POPVLI ROMANI dedicates this coin to the Genius of the Roman People. Genius' image is of a man with a cloak half covering the shoulders leaving the rest of his body naked, holding a cornucopia in one hand, and a simpulum or a patera in the other.
RB93176. Billon follis, RIC VI Treveri 181b, cf. Hunter V 9 var. (...P F AVG), Cohen VI 159 var. (same), SRCV IV 13238 var. (same, draped), Choice VF, nice portrait, well centered, attractive brown toned surfaces, minor edge flaw, weight 10.334 g, maximum diameter 27.0 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, c. 296 - 297 A.D.; obverse IMP MAXIMIANVS P AVG, laureate head right; reverse GENIO POPVLI ROMANI (to the guardian spirit of the Roman People), Genius standing half left, head left, kalathos on head, naked but for chlamys over left shoulder, patera in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, B left, Γ right, TR in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $90.00 SALE |PRICE| $81.00


|Maximian|, |Maximian,| |286| |-| |305,| |306| |-| |308,| |and| |310| |A.D.|, |antoninianus|
Pax, regarded by the ancients as a goddess, was worshiped not only at Rome but also at Athens. Her altar could not be stained with blood. Claudius began the construction of a magnificent temple to her honor, which Vespasian finished, in the Via Sacra. The attributes of Peace are the hasta pura, the olive branch, the cornucopia, and often the caduceus. Sometimes she is represented setting fire to a pile of arms.
RA93173. Billon antoninianus, Bastien 380, Hunter IV 31, RIC V-2 399, Cohen VI 438, SRCV IV 13155, Choice VF, well centered, silvering, flow lines, porosity, tiny edge crack, weight 4.228 g, maximum diameter 23.5 mm, die axis 0o, 2nd officina, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 290 - 294 A.D.; obverse IMP MAXIMIANVS AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right, slight drapery on left shoulder; reverse PAX AVGG (the peace of the two emperors), Pax standing slightly left, head left, Victory on globe in right hand, long scepter transverse in left hand, B in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $85.00 SALE |PRICE| $76.50


|Maximian|, |Maximian,| |286| |-| |305,| |306| |-| |308,| |and| |310| |A.D.|, |follis|
In Roman religion, every man has a genius, a presiding spirit. In De Die Natali, Censorinus says, from the moment we are born, we live under the guard and tutelage of Genius. Cities, organizations, and peoples also had a genius. On coins, we find inscriptions to the Genius of the Army, of the Senate, of the Emperor, etc. The legend GENIO POPVLI ROMANI dedicates this coin to the Genius of the Roman People. Genius' image is of a man with a cloak half covering the shoulders leaving the rest of his body naked, holding a cornucopia in one hand, and a simpulum or a patera in the other.
RB93174. Billon follis, Hunter V 26 (also 1st officina), RIC VI Ticinum 31b, Cohen VI 179, SRCV IV 13250, Choice VF, full border centering, attractive style, traces of silvering, flow lines, small areas of porosity, edge cracks, weight 10.819 g, maximum diameter 28.2 mm, die axis 150o, 1st officina, Ticinum (Pavia, Italy) mint, c. 296 - 297 A.D.; obverse IMP C MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, laureate head right; reverse GENIO POPVLI ROMANI (to the guardian spirit of the Roman People), Genius standing half left, head left, kalathos on head, nude but for chlamys over shoulder, pouring libations from patera in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, star left, PT in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $90.00 SALE |PRICE| $81.00


Maximian, 286 - 305, 306 - 308, and 310 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

|Roman| |Egypt|, |Maximian,| |286| |-| |305,| |306| |-| |308,| |and| |310| |A.D.,| |Roman| |Provincial| |Egypt|, |tetradrachm|
Elpis was the Greek personification of Hope. According the Hesiod's famous story, Elpis was the last to escape the Pandora's box. It can be debated whether she was really about "hope" as we understand it, or rather mere "expectation." In art, Elpis is normally depicted carrying flowers or a cornucopia, but on coins she is almost invariably depicted holding a flower in her extended right hand, and raising a fold of her dress with her left hand. Elpis' Roman equivalent was Spes. She was also named "ultima dea" - the last resort of men.

RX91839. Billon tetradrachm, Geissen 3286; Dattari 5875; Milne 4828; Curtis 2071; BMC Alexandria p. 329, 2556; SNG Cop 1024; Hunter 1139; Kampmann 120.17; Emmett 4114.;, gVF, well centered, strong flow lines, brown tone, die wear, weight 8.090 g, maximum diameter 20.1 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 286 - 28 Aug 287; obverse A K M A OYA MAXIMIANOC CEB, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse Elpis standing left, flower raised in right hand, raising drapery with left hand, star upper right, L - B (year 2) flanking across field; $65.00 SALE |PRICE| $58.50


Maximian, 286 - 305, 306 - 308, and 310 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

|Roman| |Egypt|, |Maximian,| |286| |-| |305,| |306| |-| |308,| |and| |310| |A.D.,| |Roman| |Provincial| |Egypt|, |tetradrachm|
Elpis was the Greek personification of Hope. According the Hesiod's famous story, Elpis was the last to escape the Pandora's box. It can be debated whether she was really about "hope" as we understand it, or rather mere "expectation." In art, Elpis is normally depicted carrying flowers or a cornucopia, but on coins she is almost invariably depicted holding a flower in her extended right hand, and raising a fold of her dress with her left hand. Elpis' Roman equivalent was Spes. She was also named "ultima dea" - the last resort of men.
RB91840. Billon tetradrachm, Geissen 3285; Milne 4814; Curtis 2067; BMC Alexandria p. 329, 2555; SNG Cop 1023; Savio 10709; Kampmann 120.16; Emmett 4114; Dattari 5873 (star), gVF, green patina, centered on a tight flan, ragged edge, weight 6.814 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 286 - 28 Aug 287; obverse A K M A OYA MAΞIMIANOC CEB, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse Elpis standing left, flower in right hand, raising drapery with left hand, L - B (year 2) flanking across fields, no star; $65.00 SALE |PRICE| $58.50


|Maximian|, |Maximian,| |286| |-| |305,| |306| |-| |308,| |and| |310| |A.D.|, |follis|
On 31 March 307, after divorcing his wife Minervina, Constantine the Great married Maximian's daughter, Fausta Flavia Maxima.
RB91858. Billon follis, RIC VI Lugdunum 228 (S), SRCV IV 13452, Cohen IV 147, Hunter V 21 var. (also laureate), Choice F, full legends, dark patina, weight 5.070 g, maximum diameter 23.9 mm, die axis 180o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, c. late summer 307 A.D.; obverse D N MAXIMAINO P F S AVG, laureate and cuirassed bust right; reverse GENIO POP ROM (to the guardian spirit of the Roman people), Genius standing slightly left, head left, kalathos on head, chlamys around waist and over left arm, pouring libations from patera in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, altar to left, N right, PLC in exergue; scarce; $40.00 SALE |PRICE| $36.00


|Maximian|, |Maximian,| |286| |-| |305,| |306| |-| |308,| |and| |310| |A.D.|, |antoninianus|
Pax, regarded by the ancients as a goddess, was worshiped not only at Rome but also at Athens. Her altar could not be stained with blood. Claudius began the construction of a magnificent temple to her honor, which Vespasian finished, in the Via Sacra. The attributes of Peace are the hasta pura, the olive branch, the cornucopia, and often the caduceus. Sometimes she is represented setting fire to a pile of arms.
RA92322. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 399, bust type H (S); Bastien VII 387, pl. XXVIII (46 spec.); Cohen VI 442; Compas Collection 235, Choice aEF, much silvering, well centered, light marks, edge cracks, weight 3.606 g, maximum diameter 22.0 mm, die axis 0o, 2nd officina, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 7th emission, spring 290 - 291 A.D.; obverse IMP MAXIMIANVS AVG, radiate consular bust left, wearing imperial mantle, eagle-tipped scepter in right hand; reverse PAX AVGG (the peace of the two emperors), Pax standing left, Victory on globe in right hand, transverse scepter in left hand, B in exergue; scarce; $110.00 SALE |PRICE| $99.00


|Maximian|, |Maximian,| |286| |-| |305,| |306| |-| |308,| |and| |310| |A.D.|, |antoninianus|
The reverse legend dedicates this coin to "Jupiter the Protector of the Emperors." The Roman's believed as the king of the gods, Jupiter favored those in positions of authority similar to his own. As the patron deity of ancient Rome, he was the chief god of the Capitoline Triad, with his sister and wife Juno. The father of Mars, he was therefore the grandfather of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome.
RA92341. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 506, SRCV IV 13143, Cohen VI 355, Hunter IV 4 ff. var. (5th officina not listed), Choice EF, superior style for the period, well struck, full borders, some silvering, weight 3.677 g, maximum diameter 23.7 mm, die axis 180o, 5th officina, Rome mint, c. 286 A.D.; obverse IMP MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse IOVI CONSERVATORI AVGG (to Jupiter the protector of the two emperors), Jupiter standing slightly left, head left, nude but for chlamys over left shoulder, thunderbolt in right hand, long scepter in vertical in left hand, XXIE in exergue; $150.00 SALE |PRICE| $135.00




  






|OBVERSE |LEGENDS

AVRVALMAXIMIANVSPFAVG
DIVOMAXIMIANOAVG
DIVOMAXIMIANOIVNAVG
DIVOMAXIMIANOOPTIMP
DIVOMAXIMIANOOPTIMOIMP
DIVOMAXIMIANOPATRIMAXENTIVSAVG
DIVOMAXIMIANOSEN
DIVOMAXIMIANOSENAVG
DIVOMAXIMIANOSENFORTIMP
DIVOMAXIMIANOSENIMP
DIVOMAXIMIANOSOCEROMAXENTIVSAVG
DNMAXIMIANOBSAVG
DNMAXIMIANOBAEATIS
DNMAXIMIANOBAEATISS
DNMAXIMIANOBAEATISSSENAVG
DNMAXIMIANOBAEATISSI
DNMAXIMIANOBAEATISSIM
DNMAXIMIANOBAEATISSIMOSENAVG
DNMAXIMIANOBEATISSIMOSENAVG
DNMAXIMIANOFELICIS
DNMAXIMIANOFELICISS
DNMAXIMIANOFELICISSSENAVG
DNMAXIMIANOFELICISSI
DNMAXIMIANOFELICISSIM
DNMAXIMIANOFELICISSIMOSENAVG
DNMAXIMIANOPFSAVG
DNMAXIMIANOSENINVAVG
IMPCCVALMAXIMIANVSPAVG
IMPCCVALMAXIMIANVSPFAVG
IMPCMAMAXIMIANVSAVG
IMPCMAMAXIMIANVSPAVG
IMPCMAMAXIMIANVSPFAVG
IMPCMAVALMAXIMIANVSAVG
IMPCMAVALMAXIMIANVSPAVG
IMPCMAVALMAXIMIANVSPFAVG
IMPCMAVMAXIMIANVSPFAVG
IMPCMAVRMAXIMIANVSAVG
IMPCMAVRMAXIMIANVSPFAVG
IMPCMAVRVALMAXIMIANVSAVG
IMPCMAVRVALMAXIMIANVSPAVG
IMPCMAVRVALMAXIMIANVSPFAVG
IMPCMVALMAXIMIANVSAVG
IMPCMVALVAXIMIANVSPFAVG
IMPCMAXIMIANVSAVG
IMPCMAXIMIANVSPAVG
IMPCMAXIMIANVSPFAVG
IMPCMAXIMIANVSPIAVG
IMPCMAXIMIANVSPPAVG
IMPCVALMAXIMIANVSAVG
IMPCVALMAXIMIANVSPAVG
IMPCVALMAXIMIANVSPFAVG
IMPMAVRMAXIMIANVSAVG
IMPMAVRVALMAXIMIANVSAVG
IMPMAXENTIVSDIVOMAXIMIANOPATRI
IMPMAXENTIVSDIVOMAXIMIANOSOCERO
IMPMAXIMIANOPFSAVG
IMPMAXIMIANVSAVG
IMPMAXIMIANVSAVGCOSVII
IMPMAXIMIANVSPAVG
IMPMAXIMIANVSPFEAVG
IMPMAXIMIANVSPFELAVG
IMPMAXIMIANVSPFAVG
IMPMAXIMIANVSPFAVGCOSVII
IMPMAXIMIANVSPIFEAVG
IMPMAXIMIANVSPIVSAVG
IMPMAXIMIANVSPIVSAVGVST
IMPMAXIMIANVSPIVSFAVG
IMPMAXIMIANVSPIVSFELIXAVG
IMPMAXIMIANVSSENAVG
MAVRMAXIMIANVSSENAVG
MAXIMIANVSAVG
MAXIMIANVSAVGVSTVS
MAXIMIANVSPAVG
MAXIMIANVSPFAVG
MAXIMIANVSSENPFAVG
VIRTVSMAXIMIANIAVG


REFERENCES|

Bastien, P. Le monnayage de I'atelier de Lyon, Diocletien et ses coregents avant la reforme monetaire (285 - 294). (Wetteren, 1972).
Bastien, P. Le Monnayage de l'Atelier de Lyon, De la Rforme Montaire de Diocltien la fermeture temporaire de l'Atelier en 316 (294 - 316). (Wetteren, 1980).
Calic, X. The Roman Avrei, Vol. Two: From Didius Julianus to Constantius I, 193 AD - 335 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappes sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 6: Macrianus to Diocletian & Maximianus. (Paris, 1886).
Depeyrot, G. Les monnaies d'or de Diocletien Constantin I (284-337). Moneta 1. (Wetteren, 1995).
Gnecchi, F. I Medaglioni Romani. (Milan, 1912).
Jelocnik, A. The Sisak Hoard of Argentei of the Early Tetrarchy. (Ljubljana, 1961).
King, C.E. & D.R. Sear. Roman Silver Coins, Vol. V, Carausius to Romulus Augustus. (London, 1987).
Mattingly, H., E. Sydenham & P. Webb. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol. V, |Part| II, Probus to Amandus. (London, 1933).
Paolucci, R. & A. Zub. La monetazione di Aquileia Romana. (Padova, 2000).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. IV. Valerian I to Allectus. (Oxford, 1978).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. V. Diocletian (Reform) to Zeno. (Oxford, 1982).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. IV: The Tetrarchies and the Rise of the House of Constantine...Diocletian To Constantine I, AD 284 - 337. (London, 211).
Sutherland, R. & C. Carson. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol. VI, From Diocletian's reform to the death of Maximinus. (London, 1967).

Catalog current as of Sunday, July 12, 2020.
Page created in 0.766 seconds.
All coins are guaranteed for eternity