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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |The Severan Period| ▸ |Plautilla||View Options:  |  |  | 

Plautilla, Augusta 202 - 22 January 205 A.D., Wife of Caracalla

Plautilla was the daughter of the immensely wealthy and powerful Praetorian Prefect Plautianus. She was married to Caracalla in 202 A.D., to both partners' mutual disgust. Their hatred for one another was so intense that they lived in different palaces and the marriage was likely never consummated. After the fall and execution of her father in 205, Plautilla was exiled to the Lipari islands. After seven years of suffering, Caracalla had her executed in 212 A.D.

|Plautilla|, |Plautilla,| |Augusta| |202| |-| |22| |January| |205| |A.D.,| |Wife| |of| |Caracalla||denarius|
Plautilla was the wife of Caracalla and daughter of the Praetorian Prefect Plautianus. The "eternal harmony" between Caracalla and Plautilla was complete fiction. She and Caracalla hated each other, lived separately, and the marriage was likely never consummated. After the fall and execution of her father, Caracalla's praetorian prefect, she was exiled to the Lipari islands and executed in 212 A.D.
RS113141. Silver denarius, BMCRE V p. 235, 401 (also seven ridges); RIC IV 361 (S); RSC III 10; Hunter III p. 67, 1; SRCV II 7069, Choice VF, well centered, toned, flow lines, edge cracks, rev. die wear, weight 3.382 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 202 A.D.; obverse PLAVTILLAE AVGVSTAE, draped bust right, hair in seven horizontal ridges, flat chignon at back of head; reverse CONCORDIAE AETERNAE (eternal harmony), Caracalla on right, standing left, togate, roll in left hand, clasping right hands with Plautilla who stands right, fold of drapery over her left arm; $120.00 SALE PRICE $108.00


|Plautilla|, |Plautilla,| |Augusta| |202| |-| |22| |January| |205| |A.D.,| |Wife| |of| |Caracalla||denarius|
Although this coin suggests Caracalla and Plautilla desired an heir, it would have been difficult because their mutual hatred was so strong they even refused to dine together. Their marriage was likely never consummated. After the fall and execution of her father, Caracalla's praetorian prefect, she was exiled to the Lipari islands and executed in 212 A.D.
RS111664. Silver denarius, RIC IV 367 (S); RSC III 16; BMCRE V p. 237, 422; Hunter III 8; SRCV II 7072, aVF, nice portrait, full legends, broad flan, flow lines, rev. die wear, tiny edge split, weight 2.681 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, c. 203 A.D.; obverse PLAVTILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair wavy, plait looped at back of neck; reverse PIETAS AVGG (to the piety of the two emperors), Pietas standing facing, head right, long scepter vertical in right hand, child on left arm; ex Victoria Numismatics auction 4 (21 Dec 2022), lot 664; scarce; $130.00 SALE PRICE $117.00


Plautilla, Augusta 202 - 22 January 205 A.D., Anazarbus, Cilicia

|Cilicia|, |Plautilla,| |Augusta| |202| |-| |22| |January| |205| |A.D.,| |Anazarbus,| |Cilicia||assarion|
Anazarbus was founded by Assyrians. Under the early Roman Empire it was known as Caesarea, and was the metropolis (capital) of the late Roman province Cilicia Secunda. It was the home of the poet Oppian. Rebuilt by the Byzantine emperor Justin I after an earthquake in the 6th century, it became Justinopolis (525); but the old native name persisted, and when Thoros I, king of Lesser Armenia, made it his capital early in the 12th century, it was known as Anazarva.
RP111634. Bronze assarion, SNG Levante 1411, Ziegler 295, SNG BnF -, SNG Cop -, VF, well centered, broad flan, obverse encrustation, scratches, weight 4.399 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, die axis 0o, Anazarbus (Anavarza, Turkey) mint, 202 - 203 A.D.; obverse ΦOY ΠΛAYTIΛΛA, draped bust right; reverse ANAZAPBEΩN NEΩK ET, prize-crown inscribed OΛYMΠIA, AKC ([year] 221) above; rare; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00


|Plautilla|, |Plautilla,| |Augusta| |202| |-| |22| |January| |205| |A.D.,| |Wife| |of| |Caracalla||denarius|
Concordia, the goddess of agreement, understanding, and marital harmony, did not favor Plautilla and Caracalla. Plautilla and Caracalla hated each other, lived separately, and the marriage was likely never consummated. After the fall and execution of her father, Caracalla's praetorian prefect, she was exiled to the Lipari islands and executed in 212 A.D.
SH35849. Silver denarius, RIC IV 363 (S); RSC III 1; BMCRE V p. 236, 411; SRCV II 7065; Hunter III -, Choice EF, cameo toning, weight 3.058 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 202 - 22 Jan 205 A.D.; obverse PLAVTILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair in ridges, large bun at back; reverse CONCORDIA AVGG (harmony between the two emperors), Concordia standing half left, patera in right hand, long scepter vertical in left hand; scarce; SOLD










OBVERSE| LEGENDS|

PLAVTILLAAVG
PLAVTILLAAVGVSTA
PLAVTILLAEAVGVSTAE


REFERENCES|

Banti, A. & L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
The Barry P. Murphy Collection of Severan Denarii - http://bpmurphy.ancients.info/severan/severanhome.htm
Bickford-Smith, R. "The imperial mints in the east for Septimius Severus: it is time to begin a thorough reconsideration" in RIN XCVI (1994/1995), pp. 53-71.
Calic, E. The Roman Avrei, Vol. II: From Didius Julianus to Constantius I, 193 AD - 335 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Cayn, J. Los Sestercios del Imperio Romano, Vol. III: De Marco Aurelio a Caracalla (Del 161 d.C. al 217 d.C.). (Madrid, 1984).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappes sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 4: Septimius Severus to Maximinus Thrax. (Paris, 1884).
Mattingly, H., E. Sydenham & C. Sutherland. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol. IV: From Pertinax to Uranius Antoninus. (London, 1986).
Mattingly, H. & R. Carson. Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum, Vol. 5: Pertinax to Elagabalus. (London, 1950).
Online Coins of the Roman Empire (OCRE) - http://numismatics.org/ocre/
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. III. Pertinax to Aemilian. (Oxford, 1977).
Seaby, H. & Sear, D. Roman Silver Coins, Vol. III, Pertinax to Balbinus and Pupienus. (London, 1982).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. II: The Accession of Nerva to the Overthrow of the Severan Dynasty AD 96 - AD 235. (London, 2002).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

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