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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |The Adoptive Emperors| ▸ |Crispina||View Options:  |  |  | 

Crispina, wife of Commodus, Augusta 178 - 182 A.D.

Crispina was married to emperor Commodus in 177A.D., in an effort to foster some virtue in the young Caesar. Unfortunately, Crispina was a vain and haughty, if beautiful, and did little to improve Commodus' character. She was implicated in a plot to kill Commodus in 182. She was exiled to Capri with Lucilla and murdered soon after.


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Salus was the Roman goddess of health. She was Hygieia to the Greeks, who believed her to be the daughter of Aesculapius, the god of medicine and healing, and Epione, the goddess of soothing of pain. Her father Asclepius learned the secrets of keeping death at bay after observing one snake bringing another snake healing herbs. Woman seeking fertility, the sick, and the injured slept in his temples in chambers where non-poisonous snakes were left to crawl on the floor and provide healing.
RB92470. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC III 672a (S), BMCRE IV 422, Hunter II 39, Cohen III 33, SRCV II 6010, aVF, well centered, rough corrosion, weight 24.720 g, maximum diameter 31.6 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 180 - 182 A.D.; obverse CRISPINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair knotted in a coiled bun in back; reverse SALVS, Salus seated left, from patera in right hand feeding snake coiled around column altar at feet on left, left forearm on back of chair, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking low across field; from the Errett Bishop Collection; scarce; $100.00 (88.00)


Crispina, Wife of Commodus, Augusta 178 - 182 A.D.

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Venus (Aphrodite) can be faulted for the Trojan War. Upset that she was not invited to a wedding, she went anyway and maliciously left a golden apple inscribed "For the fairest" on the banquet table. The goddesses, as Aphrodite expected, argued who was the rightful possessor of this prize. It was determined the most handsome mortal in the world, a noble Trojan youth named Paris, would decide. Each of the three finalists offered Paris a bribe. Hera promised he would rule the world. Athena said she would make him victorious in battle. Aphrodite guaranteed the love of the most beautiful woman in the world. This was Helen, who was married to the king of Sparta. Paris awarded the golden apple to Aphrodite. Aphrodite enabled Paris to elope with Helen, Helen of Troy. Helen's husband raised a Greek army to retrieve his wife, starting the Trojan War.
RS86693. Silver denarius, RIC III Commodus 288 (S), RSC II 39a, BMCRE IV 50, MIR 21, Hunter II 15, SRCV II 6003, Choice gVF, excellent portrait, well centered and struck, attractive toning, flan edge a bit ragged with many small cracks, weight 2.716 g, maximum diameter 19.3 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 180 - 182 A.D.; obverse CRISPINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair in round coil low at back; reverse VENVS FELIX, Venus seated left on throne without back, Victory in right hand, long grounded scepter vertical in left hand; from the Jyrki Muona Collection, ex Ancient Coin Art; scarce; SOLD


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This type invokes the Gods of Childbirth, however, there is no record of the offspring from Commodus and Crispina.
RS06925. Silver denarius, RIC III 281 (R), RSC II 15, Hunter II 3, BMCRE IV 31, SRCV II 5999 var. (AVGVSTA), EF, weight 3.31 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 320o, Rome mint, 180 - 182 A.D.; obverse CRISPINA AVG, draped bust right; reverse DIS GENITALIBVS, square altar or altar enclosure; rare; SOLD










OBVERSE| LEGENDS|

CRISPINAAVG
CRISPINAAVGIMPCOMMODIAVG
CRISPINAAVGVSTA


REFERENCES|

Banti, A. & L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Calic, E. The Roman Avrei, Vol. I: From the Republic to Pertinax, 196 BC - 193 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Cayn, J. Los Sestercios del Imperio Romano, Vol. III: De Marco Aurelio a Caracalla (Del 161 d.C. al 217 d.C.). (Madrid, 1984).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappes sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 3: Marcus Aurelius to Clodius Albinus. (Paris, 1883).
Mattingly, H. & E. Sydenham. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol. III: Antoninus Pius to Commodus. (London, 1930).
Mattingly, H. & R. Carson. Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum, Vol. 4: Antoninus Pius to Commodus. (London, 1940).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet. II. Trajan to Commodus (London, 1971).
Szaivert, W. Die Mnzprgung der Kaiser Marcus Aurelius, Lucius Verus un Commodus (161-192). (Wien, 1984).
Seaby, H. & R. Loosley. Roman Silver Coins, Vol. II: Tiberius to Commodus. (London, 1979).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. II: The Accession of Nerva to the Overthrow of the Severan Dynasty AD 96 - AD 235. (London, 2002).
Toynbee, J.M.C. Roman medallions. ANSNS 5. (New York, 1944).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

Catalog current as of Tuesday, October 15, 2019.
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Roman Coins of Crispina