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Roman coins of the Constantinian Era

Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

|Constantine| |the| |Great|, |Constantine| |the| |Great,| |Early| |307| |-| |22| |May| |337| |A.D.|, centenionalis
As emperor, Constantine enacted many administrative, financial, social, and military reforms to strengthen the empire. The government was restructured and civil and military authority separated. A new gold coin, the solidus, was introduced to combat inflation. It would become the standard for Byzantine and European currencies for more than a thousand years.
RL93255. Billon centenionalis, RIC VII Antioch 81, LRBC I 1347, SRCV IV 16270, Cohen VII 454, Choice aEF, much silvering, well centered, some porosity, weight 2.414 g, maximum diameter 19.95 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 326 - 327 A.D.; obverse CONSTAN-TINVS AVG, rosette-diademed head right; reverse PROVIDENTIAE AVGG (to the foresight of the two emperors), campgate with two turrets, star above, pellet in doorway, SMANTA in exergue; $90.00 (Ä81.00)


Constantius II, 22 May 337 - 3 November 361 A.D.

|Constantius| |II|, |Constantius| |II,| |22| |May| |337| |-| |3| |November| |361| |A.D.|, reduced centenionalis
11th Officina! The mint mark reads SM for Sacra Moneta, AN for the Antioch mint and AI the number 11 for the 11th officina (mint workshop). Antioch's fifteen striking officinae for this issue was three times larger than the more typical five operating workshops at a Roman mint.
RL92670. Bronze reduced centenionalis, Hunter V 118 (11th officina), RIC VIII Antioch 113, LRBC I 1398, SRCV V 18076, Cohen VII 335, VF, dark patina with red earthen fill, tight flan cutting off parts of legend, weight 1.946 g, maximum diameter 15.0 mm, die axis 180o, 11th officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 347 - 348 A.D.; obverse D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed head right; reverse VOT / XX / MVLT / XXX in four lines within wreath, SMANAI in exergue; $22.00 SALE |PRICE| $19.80


Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

|Constantine| |the| |Great|, |Constantine| |the| |Great,| |Early| |307| |-| |22| |May| |337| |A.D.|, reduced centenionalis
Soon after the Feast of Easter 337, Constantine fell seriously ill. He left Constantinople for the hot baths near his mother's city of Helenopolis. There, in a church his mother built in honor of Lucian the Apostle, he prayed, and there he realized that he was dying. He attempted to return to Constantinople, making it only as far as a suburb of Nicomedia. He summoned the bishops, and told them of his hope to be baptized in the River Jordan, where Christ was written to have been baptized. He requested the baptism right away, promising to live a more Christian life should he live through his illness. The bishops, Eusebius records, "performed the sacred ceremonies according to custom." It has been thought that Constantine put off baptism as long as he did so as to be absolved from as much of his sin as possible. Constantine died soon after at a suburban villa called Achyron, on 22 May 337.
RL92671. Billon reduced centenionalis, RIC VIII Antioch 112, SRCV V 17471, LRBC I 1397, Cohen VII 716, Hunter V -, VF, dark patina, highlighting red earthen deposits, ragged flan, edge crack, weight 1.428 g, maximum diameter 15.0 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, posthumous, late 347 - 348 A.D.; obverse DV CONSTANTINVS P T AVGG (Divus Constantinus Pater Trium Augusti = Divine Constantine, father of the three emperors), veiled bust right; reverse VN - MR (venerabilis memoria - revered memory), Constantine standing slightly right, togate, veiled head right, SMAN[..] in exergue; $18.00 SALE |PRICE| $16.20


Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

|Constantine| |the| |Great|, |Constantine| |the| |Great,| |Early| |307| |-| |22| |May| |337| |A.D.|, reduced centenionalis
Soon after the Feast of Easter 337, Constantine fell seriously ill. He left Constantinople for the hot baths near his mother's city of Helenopolis. There, in a church his mother built in honor of Lucian the Apostle, he prayed, and there he realized that he was dying. He attempted to return to Constantinople, making it only as far as a suburb of Nicomedia. He summoned the bishops, and told them of his hope to be baptized in the River Jordan, where Christ was written to have been baptized. He requested the baptism right away, promising to live a more Christian life should he live through his illness. The bishops, Eusebius records, "performed the sacred ceremonies according to custom." It has been thought that Constantine put off baptism as long as he did so as to be absolved from as much of his sin as possible. Constantine died soon after at a suburban villa called Achyron, on 22 May 337.
RL92672. Billon reduced centenionalis, cf. SRCV V 17467 (various mints), F, dark patina, highlighting red earthen deposits, weight 1.605 g, maximum diameter 14.6 mm, die axis 180o, posthumous, late 347 - 348 A.D.; obverse DV CONSTANTINVS P T AVGG (Divus Constantinus Pater Trium Augusti = Divine Constantine, father of the three emperors), veiled bust right; reverse VN - MR (venerabilis memoria - revered memory), Constantine standing slightly right, togate, veiled head right, SM[...] in exergue; $14.00 SALE |PRICE| $12.60


Constantius II, 22 May 337 - 3 November 361 A.D.

|Constantius| |II|, |Constantius| |II,| |22| |May| |337| |-| |3| |November| |361| |A.D.|, reduced centenionalis
In 337 A.D., Constantine II, Constantius II, and Constans succeed their father Constantine I and rule as co-emperors. A number of descendants of Constantius Chlorus, including the caesar Delmatius, as well as officials of the Roman Empire, were executed. The three Augusti denied responsibility for the purge.
RL92665. Bronze reduced centenionalis, RIC VIII Antioch 52 (S), LRBC I 1386, SRCV V 18003, Cohen VII 97, Hunter V 111 var. (14th officina), gVF, green patina with red earthen encrustation, tight flan, weight 1.567 g, maximum diameter 14.6 mm, die axis 180o, 12th officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 337 - 341 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTIVS AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse GLORIA EXERCITVS (glory of the army), two soldiers standing facing, flanking one standard in center, heads confronted, each holds a spear in outer hand and rests inner hand on grounded shield, dots in upper left and right fields, SMANBI in exergue; $25.00 SALE |PRICE| $22.50


Constantius II, 22 May 337 - 3 November 361 A.D.

|Constantius| |II|, |Constantius| |II,| |22| |May| |337| |-| |3| |November| |361| |A.D.|, reduced centenionalis
In a religious context, votum, plural vota, is a vow or promise made to a deity. The word comes from the past participle of voveo, vovere; as the result of the verbal action "vow, promise", it may refer also to the fulfillment of this vow, that is, the thing promised. The votum is thus an aspect of the contractual nature of Roman religion, a bargaining expressed by do ut des, "I give that you might give."
RL92666. Billon reduced centenionalis, RIC VIII Antioch 113, LRBC I 1398, SRCV V 18076, Cohen VII 335, Hunter V 117 var. (6th officina), VF, dark green patina, tight flan, red earthen encrustation, porosity, weight 1.765 g, maximum diameter 14.4 mm, die axis 150o, 7th officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 347 - 348 A.D.; obverse D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed head right; reverse VOT / XX / MVLT / XXX in four lines within wreath, SMANZ in exergue; $19.00 SALE |PRICE| $17.10


Constantius II, 22 May 337 - 3 November 361 A.D.

|Constantius| |II|, |Constantius| |II,| |22| |May| |337| |-| |3| |November| |361| |A.D.|, reduced centenionalis
n 348, the Goth bishop Wulfila escaped religious persecution by the Gothic chieftain Athanaric and obtained permission from Constantius II to migrate with his flock of converts to Moesia and settle near Nicopolis ad Istrum (Bulgaria).
RL92667. Billon reduced centenionalis, RIC VIII Nicomedia 48, LRBC I 1306, SRCV V 18074, Cohen VII 335, Hunter V -, VF, centered on a tight flan cutting of tops of legend letters, earthen encrusted, weight 1.137 g, maximum diameter 14.04 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Cyzicus (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, 347 - 348 A.D.; obverse D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed head right; reverse VOT / XX / MVLT / XXX in four lines within wreath, SMKA in exergue; $19.00 SALE |PRICE| $17.10


Constantius II, 22 May 337 - 3 November 361 A.D.

|Constantius| |II|, |Constantius| |II,| |22| |May| |337| |-| |3| |November| |361| |A.D.|, reduced centenionalis
In a religious context, votum, plural vota, is a vow or promise made to a deity. The word comes from the past participle of voveo, vovere; as the result of the verbal action "vow, promise", it may refer also to the fulfillment of this vow, that is, the thing promised. The votum is thus an aspect of the contractual nature of Roman religion, a bargaining expressed by do ut des, "I give that you might give."
RL92668. Billon reduced centenionalis, Hunter V 116 (also 2nd officina), RIC VIII Antioch 113, LRBC I 1398, SRCV V 18076, Cohen VII 335, VF, tight flan cutting off part of legend, earthen deposits, light marks, weight 1.821 g, maximum diameter 14.3 mm, die axis 0o, 2nd officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 347 - 348 A.D.; obverse D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed head right; reverse VOT / XX / MVLT / XXX in four lines within wreath, SMANB in exergue; $19.00 SALE |PRICE| $17.10


Magnentius, 18 January 350 - 10 August 353 A.D.

|Magnentius|, |Magnentius,| |18| |January| |350| |-| |10| |August| |353| |A.D.|, heavy maiorina
On 28 September 351, at the Battle of Mursa Major, Constantius II defeated the usurper Magnentius. The battle was one of the bloodiest in Roman military history. During the fighting Marcellinus, a general of Magnentius was killed, but Magnentius himself survived.
RL92339. Billon heavy maiorina, RIC VIII Amiens 23 (S), Bastien MM 125 (8 spec.), LRBC II 13, SRCV V 18817, Cohen VIII 69, VF, well centered, brown tone, porous, areas of light corrosion, edge split, weight 4.596 g, maximum diameter 23.4 mm, die axis 0o, Ambianum (Amiens, France) mint, spring 351 - 18 Aug 353 A.D.; obverse D N MAGNENTIVS P F AVG, bare-headed, draped, and cuirassed bust right, A behind; reverse VICTORIAE DD NN AVG ET CAE (victories of our lords, Emperor and Caesar), two Victories standing confronted, together holding wreath containing VOT V MVLT X in four lines, staurogram (rho-cross) above, AMB and crescent in exergue; scarce; $110.00 SALE |PRICE| $99.00


Germanic Tribes, Pseudo-Imperial Coinage, Mid 4th - Early 5th Century A.D.

|Germanic| |Tribes|, |Germanic| |Tribes,| |Pseudo-Imperial| |Coinage,| |Mid| |4th| |-| |Early| |5th| |Century| |A.D.|, AE 21
This type was minted by and used as currency by tribes outside the Roman Empire. It copied a type struck under Vetranio in the name of Constantius II.
RL94454. Bronze AE 21, cf. RIC VIII Siscia 284 (S), LRBC II 1171, SRCV V 18903 (official, billon maiorina, issued by Vetranio for Constantius II, 1 Mar - 25 Dec 350), F, a little rough and porous, very irregular flan shape, weight 3.625 g, maximum diameter 20.5 mm, die axis 45o, Germanic tribal mint, 350 - early 5th century A.D.; obverse pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right, Z(?) behind, blundered legend imitating D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG; reverse emperor holding two standards ornamented with blundered Christograms, blundered legend imitating CONCORDIA MILITVM; $65.00 SALE |PRICE| $58.50











Catalog current as of Friday, February 21, 2020.
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Constantinian Era