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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |The Severan Period||View Options:  |  |  | 

Roman Coins of Severan Period

Julia Mamaea, Augusta 13 March 222 - February or March 235 A.D.

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Vesta was originally a household spirit. Later she was personified as the goddess of the hearth and given the stature of her Greek equivalent, Hestia. In the temple of Vesta, her sacred flame was kept alive by Vestal Virgins. In 394, by order of the Christian emperor Theodosius I in his campaign to eliminate pagan practices in Rome, the fire of Vesta was extinguished.
RS92953. Silver denarius, RIC IV 360; RSC III 81; BMCRE VI p. 152, 381; Hunter III 7, SRCV II 8217, VF, nice portrait, well centered, porous, edge cracks, weight 2.156 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 226 A.D.; obverse IVLIA MAMAEA AVG, diademed and draped bust right; reverse VESTA, Vesta standing half-left, veiled head left, palladium in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand; $60.00 (€52.80)


Koinon of Macedonia, Portrait of Alexander the Great, 231 - 235 A.D.

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The Macedonian Koinon (community) was the political organization governing the autonomous Roman province of Macedonia and was responsible for issuing coinage. The individual cities, as members of the Koinon, sent representatives to participate in popular assembly several times each year. The high point of the year was celebrations and matches in honor of Alexander the Great and the Roman emperor held in Beroea (modern Verria) located about 75 km. west of Thessaloniki. This was the provincial center of the emperor cult, with the appropriate temple and privileges, first granted to the Koinon by Nerva. The title Neokoros, or "temple guardians" was highly prized and thus advertised on coins. Under Elagabalus, the Koinon received a second neokorie, indicated by B (the Greek number two) or rarely ∆IC (double in Greek). The title was rescinded but later restored by Severus Alexander, probably in 231 A.D.
GB92396. Bronze triassarion, AMNG III 341, RPC Online -, BMC Macedonia -, SNG Cop -, SNG Hunterian -, SNG Saroglos -, McClean -, Lindgren -, VF/F, near black patina, high points a bit flatly struck, light corrosion heavier at edge, central depressions, weight 9.353 g, maximum diameter 25.6 mm, die axis 180o, Macedonia, Beroea(?) mint, reign of Severus Alexander, 231 - 235; obverse AΛEΞAN∆POY clockwise on right, diademed head of Alexander the Great right; reverse KOINON MAKE∆ ONΩN NE (NE ligate), Zeus standing half left, head left, nude, thunderbolt in right hand, long scepter vertical in left hand; very rare; $300.00 (€264.00)


Severus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D., Nicomedia, Bithynia

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Nicomedia (Izmit, Turkey today) city of Bithynia on the Black Sea in Anatolia. It is described by ancient writers as a place of superior size and magnificence, ranking next to Rome, Alexandria, and Antioch in the splendor and beauty of its buildings; and was one which Diocletian studied to make the equal of Rome itself.
RP89882. Bronze assarion, RPC VI T3370 (same dies), SNGvA 7114, SNG Cop 576, Rec Gén 326, BMC Pontus -, F/VF, a little rough, tight flan, weight 3.704 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, die axis 225o, Nicomedia (Izmit, Turkey) mint, obverse M AVP CE AΛEΞAN∆POC AVΓ, laureate head right; reverse NIKO/MH-∆-E/Ω-N / TRPIC NEΩ/K (MH ligate), octastyle temple, pellet on pediment; $80.00 (€70.40)


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D., Nikopolis ad Istrum

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There are peculiarities about these Roman crescent and star reverse types that are difficult to understand. First, the crescents are almost always depicted with the horns up. The moon is never seen this way in the sky. Also, in the sky stars are never visible within the horns of the crescent moon because there they would be behind the shadowed yet solid and opaque orb. The crescent with horns up may represent a solar eclipse.
RP92881. Bronze assarion, H-H-J Nikopolis 8.14.48.37 (R2), Varbanov I 2474 var. (obv. leg.), AMNG I/I 1432, Moushmov 986, gVF, green patina, slightly off center, scratches, spot of corrosion on reverse, weight 2.928 g, maximum diameter 16.6 mm, die axis 180o, Nicopolis ad Istrum (Nikyup, Bulgaria) mint, 9 Apr 193 - 4 Feb 211 A.D.; obverse AY K Λ CEVHPOC, laureate head right; reverse NIKOΠOΛITΩN ΠPOC IC, five stars above and within crescent with horns upward; $80.00 (€70.40)


Geta, 209 - c. 26 December 211 A.D., Nikopolis ad Istrum, Moesia Inferior

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A star or stars within a crescent with horns up probably represents a solar eclipse.
RP92884. Bronze assarion, H-H-J Nikopolis 8.22.48.4 (R2), Varbanov I 3214 (R4), AMNG I/I 1646, Moushmov 1195, SNG Cop -, BMC Thrace -, VF, green patina, edge crack, reverse slightly off center, edge a little ragged, weight 3.056 g, maximum diameter 17.4 mm, die axis 0o, Nicopolis ad Istrum (Nikyup, Bulgaria) mint, as caesar, 198 - 209 A.D.; obverse Λ AYP KAI ΓETAC, draped bust right; reverse NIKOΠOΛITΩN ΠPOC I, five stars and crescent with horns up, three stars above, one star within, one star below; $90.00 (€79.20)


Elagabalus, 16 May 218 - 11 March 222 A.D., Pella, Macedonia

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Pan is depicted in the pose of the life-size marble statue known as the Barberini Faun (Drunken Satyr) in the Glyptothek in Munich. A Faun is the Roman equivalent of a Greek Satyr. The position of the right arm over the head was a classical artistic convention indicating sleep. The statue is believed to have once adorned Hadrian's Mausoleum. The historian Procopius recorded that during the siege of Rome in 537 the defenders had hurled down upon the Goths the statues adorning Hadrian's Mausoleum. When discovered, the statue was heavily damaged; the right leg, parts of both hands, and parts of the head were missing. Johann Winckelmann speculated that the place of discovery and the statue's condition suggested that it had been such a projectile.Barberini Faun

RP89875. Bronze AE 25, cf. SNG ANS 629 (younger, Caracalla?), Moushmov 6476 (syrnix in field), Varbanov 3732 (R4, same), AMNG -, SNG Cop -, SNG Hunt -, BMC -, Lindgren -, Choice gF/aVF, broad flan, nice green patina, light scratches and marks, scattered minor porosity, weight 9.863 g, maximum diameter 24.6 mm, die axis 180o, Pella mint, 16 May 218 - 11 Mar 222 A.D.; obverse IMP C M AVR ANTONINVS, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse CO IVL AVS PELLA (sic), Pan seated left on rock, nude, right hand raised to top of head, left forearm leaning on syrnix on rock behind; other than SNG ANS specimen, with an obscure legend and a much different portrait which we suspect is Caracalla, this type is unpublished in the standard references, there is one specimen on Coin Archives (attributed to Caracalla in error), Wildwinds lists this type but misidentified as Moushmov 6476; extremely rare; $120.00 (€105.60)


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.

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The first of Herakles' twelve labors, set by his cousin King Eurystheus, was to slay the Nemean lion and bring back its skin. It could not be killed with mortal weapons because its golden fur was impervious to attack. Its claws were sharper than swords and could cut through any armor. Herakles stunned the beast with his club and, using his immense strength, strangled it to death. During the fight, the lion bit off one of his fingers. After slaying the lion, he tried to skin it with a knife from his belt but failed. Wise Athena, noticing the hero's plight, told him to use one of the lion's own claws to skin the pelt.
RS92999. Silver denarius, RIC IV 97; RSC III 212; BMCRE V p. 55, 218; Hunter III 24; SRCV II 6284, VF, nice portrait, toned, well centered on a tight flan, flow lines, reverse die wear, edge cracks, weight 2.805 g, maximum diameter 17.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 197 A.D.; obverse L SEPT SEV PERT AVG IMP VIIII, laureate head right; reverse HERCVLI DEFENS, Hercules standing right, naked except for lion skin draped on left shoulder and arm, resting right hand on grounded club, bow in left hand; $90.00 (€79.20)


Severus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D.

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Mars was the god of war and also an agricultural guardian. He was the father of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome. In early Rome, he was second in importance only to Jupiter, and the most prominent of the military gods in the religion of the Roman army. Most of his festivals were held in March, the month named for him (Latin Martius), and in October, which began and ended the season for military campaigning and farming.
RS92935. Silver denarius, RIC IV 37, BMCRE VI 163, RSC III 251, cf. SRCV II 7890 (TR P COS, 222 A.D.), Hunter III -, EF, mint luster, flow lines, nice portrait, well centered, part of edge ragged, flan cracks, weight 2.643 g, maximum diameter 20.6 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 224 A.D.; obverse IMP C M AVR SEV ALEXAND AVG, laureate and draped bust right, seen from behind; reverse P M TR P III COS P P, Mars standing half left, wearing crested helmet and military garb, olive branch in right hand, inverted spear in left hand; ex Quadriga Ancients (2002); $100.00 (€88.00)


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.

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In ancient Roman religion and mythology, Liber ("the free one" also known as Liber Pater "the free Father") was a god of viticulture and wine, fertility and freedom. He was a patron deity of Rome's plebeians and was part of their Aventine Triad. His festival of Liberalia (March 17) became associated with free speech and the rights attached to coming of age. His cult and functions were increasingly associated with Romanized forms of the Greek Dionysus-Bacchus, whose mythology he came to share.
RS92845. Silver denarius, RIC IV 32 (S); RSC III 301; BMCRE V p. 31, 64; Hunter III 10; SRCV II 6307, aVF, tight flan, flow lines, scratches, edge cracks, weight 2.193 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 194 A.D.; obverse L SEPT SEV PERT AVG IMP III, laureate head right; reverse LIBERO PATRI, Liber (Bacchus) standing half left, nude but for chlamys over shoulder, pouring wine from oenochoe in right hand for panther at feet on left, thyrsus vertical behind in left hand; scarce; $130.00 (€114.40)


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.

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The reverse refers to victory over Niger. To obscure that this was a civil war, it is phrased as victory over Arabs and Adiabenians, who aided Niger's cause. This reverse was minted until 197 A.D. with the additional obverse legends ending in IMP VI (RIC IV 63A), IMP VII (RIC IV 64) and IMP VIII (RIC IV 76).
RS92846. Silver denarius, RIC IV 58; RSC III 48; BMCRE V p. 39, 107; Hunter III -, SRCV II -, VF, attractive portrait, toned, flow lines, tight flan, a few scratches, reverse die wear, weight 2.713 g, maximum diameter 17.2 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 195 A.D.; obverse L SEPT SEV PERT AVG IMP V, laureate head right; reverse ARAB ADIAB COS II P P, Victory walking left, raising wreath in right hand, trophy of arms in left hand; $120.00 (€105.60)











Catalog current as of Tuesday, October 22, 2019.
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Severan Period