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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |The Severan Period||View Options:  |  |  | 

Roman Coins of Severan Period

Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D.

|Julia| |Domna|, |Julia| |Domna,| |Augusta| |194| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.|, |denarius|
Pudicitia, modesty and chastity, was for Romans the highest regarded female virtue. For an unmarried girl, pudicitia meant virginity. For a wife, it meant faithfulness and devotion to her husband. Romans loved the story of Arria, an ultimate example of Roman pudicitia. When the emperor Claudius ordered her husband Paetus to end his own life, he hesitated. Arria took his dagger and stabbed herself to set an example, saying, "Paetus, it doesn't hurt."
RS94713. Silver denarius, RIC IV S576, RSC III 168, BMCRE V S74, Hunter III 29, SRCV II -, Choice gVF, lovely portrait, well centered, light flow lines, some porosity, edge cracks, weight 1.808 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 193 - 196 A.D.; obverse IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust right; reverse PVDICITA, Pudicitia enthroned left, veiled, right hand on breast, left elbow resting on back of throne; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $120.00 SALE |PRICE| $108.00


Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D.

|Julia| |Domna|, |Julia| |Domna,| |Augusta| |194| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.|, |denarius|
Pudicitia, modesty and chastity, was for Romans the highest regarded female virtue. For an unmarried girl, pudicitia meant virginity. For a wife, it meant faithfulness and devotion to her husband. Romans loved the story of Arria, an ultimate example of Roman pudicitia. When the emperor Claudius ordered her husband Paetus to end his own life, he hesitated. Arria took his dagger and stabbed herself to set an example, saying, "Paetus, it doesn't hurt."
RS94714. Silver denarius, RIC IV S576, RSC III 168, BMCRE V S74., Hunter III 29, SRCV II -, VF, well centered, flow lines, a little rough and porous, edge a little ragged, weight 3.180 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 45o, Rome mint, 193 - 196 A.D.; obverse IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust right; reverse PVDICITA, Pudicitia enthroned left, veiled, right hand on breast, left elbow resting on back of throne; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $60.00 SALE |PRICE| $54.00


Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D.

|Julia| |Domna|, |Julia| |Domna,| |Augusta| |194| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.|, |denarius|
Laodicea ad Mare is today Latakia, Syria. It was a Phoenician town, refounded by Seleucus I Nicator 301-281 B.C. and renamed after his mother, Laodicea. Coins of Julia Domna from the Laodicea mint can be identified by the loop coming up from her drapery at the neck.
RS94711. Silver denarius, RIC IV S637, RSC III 21, BMCRE V S593, SRCV II 6577, Hunter III 63, VF, lovely portrait, well centered, much of obverse legend unstruck probably due to a filled die, reverse die worn, weight 2.209 g, maximum diameter 18.6 mm, die axis 180o, Laodicea ad Mare (Latakia, Syria) mint, 196 - 202 A.D.; obverse IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust right; reverse CONCORDIA (harmony), Concordia seated left, patera in extended right hand, cornucopia in left hand; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $60.00 SALE |PRICE| $54.00


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.

|Septimius| |Severus|, |Septimius| |Severus,| |9| |April| |193| |-| |4| |February| |211| |A.D.|, |sestertius|
This type was issued to commemorate victory in Britain. Between 208 and 210 A.D., Septimius Severus and his son Caracalla campaigned into Scotland (then Caledonia) and also restored Hadrian's Wall. The victories in the north pacified the island for the remainder of the century, but the aged Septimius died at Eburacum (York) in 211 A.D.
RB93001. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV 796 (R); Hunter III 164; Cohen IV 547; SRCV II 6430; BMCRE V p. 393, 185 var. (slight drapery), aF, corrosion, a few deep cuts, scratches, flan crack, light deposits, weight 21.379 g, maximum diameter 30.1 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 210 A.D.; obverse L SEPT SEVERVS PIVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse P M TR P XVIII COS III P P S C, two Victories standing facing each other, attaching round shield to palm tree, two British captives seated back to back at the base of the palm, each wearing tunic and peaked cap; rare; $150.00 SALE |PRICE| $135.00


Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D.

|Julia| |Domna|, |Julia| |Domna,| |Augusta| |194| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.|, |as|
Felicitas was the goddess or personification of happiness, good fortune, and success. She played an important role in Rome's state religion during the empire and was frequently portrayed on coins. She became a prominent symbol of the wealth and prosperity of the Roman Empire.
RB92964. Copper as, RIC IV S870 (S), BMCRE V S781, SRCV II 6636, Cohen IV 19, Hunter III -, aF, rough with corrosion, edge flaws, weight 9.350 g, maximum diameter 25.4 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 196 - 211 A.D.; obverse IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust right with hair waved and coiled at back; reverse CERES, Ceres standing front, head to left, holding grain-ears over modius with her right hand and scepter with her left, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field below center; $20.00 SALE |PRICE| $18.00


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D.

|Caracalla|, |Caracalla,| |28| |January| |198| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.|, |denarius|
Fides is the Roman goddess or deification of good faith, fidelity, loyalty, and honesty.
RS92973. Silver denarius, RIC IV 8 (S); RSC III 83; BMCRE V p. 54, - (notes 7 specimens in Reka-Devnia hoard); SRCV II -; Hunter III -, VF, well centered, nice youth portrait, flow lines, edge split, weight 2.664 g, maximum diameter 17.3 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 198 A.D.; obverse M AVR ANTON CAES PONTIF, boy's bare head and draped bust right, seen from behind; reverse FIDES PVBLICA, Fides standing half left, heads of grain in right hand, raising basket of fruit in left hand; ex Quadriga Ancients; scarce; $80.00 SALE |PRICE| $72.00


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.

|Septimius| |Severus|, |Septimius| |Severus,| |9| |April| |193| |-| |4| |February| |211| |A.D.|, |denarius|
Pax, regarded by the ancients as a goddess, was worshiped not only at Rome but also at Athens. Her altar could not be stained with blood. Claudius began the construction of a magnificent temple to her honor, which Vespasian finished, in the Via Sacra. The attributes of Peace are the hasta pura, the olive branch, the cornucopia, and often the caduceus. Sometimes she is represented setting fire to a pile of arms.
RS94132. Silver denarius, RIC IV 118; RSC III 357; BMCRE V p. 61, W253; SRCV II 6319; Hunter III -, F, light corrosion and marks, edge cracks, weight 2.739 g, maximum diameter 17.3 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 198 A.D.; obverse L SEP SEV PERT AVG IMP X, laureate head right; reverse PACI AETERNAE (eternal peace), Pax seated left, olive branch in extended right hand, long scepter transverse in left hand; $40.00 SALE |PRICE| $36.00


Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D.

|Julia| |Domna|, |Julia| |Domna,| |Augusta| |194| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.|, |denarius|
Lucifer means lightbringer, from the Latin lux light and ferre to bear or bring. The word Lucifer is found in only one place in the Bible -- Isaiah 14:12 -- but only in the King James and related versions: How art thou fallen from heaven, O Lucifer, son of the morning! The King James Version is based on the Vulgate, the Latin translation of Jerome. Jerome translated the Hebrew helel (bright or brilliant one) as lucifer, which was a reasonable Latin equivalent. And yet it is this lucifer, the bright one or lightbearer, that came to be understood by so many as the name for Satan, Lord of Darkness.
RS94134. Silver denarius, RIC IV C373a; RSC III 32; BMCRE V p. 430, C1; Hunter III p. 98, C1; SRCV II 7100, aF, dark tone, rough, weight 2.407 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, reign of Caracalla, c. 214 A.D.; obverse IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG, draped bust right; reverse DIANA LVCIFERA (light bringing Diana), Diana Lucifera standing facing, head left, holding flaming long torch transverse left with both hands; $36.00 SALE |PRICE| $32.40


Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D.

|Julia| |Domna|, |Julia| |Domna,| |Augusta| |194| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.|, |denarius|
Julia Domna was born in Emesa (now Homs), Syria in 170 A.D. She was the youngest daughter of high-priest Julius Bassianus, a descendant of the Royal House of Emesa. Emesa was famous for its Temple of the Sun, the center of worship for the ancient pagan cult El-Gebal (or Elagabal). El-Gebal, worshiped in the form of a conical black stone, was the Aramaic name for the Syrian Sun God and means God of the Mountain. Emesa was also the birthplace of three other Roman empresses, Julia Maesa, Julia Mamaea and Julia Soaemias, and one emperor, Julia Domna's nephew, Elagabalus.
RS92345. Silver denarius, RIC IV S627 (S); RSC III 103; BMCRE V p. 104, 418; SRCV II 6591, F, off center, minor encrustations, edge cracks, weight 3.225 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 180o, Emesa (Homs, Syria) mint, 194 - 195 A.D.; obverse IVLIA DOMNA AVG, draped bust right; reverse LIBERAL ē AVG, Liberalitas standing slightly left, polos or kalathos on head, counting board in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; only one sale in the last two decades recorded on Coin Archives (an ex Forum coin!); rare; $300.00 SALE |PRICE| $270.00


Geta, 209 - c. 26 December 211 A.D.

|Geta|, |Geta,| |209| |-| |c.| |26| |December| |211| |A.D.|, |denarius|
The palladium, a small figure of Minerva (Pallas Athena) holding a spear and shield, had a mythological origin from Troy. Troy was believed to be safe from foreign enemies as long as the Palladium remained within the city walls. But Odysseus and Diomedes stole the image and soon after the Greeks took the city. The Palladium was later taken by Aeneas to Rome where for centuries it was kept in the temple of Vesta in the Forum. In Late Antiquity, it was rumored that Constantine had taken the Palladium to Constantinople and buried it under the Column of Constantine.
RS92489. Silver denarius, RIC IV 13a (S); RSC III 90; BMCRE p. 197, 223; Hunter III 7; SRCV II 7184, VF, well centered, toned, flow lines, bumps and scratches, die wear, edge cracks, weight 3.260 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, as caesar, 199 A.D.; obverse P SEPT GETA CAES PONT, boy's bare-headed and draped bust right; reverse NOBILITAS, Nobilitas standing slightly right, head right, long scepter vertical in right hand, palladium in left hand; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $90.00 SALE |PRICE| $81.00











Catalog current as of Tuesday, February 25, 2020.
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Severan Period