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Roman Coins of the Tetrarchy

Maximian, 286 - 305, 306 - 308, and 310 A.D.

|Maximian|, |Maximian,| |286| |-| |305,| |306| |-| |308,| |and| |310| |A.D.|, antoninianus
About 287, Diocletian assumed the title Iovius and Maximian assumed the title Herculius. The titles were symbolic of their roles: Diocletian-Jove was dominant, responsible for planning and commanding; Maximian-Hercules had the heroic role of completing assigned tasks. Despite the symbolism, the emperors were not actually worshiped as the gods Jupiter and Hercules in the imperial cult. Instead, they were seen as the gods' instruments, imposing the gods' will on earth.
RB93258. Billon antoninianus, Cohen VI 583 (also Hercules striding right), RIC V-2 515 (S), SRCV IV -, Hunter V -, F, dark patina, well centered, some light corrosion, deep "cleaning" scratches, weight 4.480 g, maximum diameter 24.3 mm, die axis 0o, 6th officina, Rome mint, 293 A.D.; obverse IMP MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VIRTVS AVGG (valor of the two emperors), Hercules striding right, club downward in right hand, lion skin over left arm and shoudler, trophy in left hand, XXIS in exergue; rare with Hercules striding right (normally standing facing); $80.00 (Ä72.00)


Constantius I, May 305 - 25 July 306 A.D.

|Constantius| |I|, |Constantius| |I,| |May| |305| |-| |25| |July| |306| |A.D.|, follis
"This reverse is modeled after the famous statue of the Spirit of the Roman People in the Roman Forum. It is unclear when this statue was last seen as it is now lost. Although the coins celebrate a wide range of spirits (e.g., Rome, Augustus, the Army, etc.), the basic design comes from the same statue...The act of pouring the libation to the emperor illustrates what the Christians were required to do in order not to be persecuted." -- Roman Bronze Coins From Paganism to Christianity 294-364 A.D. by Victor Failmezger
RT93257. Billon follis, Hunter V 50 (also 2nd officina), RIC VI Cyzicus 11a, SRCV IV 14032, Cohen VII 58, Choice EF, full border centering, some silvering, flow lines, slightest porosity, weight 9.997 g, maximum diameter 27.8 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Cyzicus (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, 297 - 299 A.D.; obverse FL VAL CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES, laureate head right; reverse GENIO AVGG ET CAESARVM NN (to the guardian spirits of our emperors and caesars), Genius standing left, kalathos on head, nude but for paludamentum over shoulders and left arm, patera from which liquid flows in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, KB in exergue; $110.00 (Ä99.00)


Maximian, 286 - 305, 306 - 308, and 310 A.D.

|Maximian|, |Maximian,| |286| |-| |305,| |306| |-| |308,| |and| |310| |A.D.|, follis
In Roman religion, every man has a genius, a presiding spirit. In De Die Natali, Censorinus says, from the moment we are born, we live under the guard and tutelage of Genius. Cities, organizations, and peoples also had a genius. On coins, we find inscriptions to the Genius of the Army, of the Senate, of the Emperor, etc. The legend GENIO POPVLI ROMANI dedicates this coin to the Genius of the Roman People. Genius' image is of a man with a cloak half covering the shoulders leaving the rest of his body naked, holding a cornucopia in one hand, and a simpulum or a patera in the other.
RB93176. Billon follis, RIC VI Treveri 181b, cf. Hunter V 9 var. (...P F AVG), Cohen VI 159 var. (same), SRCV IV 13238 var. (same, draped), Choice VF, nice portrait, well centered, attractive brown toned surfaces, minor edge flaw, weight 10.334 g, maximum diameter 27.0 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, c. 296 - 297 A.D.; obverse IMP MAXIMIANVS P AVG, laureate head right; reverse GENIO POPVLI ROMANI (to the guardian spirit of the Roman People), Genius standing half left, head left, kalathos on head, naked but for chlamys over left shoulder, patera in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, B left, Γ right, TR in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $90.00 SALE |PRICE| $81.00


Maximian, 286 - 305, 306 - 308, and 310 A.D.

|Maximian|, |Maximian,| |286| |-| |305,| |306| |-| |308,| |and| |310| |A.D.|, post-reform radiate
On 1 March 293, Diocletian and Maximian appointed Constantius Chlorus and Galerius as Caesars. This is considered the beginning of the Tetrarchy, known as the Quattuor Principes Mundi ("Four Rulers of the World"). The four Tetrarchs established their capitals close to the Roman frontier: Diocletian at Nicomedia in Bithynia (Izmit, Turkey), Maximian at Mediolanum in Italy (Milan, Italy), Constantius at Augusta Treverorum in Gallia Belgica (Trier, Germany), and Galerius at Sirmium in Pannonia (Sremska Mitrovica, Serbia).
RA93177. Billon post-reform radiate, RIC VI 16b, SRCV IV 13315, Cohen VI 54, Hunter V 88 var. (5th officina), VF/F, well centered, highlighting earthen fill, edge chip, edge cracks, weight 2.958 g, maximum diameter 22.8 mm, die axis 180o, 3rd officina Cyzicus (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, c. 295 - 299 A.D.; obverse IMP C M A MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, radiate draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse CONCORDIA MILITVM (harmony with the soldiers), Maximianus standing right, short scepter in left hand and receiving Victory on globe with right from Jupiter standing left, long scepter in left hand, K Γ low center; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $30.00 SALE |PRICE| $27.00


Maximian, 286 - 305, 306 - 308, and 310 A.D.

|Maximian|, |Maximian,| |286| |-| |305,| |306| |-| |308,| |and| |310| |A.D.|, follis
Moneta was a surname given to Juno because she was said to have promised the Romans that if they fought only just wars, they would never be in want of money.
RB93178. Billon follis, RIC VI Aquileia 29b, Cohen VI 504, cf. SRCV IV 13296 (rev. field V), Hunter V 60 (same), Choice gVF, well centered, flow lines, bumps, weight 10.111 g, maximum diameter 27.0 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Aquileia mint, c. 300 A.D.; obverse IMP MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, laureate head right; reverse SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR (the sacred money of our two emperors and two princes), Moneta standing slightly left, head left, scales in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, AQP in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $90.00 SALE |PRICE| $81.00


Maximian, 286 - 305, 306 - 308, and 310 A.D.

|Maximian|, |Maximian,| |286| |-| |305,| |306| |-| |308,| |and| |310| |A.D.|, follis
In ancient Roman religion, Roma was a female deity who personified the city of Rome and more broadly, the Roman state. In Hellenistic religious tradition, gods were served by priests and goddesses by priestesses but Roma's priesthood was male, perhaps in acknowledgment of the virility of Rome's military power. The highest ranking local elites would contend for the priesthood of the Roma cult.
RB93179. Billon follis, RIC VI Aquileia 118, SRCV IV 13435, Cohen VI 64, Hunter V -, VF , well centered, highlighting earthen deposits, areas of corrosion, weight 5.543 g, maximum diameter 25.2 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Aquileia mint, 307 A.D.; obverse IMP C MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, head laureate right; reverse CONSERV VRB SVAE (Guardian of the city traditions), hexastyle temple on three steps, Roma seated facing within, head left, globe in right hand, spear in left hand, shield at her side right, wreath in pediment, AQP in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $40.00 SALE |PRICE| $36.00


Diocletian, 20 November 284 - 1 May 305 A.D.

|Diocletian|, |Diocletian,| |20| |November| |284| |-| |1| |May| |305| |A.D.|, antoninianus
In 290, Diocletian and Maximian met in Milan, on the five-year anniversary of their rule, to discuss politics and war. Rome had become only the ceremonial capital of the Empire.
RA93167. Billon antoninianus, Hunter IV 33 (also 1st officina), RIC V-2 28; Cohen VI 147, SRCV IV 12655 var. (bust left), Choice VF, well centered, nice portrait, light encrustations, reverse die wear, edge splits, weight 4.267 g, maximum diameter 23.0 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 7th Issue, spring 290 - 291 A.D.; obverse IMP DIOCLETIANVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse IOVI AVGG, Jupiter standing left, nude but for cloak over shoulders, Victory on globe in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left, eagle left at feet on left, P in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $75.00 SALE |PRICE| $67.50


Diocletian, 20 November 284 - 1 May 305 A.D.

|Diocletian|, |Diocletian,| |20| |November| |284| |-| |1| |May| |305| |A.D.|, follis
In Roman religion, every man has a genius, a presiding spirit. In De Die Natali, Censorinus says, from the moment we are born, we live under the guard and tutelage of Genius. Cities, organizations, and peoples also had a genius. On coins, we find inscriptions to the Genius of the Army, of the Senate, of the Emperor, etc. The legend GENIO POPVLI ROMANI dedicates this coin to the Genius of the Roman People. Genius' image is of a man with a cloak half covering the shoulders leaving the rest of his body naked, holding a cornucopia in one hand, and a simpulum or a patera in the other.
RB93168. Billon follis, RIC VI Heraclea 17a, SRCV IV 12787, Cohen VI 106, Hunter V 73 var. (4th officina), Choice VF, excellent centering and strike, some silvering,, weight 9.402 g, maximum diameter 28.5 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Heraclea (Marmara Ereglisi, Turkey) mint, 296 - 297 A.D.; obverse IMP C C VAL DIOCLETIANVS P F AVG, laureate head right; reverse GENIO POPVLI ROMANI (to the guardian spirit of the Roman People), Genius standing slightly left, head left, nude but for chlamys over shoulders and left arm, kalathos on head, pouring libations from patera in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, HTB in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $100.00 SALE |PRICE| $90.00


Diocletian, 20 November 284 - 1 May 305 A.D.

|Diocletian|, |Diocletian,| |20| |November| |284| |-| |1| |May| |305| |A.D.|, antoninianus
In 288, Diocletian conducted a military campaign in Raetia (Switzerland).
RA93170. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 51, Cohen VI 299, Hunter IV 32 var. (...P F AVG), SRCV IV 12676 var. (same), Choice VF, well centered, traces of silvering, flow lines, scattered porosity, weight 3.940 g, maximum diameter 22.1 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 287 - 289 A.D.; obverse IMP C DIOCLETIANVS P AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse IOVI TVTATORI AVGG (to Jupiter the guardian of the two emperors), Jupiter standing left, Victory on globe in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, eagle left at feet on left, P in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $60.00 SALE |PRICE| $54.00


Diocletian, 20 November 284 - 1 May 305 A.D.

|Diocletian|, |Diocletian,| |20| |November| |284| |-| |1| |May| |305| |A.D.|, follis
In Roman religion, every man has a genius, a presiding spirit. In De Die Natali, Censorinus says, from the moment we are born, we live under the guard and tutelage of Genius. Cities, organizations, and peoples also had a genius. On coins, we find inscriptions to the Genius of the Army, of the Senate, of the Emperor, etc. The legend GENIO POPVLI ROMANI dedicates this coin to the Genius of the Roman People. Genius' image is of a man with a cloak half covering the shoulders leaving the rest of his body naked, holding a cornucopia in one hand, and a simpulum or a patera in the other.
RB93171. Billon follis, RIC VI Treveri 576a, Cohen VI 111, SRCV IV 12763, Hunter V -, Choice aEF, well centered, nice portrait, minor encrustations, weight 8.471 g, maximum diameter 27.7 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, c. 303 - 1 May 305 A.D.; obverse IMP DIOCLETIANVS P AVG, laureate and cuirassed bust right; reverse GENIO POPVLI ROMANI (to the guardian spirit of the Roman People), Genius standing half left, nude but for chlamys over shoulders and left arm, kalathos on head, pouring libations from patera in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, S - F across field, PTR in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $110.00 SALE |PRICE| $99.00











Catalog current as of Monday, February 24, 2020.
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The Tetrarchy