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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |Crisis & Decline||View Options:  |  |  | 

Roman Coins of the 3rd Century Crisis and Decline of the Roman Empire
Salonina, Augusta 254 - c. September 268 A.D.

|Salonina|, |Salonina,| |Augusta| |254| |-| |c.| |September| |268| |A.D.||antoninianus|NEW
Pietas in traditional Latin usage expressed a complex, highly valued Roman virtue; a man or woman with pietas respected his or her responsibilities to the gods, family, other people and entities (such as the state), and understood his or her place in society with respect to others.
RS98681. Silver antoninianus, Gbl MIR 853b; Cunetio 791 (6 specimens); CHRB IX: Wortley Hoard 63; Hunter IV p. 60, 1 (Rome); RIC V-1 -; RSC IV -; SRCV III -, VF, flow lines, die wear, small spots of red encrustations, obv. double strike, tiny edge crack, weight 3.649 g, maximum diameter 21.45 mm, die axis 0o, Viminacium (Stari Kostolac, Serbia) mint, c. 260 - 262 A.D.; obverse CORN SALONINA AVG, diademed and draped bust right, hair in horizontal ridges and in plait looped below ear up the back of head, crescent behind shoulders; reverse PIETAS AVG (to the piety of the Emperor), Pietas standing facing, veiled head left, extended right hand, box of perfumes in left hand at side; rare; $100.00 (82.00)


Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D.

|Gordian| |III|, |Gordian| |III,| |29| |July| |238| |-| |25| |February| |244| |A.D.||antoninianus|
Providence is most often depicted clothed in a matron's gown, holding a cornucopia in her left hand and in her right a short wand, which she points to a globe. She holds this globe in her right hand or it lies at her feet. The type is intended to mark the power and wisdom of the emperor, who ruled the Roman world.
RS94955. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV 148, RSC IV 296, Hunter III 60, Cohen V 296, SRCV III 8654, VF, full border centering, flow lines, uneven toning, weight 3.692 g, maximum diameter 26.1 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 241 - 243 A.D.; obverse IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse PROVID AVG (the foresight of the Emperor), Providentia standing slightly left, head left, wand pointed downward in right hand over globe at feet on left, long scepter vertical in left hand; $80.00 (65.60)


Philip II, July or August 247 - Late 249 A.D., Neapolis, Samaria, Syria Palestina

|Roman| |Judea| |&| |Palestina|, |Philip| |II,| |July| |or| |August| |247| |-| |Late| |249| |A.D.,| |Neapolis,| |Samaria,| |Syria| |Palestina||AE| |28|
Neapolis, Samaria, the biblical Shechemis, is now Nablus, Israel, the site of Joseph's Tomb and Jacob's well. Jesus spoke here to a Samaritan woman. The city was refounded as Flavia Neopolis in Syria Palestina after the Jewish Revolt. These coin types were used by archaeologists in the 1950's and 60's to locate the remains of the temple complex by comparing the profile of the mountain to the surrounding terrain.
RP98110. Bronze AE 28, Harl Neapolis 68 (A16/P65); RPC Online VIII U2411; BMC Palestine p. 69, 140; SNG Cop 20; Rosenberger III 101; Sofaer 134 corr. (Philip I), aVF, well centered, highlighting earthen deposits, grainy porous surfaces, weight 11.690 g, maximum diameter 27.8 mm, die axis 180o, Neapolis (Nablus, Israel) mint, Jul/Aug 247- Late 249 A.D.; obverse IMP C M IVL PHI-LIPPO P F AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse COL SER-G NEAP-OL, Mt. Gerizim comprised of two masses separated by a ravine, arched colonnade below, stairway up the left mass to temple on peak, road up to altar on right peak, all supported by an eagle standing slightly left, head right, wings open; ex Menashe Landman Collection; scarce; $180.00 (147.60)


Salonina, Augusta 254 - c. September 268 A.D., Pergamon, Mysia

|Pergamon|, |Salonina,| |Augusta| |254| |-| |c.| |September| |268| |A.D.,| |Pergamon,| |Mysia||AE| |27|
Salonina was the wife of emperor Gallienus. A very beautiful and intelligent woman, she was extremely loyal to her husband. Opinion is divided as to whether she was murdered in the purge of Gallienus family after his murder, or if she survived.

Pergamon, Mysia was located to the northwest of the modern city of Bergama, Turkey, 16 miles (26 km) from the Aegean Sea on a promontory on the north side of the Caicus (Bakircay) River. It was the capital of the Kingdom of Pergamon under the Attalid dynasty, 281-133 B.C. Pergamon is cited in the book of Revelation as one of the seven churches of Asia.
RP97266. Bronze AE 27, Weber 5230, SNG BnF 2304 var. (...CE), SNG Tanrikulu 315 var. (same), SNG Cop -, SNGvA -; SNG Hunt -, BMC Mysia -, VF, well centered, a bit rough and porous, weight 6.447 g, maximum diameter 27.1 mm, die axis 0o, Pergamon (Bergama, Turkey) mint, 254 - c. Sep 268 A.D.; obverse KOP CAΛΩNEINA CEB, diademed and draped bust right, wearing stephane, hair in ridges and in plait looped below ear up the back of head; reverse EΠI C AVP ∆AMA ΠEPΓAMH/NΩN - ΠPΩ - Γ - NEΩK (in two clockwise lines), Hygieia standing right, feeding snake held in her right hand, from philae in her left hand; ex Gorny & Mosch online auction 259 (20 Oct 2018), lot 3468; first specimen of this type handled by FORVM; rare; $110.00 (90.20)


Valerian I, October 253 - c. June 260 A.D., Anazarbus, Cilicia

|Cilicia|, |Valerian| |I,| |October| |253| |-| |c.| |June| |260| |A.D.,| |Anazarbus,| |Cilicia||hexassarion|
Anazarbus was founded by Assyrians. Under the early Roman Empire, it was known as Caesarea and was the Metropolis (capital) of the late Roman province Cilicia Secunda. It was the home of the poet Oppian. Rebuilt by the Byzantine emperor Justin I after an earthquake in 525, it became Justinopolis. Despite the name changes, the old native name persisted. When Thoros I, king of Lesser Armenia, made it his capital early in the 12th century, it was known as Anazarva.

According to Ziegler (p. 124), the Γ Γ means,"[chairman of] 3 [provinces], [holder of] 3 [neocorates]." ET BOC is the date, year 272 of Caesarea. The era began in 19 B.C. when the city was visited by Augustus, refounded and renamed Caesarea, dating this coin to 253 - 254 A.D. In the reverse exergue, Anazarbus boasts A M K T (ΠPΩTH MEΓIΣTH KAΛΛIΣTH TIMΩTATH), meaning First (A is the Greek numeral one), Greatest, Most Beautiful, and Most Esteemed (or Honored).
RP97262. Bronze hexassarion, Ziegler 834 (Vs1/Rs4); SNG BnF 2162; SNG Levante 1520; SNGvA 5508; BMC Lycaonia p. 40, 43 Weber 7505; SNG Cop -, Choice VF, well centered on a broad flan, nice green patina, some legend and highest points a little weakly stuck, light marks, weight 17.070 g, maximum diameter 30.5 mm, die axis 180o, Anazarbus (Anavarza, Turkey) mint, Oct 235 - 254 A.D.; obverse AVT K OVAΛEPIANOC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from the front; reverse ANAZAPBOV MHTPOΠ, six agonistic prize crowns arranged in two rows of three, Γ − Γ above, ET BOC (year 272) across center, AMKT below; ex Zeus Numismatics auction 11 (1 Aug 2020), lot 459; $140.00 (114.80)


Cotiaeum, Phrygia, c. 235 - 238 A.D. Diogenes, Archon

|Other| |Phrygia|, |Cotiaeum,| |Phrygia,| |c.| |235| |-| |238| |A.D.| |Diogenes,| |Archon||diassarion|
The image of Demos, the personification of the People, was used on ancient coinage as early as the 5th century B.C. In Roman times, many towns under Roman domination struck pseudo-autonomous coinage depicting either the bust or head of Demos, or showed him standing with the Emperor, Boule (the city council), or the Demos of another city.
RP97257. Bronze diassarion, SNG Cop 318 - 319; BMC Phrygia p. 162, 20, SNGvA 3776, SNG Righetti 1165, Kurth Demos 398, Martin Demos 16, VF, well centered on a broad flan, nice dark green patina, light earthen deposits, light marks, some die wear, weight 7.915 g, maximum diameter 25.8 mm, die axis 0o, Cotiaeum (Ktahya, Turkey) mint, time of Valerian I - Gallienus, c. 235 - 238 A.D.; obverse ∆HMOC (Demos) KOTIAEΩN, diademed bust of the Demos to right, slight drapery over far shoulder; reverse EΠI ∆IOΓENOVC ∆IONVCIOV (struck under Diogenes, son of Dionysios), Zeus seated left on a low backless throne, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, A-PX (archon - Diogenes' title) divided across fields, KOTIAEΩN in exergue; rare; $120.00 (98.40)


Maximinus II Daia, Late 309 - 30 April 313 A.D.

|Maximinus| |I|, |Maximinus| |II| |Daia,| |Late| |309| |-| |30| |April| |313| |A.D.||follis|
In Roman religion, every man has a genius, a presiding spirit. In De Die Natali, Censorinus says, from the moment we are born, we live under the guard and tutelage of Genius. Cities, organizations, and peoples also had a genius. On coins, we find inscriptions to the Genius of the Army, of the Senate, of the Emperor, etc. The legend GENIO POP ROM dedicates this coin to the Genius of the Roman People.
RL94880. Billon follis, RIC VI Roma 294b, SRCV IV 14859A, Cohen VII 89, Hunter V -, VF/F, desert patina, a little off center on a broad flan, reverse weak and uneven, scratches, weight 3.655 g, maximum diameter 23.3 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 312 - 313 A.D.; obverse IMP MAXIMINVS P F AVG, laureate and cuirassed bust right; reverse GENIO POPVLI ROMANI (to the guardian spirit of the Roman People), Genius standing slightly left, head left, kalathos on head, nude but for chlamys over shoulders and left arm, patera in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, R[...] in exergue; RIC VI lists as common but this is the first specimen of this type handled by FORVM; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $60.00 (49.20)


Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D.

|Gordian| |III|, |Gordian| |III,| |29| |July| |238| |-| |25| |February| |244| |A.D.||sestertius|
Victory or Nike is seen with wings in most statues and paintings, with one of the most famous being the Winged Victory of Samothrace. Most other winged deities in the Greek pantheon had shed their wings by Classical times. Nike is the goddess of strength, speed, and victory. Nike was a very close acquaintance of Athena and is thought to have stood in Athena's outstretched hand in the statue of Athena located in the Parthenon. Victory or Nike is also one of the most commonly portrayed figures on Greek and Roman coins.
RB97216. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV 337a, Cohen V 351, SRCV III 8741, Hunter III 155, Choice F, well centered, dark green patina, light earthen deposits, light scratches, edge cracks, weight 21.274 g, maximum diameter 30.9 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 241 A.D.; obverse IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VICTORIA AETER (eternal victory), Victory standing half left, head left, shield in right hand resting on captive seated left at feet on left, palm frond in left hand, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field below center; $140.00 (114.80)


Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria

|Antioch|, |Gordian| |III,| |29| |July| |238| |-| |25| |February| |244| |A.D.,| |Antioch,| |Seleucis| |and| |Pieria,| |Syria||tetradrachm|
The ruins of Antioch on the Orontes lie near the modern city of Antakya, Turkey. Founded near the end of the 4th century B.C. by Seleucus I Nicator, one of Alexander the Great's generals, Antioch's geographic, military and economic location, particularly the spice trade, the Silk Road, the Persian Royal Road, benefited its occupants, and eventually it rivaled Alexandria as the chief city of the Near East and as the main center of Hellenistic Judaism at the end of the Second Temple period. Antioch is called "the cradle of Christianity," for the pivotal early role it played in the emergence of the faith. It was one of the four cities of the Syrian tetrapolis. Its residents are known as Antiochenes. Once a great metropolis of half a million people, it declined to insignificance during the Middle Ages because of warfare, repeated earthquakes and a change in trade routes following the Mongol conquests, which then no longer passed through Antioch from the far east.6th Century Antioch
RY94939. Billon tetradrachm, McAlee 877 (S), Prieur 291A, SNG Cop 258, RPC VII Online U68042, aF, debased metal with coppery high points and green corrosion, scratches, porosity, weight 11.411 g, maximum diameter 26.2 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 241 - 25 Feb 244 A.D.; obverse AYTOK K M ANT ΓOP∆IANOC CEB, laureate bust right, slight drapery on left shoulder in front and back; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞ YΠA TO B (holder of Tribunitian power, consul for the second time), eagle standing facing, head left, tail left, wings open, wreath in beak, beneath crescent horns up over ram leaping left with head turned right; scarce; $40.00 (32.80)


Valerian I, October 253 - c. June 260 A.D., Isinda, Pisidia

|Pisidia|, |Valerian| |I,| |October| |253| |-| |c.| |June| |260| |A.D.,| |Isinda,| |Pisidia||assarion|
Isinda stood in a strategic position at the western end of the pass leading from Pamphylia by Termessus to Pisidia. The coinage of Isinda indicates the city considered itself an Ionian colony.
RP97734. Bronze assarion, SNG BnF 1622; SNG Pfalz 234; BMC Lycia p. 227, 21; SNG Hunterian -; SNGvA -; SNG Cop -, aVF, dark brown patina, weight 8.444 g, maximum diameter 24.3 mm, die axis 180o, Isinda (Kisla, Turkey) mint, Oct 253 - c. Jun 260 A.D.; obverse AK ΠΛ OVAΛEPIANON CEB, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse ICIN-∆-EΩN, mother goddess seated right on a high backed throne, holding swaddled infant on her lap, coiled serpent rising up before her; ex Numismatica Ars Classica Auction 100 (29 May 2017), lot 1320; $130.00 (106.60)











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