Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome to Forum Ancient Coins!!! We Are Working From Home, Social Distancing, Wearing Masks, And Sanitizing To Pack Orders!!! Please Call Us If You Have Questions 252-646-1958 Expert Authentication - Accurate Descriptions - Reasonable Prices - Coins From Under $10 To Museum Quality Rarities Welcome to Forum Ancient Coins!!! We Are Working From Home, Social Distancing, Wearing Masks, And Sanitizing To Pack Orders!!! To Order By Phone Or Call With Questions Call 252-646-1958 Explore Our Website And Find Joy In The History, Numismatics, Art, Mythology, And Geography Of Coins!!!

× Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Recent Additions

Apr 21, 2021

Apr 20, 2021

Apr 19, 2021

Apr 18, 2021
Asian Coins

Apr 15, 2021

Apr 13, 2021
Asian Coins

Apr 12, 2021

Apr 06, 2021

Apr 05, 2021

Apr 04, 2021

Apr 03, 2021

Apr 02, 2021

Apr 01, 2021
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |The Severan Period||View Options:  |  |  | 

Roman Coins of Severan Period
Seleukid Kingdom, Seleucus I Nikator, 312 - 280 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Seleucus| |I| |Nikator,| |312| |-| |280| |B.C.||tetradrachm|NEW
Seleukos (Seleucus) founded the Seleukid Empire and the Seleukid dynasty which ruled Syria until Pompey made it a Roman province in 63 B.C. Seleukos was never one of Alexander the Great's principal generals but he commanded the royal bodyguard during the Indian campaign. In the division of the empire after Alexander's death Seleukos did not receive a satrapy. Instead, he served under the regent Perdikkas until the latter's murder in 321 or 320. Seleukos was then appointed satrap of Babylonia. Five years later Antigonus Monophthalmus (the One-eyed) forced him to flee, but he returned with support from Ptolemy. He later added Persia and Media to his territory and defeated both Antigonus and Lysimachus. He was succeeded by his son Antiochus I.
GY95974. Silver tetradrachm, cf. Houghton-Lorber I 177; Newell ESM 314; BMC Seleucid p. 3, 33 - 34; HGC 9 18c (R1-R2), aVF, high relief head of Zeus, old cabinet toning, flow lines, porosity, light marks, minor edge flaw on reverse, weight 16.251 g, maximum diameter 26.9 mm, die axis 180o, Susa (Shush, Iran) mint, c. 295 - 280 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Zeus right; reverse Athena driving biga of horned elephants, BAΣIΛEΩΣ (king) downward on left, ΣEΛEYKOY in exergue, spearhead (control) above right, A(or E or M over Ω?, obscure, control) lower right before elephants; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $1600.00 (€1472.00)


Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D., Antiocheia, Pisidia

|Pisidia|, |Julia| |Domna,| |Augusta| |194| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.,| |Antiocheia,| |Pisidia||AE| |22|NEW
Tyche (Greek for luck; the Roman equivalent was Fortuna) was the presiding tutelary deity that governed the fortune and prosperity of a city, its destiny. Increasingly during the Hellenistic period, cities had their own specific iconic version of Tyche, wearing a mural crown (a crown like the walls of the city).
RP93151. Bronze AE 22, Krzyzanowska XVII/-; SNG BnF 1127 var. (same obv. die, rev. leg. var.); SNG PfPs 47 var. (same); BMC Lycia p. 181, 34 var. (rev. leg.), VF, dark green patina, minor earthen deposits, small edge splits, weight 6.118 g, maximum diameter 21.6 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch in Pisidia (Yalvac, Turkey) mint, 194 - 8 Apr 217 A.D.; obverse IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust right; reverse ANTIOCH GEN CL CA, Tyche (Genius of the colony) standing slightly left, head left, kalathos on head, wearing long chiton and peplos, branch in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $130.00 (€119.60)


Elagabalus, 16 May 218 - 11 March 222 A.D., Antioch, Seleukis and Pieria, Syria

|Roman| |Syria|, |Elagabalus,| |16| |May| |218| |-| |11| |March| |222| |A.D.,| |Antioch,| |Seleukis| |and| |Pieria,| |Syria||AE| |19|NEW
The ruins of Antioch on the Orontes lie near the modern city of Antakya, Turkey. Founded near the end of the 4th century B.C. by Seleucus I Nicator, one of Alexander the Great's generals, Antioch's geographic, military and economic location, particularly the spice trade, the Silk Road, the Persian Royal Road, benefited its occupants, and eventually it rivaled Alexandria as the chief city of the Near East and as the main center of Hellenistic Judaism at the end of the Second Temple period. Antioch is called "the cradle of Christianity,” for the pivotal early role it played in the emergence of the faith. It was one of the four cities of the Syrian tetrapolis. Its residents are known as Antiochenes. Antioch was renamed Theoupolis after it was nearly destroyed by an earthquake on 29 November 528. Once a great metropolis of half a million people, it declined to insignificance during the Middle Ages because of warfare, repeated earthquakes and a change in trade routes following the Mongol conquests, which then no longer passed through Antioch from the far east. 6th Century Antioch
RY92567. Bronze AE 19, McAlee 782(a); Butcher 470; SNG Cop 243 var. (star vice diamond); BMC Galatia p. 203, 433 var. (same), F, black patina with highlighting natural red earthen deposits, tight flan, porosity, weight 4.869 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, obverse AVT KAI MAP AVP ANTΩNEINOC CE (or similar), laureate head right; reverse ∆ E (∆ EΠAPXEIΩN - "of the four eparchies") above, large S•C (senatus consulto), eagle with spread wings and head right below, all within laurel wreath closed at the top with a diamond (containing pellet?); from the Errett Bishop Collection; $60.00 (€55.20)


Elagabalus, 16 May 218 - 11 March 222 A.D., Samosata, Commagene

|Roman| |Syria|, |Elagabalus,| |16| |May| |218| |-| |11| |March| |222| |A.D.,| |Samosata,| |Commagene||AE| |32|NEW
Samosata was an ancient city on the right (west) bank of the Euphrates whose ruins existed at the modern city of Samsat, Adiyaman Province, Turkey until the site was flooded by the newly constructed Atatürk Dam. The founder of the city was Sames, a Satrap of Commagene who made it his capital. The city was sometimes called Antiochia in Commagene and served as the capital for the Hellenistic Kingdom of Commagene from c. 160 BC until it was surrendered to Rome in 72. A civil metropolis from the days of Emperor Hadrian, Samosata was the home of the Legio VI Ferrata and later Legio XVI Flavia Firma, and the terminus of several military roads. Seven Christian martyrs were crucified in 297 in Samosata for refusing to perform a pagan rite in celebration of the victory of Maximian over the Sassanids. It was at Samosata that Julian II had ships made in his expedition against Sapor, and it was a natural crossing-place in the struggle between Heraclius and Chosroes in the 7th century.
RY92574. Bronze AE 32, SNG Cop 22, Butcher p. 474, 29, BMC Galatia -; SNG Righetti -, SNG München -, Lindgren-Kovacs -, F, contrasting light and dark tone, porosity, areas of mild corrosion, scratches, weight 14.659 g, maximum diameter 31.5 mm, die axis 0o, Samosata (site now flooded by the Atatürk Dam) mint, 16 Mar 218 - 11 Mar 222 A.D.; obverse AYT K M K AY ANTΩNINOC CEC, laureate bust right, slight drapery on left shoulder; reverse CAMOCATEΩN, Tyche seated left on rocks, wearing turreted crown, two stalks of grain in right hand, no eagle perched on wrist, Pegasos below flying left; from the Errett Bishop Collection, BIG 31.5 mm bronze!; very rare; $180.00 (€165.60)


Severus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D.

|Severus| |Alexander|, |Severus| |Alexander,| |13| |March| |222| |-| |March| |235| |A.D.||denarius|
Salus was the Roman goddess of health. She was Hygieia to the Greeks, who believed her to be the daughter of Aesculapius, the god of medicine and healing, and Epione, the goddess of soothing of pain. Her father Asclepius learned the secrets of keeping death at bay after observing one snake bringing another snake healing herbs. Woman seeking fertility, the sick, and the injured slept in his temples in chambers where non-poisonous snakes were left to crawl on the floor and provide healing.
RS96928. Silver denarius, RIC IV 298 var. (star rev. left), RSC III 535c var. (same), BMCRE VI 1014 var. (same); SRCV II 7926 var. (same), Hunter III -, VF, superb portrait, light toning, flow lines, spotty dark deposits, die wear, off center, flan split/cracks, weight 3.093 g, maximum diameter 19.6 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 223 A.D.; obverse IMP C M AVR SEV ALEXAND AVG, laureate, draped, cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse SALVS PVBLICA (health of the public), Salus seated left on throne, feeding snake coiling up from altar from patera in right hand, left elbow resting on throne; Salus without star from Antioch (limited 223 A.D. issue) is missing from all the primary references but we know of a few other specimens from auctions; very rare; $170.00 (€156.40)


Julia Mamaea, Augusta 13 March 222 - February or March 235 A.D.

|Julia| |Domna|, |Julia| |Mamaea,| |Augusta| |13| |March| |222| |-| |February| |or| |March| |235| |A.D.||sestertius|
Hera (Juno to the Romans) is the wife and one of three sisters of Zeus in the Olympian pantheon of Greek mythology and religion. Hera's mother is Rhea and her father Cronus. Her chief function was as the goddess of women and marriage. The cow, lion and the peacock were considered sacred to her. Portrayed as majestic and solemn, often enthroned, and crowned with the kalathos. Hera was known for her jealous and vengeful nature against Zeus' lovers and offspring, but also against mortals who crossed her. Paris earned Hera's hatred by choosing Aphrodite as the most beautiful goddess.
RB92608. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV SA683, BMCRE VI SA759, Hunter III 38, Cohen IV 33, SRCV II 8230, VF, rough green patina, patina flaking, porosity, earthen deposits, edge cracks, weight 21.460 g, maximum diameter 32.1 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, c. 231 A.D.; obverse IVLIA MAMAEA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, wearing stephane; reverse IVNO AVGVSTAE, Juno seated left, flower in right hand, swathed infant in crook of left arm, S C (senatus consulto) in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $140.00 (€128.80)


Macrinus, 11 April 217 - 8 June 218 A.D., Gabala, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria

|Roman| |Syria|, |Macrinus,| |11| |April| |217| |-| |8| |June| |218| |A.D.,| |Gabala,| |Seleucis| |and| |Pieria,| |Syria||AE| |24|
Gabula was important enough in the Roman province of Syria Prima to be a Metropolitan Archdiocese in the sway of the Patriarchate of Antioch (the provincial capital Antioch on the Orontes), but was to fade, presumably at the advent of Islam.
RY92570. Bronze AE 24, SNG Cop 316; SNG Hunterian II 3244; Lindgren III 1192; SNG Munchen 835; BMC Galatia p. 246, 20 var. (laureate head), VF, dark green patina, highlighting earthen deposits, tight flan cutting off much of legends, porous, weight 8.847 g, maximum diameter 24.4 mm, die axis 15o, Gabala (Jableh, Syria) mint, 11 Apr 217 - 8 Jun 218 A.D.; obverse AV K M O C MAKPEINOC CE, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse ΓABAΛEWN, Tyche seated left, wearing chiton, peplos and modius, rudder held by tiller on right hand, cornucopia in left hand; from the Errett Bishop Collection; scarce; $100.00 (€92.00)


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D. "Limes" Denarius

|Septimius| |Severus|, |Septimius| |Severus,| |9| |April| |193| |-| |4| |February| |211| |A.D.| |"Limes"| |Denarius||limes| |denarius|
The origin and purpose of the bronze "limes" denarii is uncertain. They may have been a token currency used only along the borders of the Empire.
RS97497. Bronze limes denarius, cf. RIC IV 150, RSC III 454, BMCRE V p. 189, 175; Hunter III 39, SRCV II 6333 (silver, Rome mint), F, nice dark green patina, scratches, some light corrosion, weight 2.716 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 0o, uncertain mint, 198 - 200 A.D.; obverse SEVERVS AVG PART MAX, laureate head right; reverse P M TR P VIII COS II P P, Victory flying left, holding open wreath with both hands, shield set on low base lower left; $50.00 (€46.00)


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D., Stobi, Macedonia

|Stobi|, |Caracalla,| |28| |January| |198| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.,| |Stobi,| |Macedonia||AE| |24|
Stobi (now Gradsko, Macedonia) was an ancient town of Paeonia, conquered by Macedonia, and later made the capital of the Roman province of Macedonia Salutaris. Stobi prospered under Rome and in 69 A.D. was designated a municipium. Citizens of Stobi enjoyed Ius Italicum and were citizens of Rome.
RP97500. Bronze AE 24, Josifovski Stobi 391 (V87/R103), Varbanov III 3992 (R3), Mionnet Supp. III 704, BMC Macedonia -, SNG Cop -, SNG ANS -, F, well centered, scratches, scrapes, reverse die damage on reverse, weight 6.776 g, maximum diameter 23.8 mm, die axis 45o, Stobi mint, c. 211 - 217 A.D.; obverse PIVS AVGV ANTONINVS, laureate bearded head right; reverse MVNIC STOBE, Victory advancing right, wreath extended in right, palm frond in left hand over left shoulder; $50.00 (€46.00)


Severus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D., Caesarea, Cappadocia

|Cappadocia|, |Severus| |Alexander,| |13| |March| |222| |-| |March| |235| |A.D.,| |Caesarea,| |Cappadocia||AE| |22|
Kayseri, Turkey was originally named Mazaca. It was renamed Eusebia by Ariarathes V Eusebes, King of Cappadocia, 163 - 130 B.C. The last king of Cappadocia, King Archelaus, renamed it "Caesarea in Cappadocia" to honor Caesar Augustus upon his death in 14 A.D. Muslim Arabs slightly modified the name into Kaisariyah, which became Kayseri when the Seljuk Turks took control, c. 1080 A.D.
RP93140. Bronze AE 22, Ganschow 843d; RPC Online VI T6853; SNG Cop 301; BMC Galatia p. 92, 338; Lindgren A1725A; Sydenham Caesarea 596 var. (AΛEΞAN∆), aVF, porous/rough, reverse off center, weight 6.099 g, maximum diameter 21.5 mm, die axis 180o, Caesarea mint, 228 - 229 A.D.; obverse AYK CEOV AΛEΞAN, laureate head right; reverse MHTPOΠ KAICA, three double-head stalks of grain tied together, ET-H (year) divided across bottom; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $60.00 (€55.20)











Catalog current as of Wednesday, April 21, 2021.
Page created in 0.937 seconds.
All coins are guaranteed for eternity