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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |The Adoptive Emperors| ▸ |Hadrian||View Options:  |  |  |   

Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

Hadrian, one of the "Five Good Emperors," abandoned the expansionist policy of Trajan and established a policy of defense and consolidation during which Hadrian's Wall in Britain was constructed. He traveled to nearly every province of the Empire, more than any other emperor, often ordering grandiose building programs to improve infrastructure and the quality of life in those regions. An ardent admirer of Greece, he sought to make Athens the cultural capital of the Empire and ordered the construction of many opulent temples in the city. He spent much of his time with the military; usually wore military attire and even dined and slept amongst the soldiers. He ordered military training and drilling to be more rigorous and made use of false reports of attack to keep the army alert. He suppressed the Bar Kokhba revolt in Judaea, renaming the province Syria Palaestina.Roman Empire 125 AD

Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Caesarea, Cappadocia

|Cappadocia|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.,| |Caesarea,| |Cappadocia||hemidrachm|NEW
Kayseri, Turkey was originally named Mazaca. It was renamed Eusebia by Ariarathes V Eusebes, King of Cappadocia, 163 - 130 B.C. The last king of Cappadocia, King Archelaus, renamed it "Caesarea in Cappadocia" to honor Caesar Augustus upon his death in 14 A.D. Muslim Arabs slightly modified the name into Kaisariyah, which became Kayseri when the Seljuk Turks took control, c. 1080 A.D.
RS110686. Silver hemidrachm, Metcalf Cappadocia 85; Sydenham Caesarea 257; BMC Galatia p. 62, 143; SNG Cop 223; SNG Fitzwilliam 5449; SNG Tbingen 4643, VF, porous, die wear, weight 1.618 g, maximum diameter 14.4 mm, die axis 0o, Cappadocia, Caesarea (Kayseri, Turkey) mint, 120 - 121 A.D.; obverse AYTO KAIC TPAI A∆PIANOC CEBACT, laureate bust right, slight drapery on far shoulder; reverse club, ET - (year 4) divided across field; $70.00 (70.70)


|Hadrian|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.||dupondius|NEW
Hadrian abandoned Trajan's expansionist policy and established a policy of defense and consolidation. Hadrian's Wall in Britain was part of this defense. He traveled more than any other emperor. His grandiose building programs improved the infrastructure and quality of life.
RB110693. Orichalcum dupondius, RIC II-3 614, BMC III 1225, Hunter II 343, Strack II 540, Cohen II 784 var. (TRAIANVS), SRCV II -, aVF/F, green-brown patina, porosity, marks, weight 12.321 g, maximum diameter 26.3 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 121 - 123 B.C.; obverse IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG P M TR P COS III, radiate head right; reverse FORTVNAE REDVCI, Fortuna seated left, rudder in right hand held by tiller, cornucopia in left hand, S - C (senatus consulto) in exergue; $130.00 (131.30)


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Gerasa, Decapolis, Arabia

|Decapolis,| |Arabia| |&| |Syria|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.,| |Gerasa,| |Decapolis,| |Arabia||AE| |15|NEW
Jerash, Jordan is north of the national capital Amman. Inhabited since the Bronze Age, its known for the ruins of the walled Greco-Roman city Gerasa just outside the modern city. Josephus mentions the city as being principally inhabited by Syrians, but also having a small Jewish community. In 106, Jerash was absorbed into the Roman province of Arabia, which included Philadelphia (modern day Amman). Jerash is considered one of the largest and most well-preserved sites of Roman architecture outside of Italy. It is sometimes referred to as the "Pompeii of the Middle East" due to its size, extent of excavation and level of preservation.Gerasa
RP110795. Bronze AE 15, RPC Online III 4087 (10 spec.), Sofaer p. 172 & pl. 143, 7 (same dies); SNG Righetti 2533 (same); Spijkerman 6 (same), Rosenberger 9 (same); SNG ANS -, aF, green patina, earthen deposits, corrosion, weight 2.722 g, maximum diameter 14.8 mm, die axis 0o, Gerasa mint, 129 - 130 A.D.; obverse AYT K TPA A∆PIANOC C, laureate head right, ID (year 14 below); reverse APTEMI TYXH ΓEPACWN (Artemis Tyche of the people of Gerasa), draped bust of Artemis-Tyche right, hair knotted with taenia behind, bow before, quiver on left shoulder; $40.00 (40.40)


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Petra, Arabia

|Roman| |Arabia|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.,| |Petra,| |Arabia||AE| |25|NEW
At the end of the narrow gorge, the Siq, stands Petra's most elaborate ruin, popularly known as Al-Khazneh ("the Treasury"), hewn into the sandstone cliff. While remaining in remarkably preserved condition, the face of the structure is marked by hundreds of bullet holes made by the local Bedouin tribes that hoped to dislodge riches that were once rumored to be hidden within it. A little farther from the Treasury, at the foot of the mountain called en-Nejr, is a massive theater, positioned so as to bring the greatest number of tombs within view. At the point where the valley opens out into the plain, the site of the city is revealed with striking effect. The theater was cut into the hillside and into several of the tombs during its construction. Rectangular gaps in the seating are still visible. Almost enclosing it on three sides are rose-colored mountain walls, divided into groups by deep fissures and lined with knobs cut from the rock in the form of towers.Theater
RP110803. Bronze AE 25, RPC Online III 4104; Rosenberger I 2; Sofaer 4; Spijkerman 4, SNG ANS 1364; BMC Arabia p. 35, 8, aF, some legend unstruck/off flan, porous, weight 10.641 g, maximum diameter 25.0 mm, die axis 180o, Petra (Jordan) mint, 11 Aug 117 - 10 Jul 138 A.D.; obverse AVTOKPATΩP KAICAP TPAIANOC A∆IANOC CEBACTOC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse A∆PIANH ΠETPA MHTPOΠOΛIC, Tyche seated left on rocks, wearing turreted crown, veil, long chiton and mantel, extending open right hand, trophy of arms in left hand over left shoulder; $25.00 (25.25)


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Tiberias, Galilee, Judaea

|Roman| |Judea| |&| |Palestina|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.,| |Tiberias,| |Galilee,| |Judaea||AE| |18|NEW
Tiberias, on the western shore of the Sea of Galilee, was founded by Herod Antipas in 20 A.D., named in honor of the Roman emperor Tiberius. Tiberias was the capital of Galilee and for Herod Antipas. Tiberias is mentioned in John 6:23, after Jesus' miraculous feeding of 5000, a crowd seeking Jesus took boats from Tiberius across the lake. Tiberias did not participate in the Bar Kokhba revolt. Following the expulsion of Jews from Jerusalem and most of Judaea after 135, Tiberias and its neighbor Sepphoris became the major Jewish cultural centers. The Mishna and Talmud were both finished at Tiberias.
RP110770. Bronze AE 18, RPC Online III 3934; De Saulcy 2; Kindler 8; BMC 32; SNG ANS 1112; Sofaer 12; Rosenberger III 14; AUB 14, aVF, encrustation, edge split, a few pits, weight 4.496 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 0o, Galilee, Tiberias (Israel) mint, 118 - 119 A.D.; obverse AYT TP A∆PIANW KAIC CEB, laureate bust of Hadrian right, aegis on shoulder; reverse TIBEP KΛAY, Nike standing facing, head left, wreath in right hand, palm frond in left, L - AP (year 101) low across field; $70.00 (70.70)


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Petra, Arabia

|Roman| |Arabia|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.,| |Petra,| |Arabia||AE| |22|NEW
At the end of the narrow gorge, the Siq, stands Petra's most elaborate ruin, popularly known as Al-Khazneh ("the Treasury"), hewn into the sandstone cliff. While remaining in remarkably preserved condition, the face of the structure is marked by hundreds of bullet holes made by the local Bedouin tribes that hoped to dislodge riches that were once rumored to be hidden within it. A little farther from the Treasury, at the foot of the mountain called en-Nejr, is a massive theater, positioned so as to bring the greatest number of tombs within view. At the point where the valley opens out into the plain, the site of the city is revealed with striking effect. The theater was cut into the hillside and into several of the tombs during its construction. Rectangular gaps in the seating are still visible. Almost enclosing it on three sides are rose-colored mountain walls, divided into groups by deep fissures and lined with knobs cut from the rock in the form of towers.Theater
RP110776. Bronze AE 22, RPC Online III 4105 (13 spec.); SNG ANS 6 1366; SNG Righetti 2544; Spijkerman 8; BMC Arabia p. 35, 9; Rosenberger I 7, Choice F, well centered, near black patina, highlighting reddish earthen fill, remnants of flan casting sprues, weight 6.925 g, maximum diameter 22.1 mm, die axis 180o, Petra (Jordan) mint, 117 - 138 A.D.; obverse AVTOKPATΩP KAICAP TPAIANOC A∆PIANOC CEBACTOC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse A∆PIANH ΠETPA MHTPOΠOΛIC, turreted, veiled, and draped bust of Tyche right; $100.00 (101.00)


|Hadrian|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.||semis|NEW
Most references list this type as a quadrans but examples without patina appear to be orichalcum (brass) vice copper. Yellow brass indicates the type is a semis. This coin has a near black patina, which is more common on brass than on bronze or copper, and the few spots of bare metal do look to be brass.
RP111021. Orichalcum semis, RIC II-3 624, BMCRE III 1279, Cohen II 1167, SRCV II 3704, Strack 579, Hunter II 380 var. (standing left, head right), VF, porous, small edge split, weight 3.224 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, Rome mint, 120 - 123 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, eagle standing half right, head turned left, wings open but not spread; reverse P M TR P COS III, horizontal winged thunderbolt, S C (senatus consulto) below; $70.00 (70.70)


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Caesarea Maritima, Samaria, Judaea

|Judaea| |&| |Palestine|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.,| |Caesarea| |Maritima,| |Samaria,| |Judaea||AE| |21|
Caesarea, about 30 miles north of Joppa and about 70 miles northwest of Jerusalem, was the capital of the Roman province of Judaea, the seat of the procurators, and the headquarters of the Roman troops. It was founded by Herod the Great and named after Caesar Augustus. This city is the location of the 1961 discovery of the Pilate Stone, the only archaeological item that mentions the Roman prefect Pontius Pilate, by whose order Jesus was crucified. Its ruins are a national park on the Mediterranean coast of Israel, about halfway between Tel Aviv and Haifa.
JD111119. Bronze AE 21, RPC III 3961; SNG ANS 771; SNG Cop 6; Kadman Caesarea 29; Rosenberger II 25; Sofaer 31; BMC Palestine p. 21, 69; De Saulcy 2, Baramki AUB 23, aF/F, green patina, off center on an oval flan, earthen encrustation, porosity, weight 4.835 g, maximum diameter 20.5 mm, die axis 0o, Caesarea Maritima (Keisaria, Israel) mint, 11 Aug 117 - 10 Jul 138 A.D.; obverse IMP TRA HADRIANO CAE, laureate and draped bust right; reverse C I F AVG CAESAR (Colonia Prima Flavia Augusta Caesarea), Apollo standing left, nude but for chlamys around neck and over left arm, extending right hand to snake rising up before him, resting left elbow on tripod lebes behind; $50.00 (50.50)


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Caesarea Maritima, Samaria, Judaea

|Judaea| |&| |Palestine|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.,| |Caesarea| |Maritima,| |Samaria,| |Judaea||AE| |13|
The destruction of Jerusalem in the First Jewish War made Caesarea, with a population above 125,000 and the hub of the road network, the economic and political hub of Palaestina. Caesarea was again the marshalling point for the Roman army during the reign of Hadrian for the Bar Kochba War, 132 - 136. Hadrian himself visited the city in 130 and again in 134. Hadrian, like Titus sixty-four years earlier, executed Jewish rebels in the city. By tradition, the condemned including Akiva, a leading Jewish sage and the rabbi who had greeted the rebel leader as the expected Messiah (Yer. Ta'anit, iv. 68d). By Hadrian's time Caesarea's outer harbor had deteriorated badly. The harbor had been wrecked by a tsunami in December 115. Tectonic activity had lowered the ocean floor and sunken parts of the breakwater were causing a hazard to shipping. Another earthquake struck in 132 when urban areas were again severely damaged. Much of the original city, including its celebrated harbor, had to be built anew, by Hadrian and his successor Antoninus Pius. At its height the rebuilt city covered an urban area of nearly a thousand acres - almost five-times the size of Jerusalem. -- Kenneth Humphreys
RP111120. Bronze AE 13, RPC III 3962; Kadman Caesarea 30 - 31; Rosenberger 28; Sofaer 33; BMC Palestine p. 21, 76 - 77; SNG ANS 773 - 775; De Saulcy 5, SNG Cop -, Fair/aF, weight 2.789 g, maximum diameter 12.6 mm, die axis 0o, Caesarea Maritima (Keisaria, Israel) mint, 11 Aug 117 - 10 Jul 138 A.D.; obverse IMP TRA HADRIANO CAE (or similar), laureate bust right; reverse lion walking right, snake right above, C I F A C (Colonia Prima Flavia Augusta Caesarea) below; scarce; $38.00 (38.38)


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Ascalon, Philistia, Judaea

|Judaea| |&| |Palestine|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.,| |Ascalon,| |Philistia,| |Judaea||AE| |19|
Askalon lies on the shore of the Mediterranean, ten miles north of Gaza and about 40 miles south of Joppa. Herod the Great ruled all of Palestine, except Askalon, which remained a free city. Today, a national park at Ashqelon, Israel includes ruins of Canaanite, Greek, Roman, Byzantine and Crusader walls and buildings.
JD111088. Bronze AE 19, RPC Online III 4002 (9 spec.); Sofaer 123; SNG ANS 714; De Saulcy 3; Rosenberger 151; Yashin 176; BMC Palestine -, F, toned, porous, a little off center, weight 6.283 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 0o, Askalon (Ashqelon, Israel) mint, 118 - 119 A.D.; obverse CEBACTOC (clockwise on right), laureate head right; reverse ACKA-ΛΩ, war-god Phanebal standing left, wearing helmet, harpa in raised right hand, small round shield on left arm, long palm frond in left hand, BKC (year 222) lower right; zero sales of this type listed on Coin Archives in the last two decades; rare; $180.00 (181.80)




  






OBVERSE LEGENDS

AVGVSTVSHADRIANVS
AVGVSTVSHADRIANVSPP
DIVVSHADRIANVSAVG
HADRIANVSAVGCOSIIIPP
HADRIANVSAVGVST
HADRIANVSAVGVSTVS
HADRIANVSAVGVSTVSPP
IMPCAEDITRAIANFDIVNERNEPTRAHADRIANOAVG
IMPCAEDIRAPARFDIVINERNEPTRAHADRIANOAVG
IMPCAESARTRAIAHADRIANVSAVG
IMPCAESARTRAIANHADRIANVSAVG
IMPCAESARTRAIANVSHADRIANVSAVG
IMPCAESARTRAIANVSHADRIANVSAVGPMTRPCOSIII
IMPCAESHADRIANDIVINERTRAIANOPTFIL
IMPCAESTRAHADRIANOAVGPP
IMPCAESTRAIANHADRIANOAVGDIVITRA
IMPCAESTRAIANHADRIANOAVGDIVITRAPARTHF
IMPCAESTRAIANHADRIANOPTAVGGERDAC
IMPCAESTRAIANHADRIANOOPTAVGGERDAC


REFERENCES

Abdy, R. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol. II - Part 3, From AD 117 - 138, Hadrian. (London, 2019).
Banti, A. & L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Blum, G. "Numismatique D'Antinoos" in JIAN 16. (Athens, 1914). pp. 33 - 70.
Calic, E. The Roman Avrei, Vol. I: From the Republic to Pertinax, 196 BC - 193 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappes sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 2: Nerva to Antoninus Pius. (Paris, 1883).
Delegido Moran, C. Aprovisionamiento, circulacin y uso de la moneda de plata en Hispania (siglos I-III d.C.): El Tesoro de Llria. (Valencia, 2014).
Hill, P. The Dating and Arrangement of the Undated Coins of Rome, A.D. 98-148. (London, 1970).
Mattingly H. & E. Sydenham. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol. II: Vespasian to Hadrian. (London, 1926).
Mattingly, H. & R. Carson. Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum, Vol. 3: Nerva to Hadrian. (London, 1936).
McAlee, R. The Coins of Roman Antioch. (Lancaster, PA, 2007).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet. II. Trajan to Commodus (London, 1971).
Seaby, H. & R. Loosley. Roman Silver Coins, Vol. II: Tiberius to Commodus. (London, 1979).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. II: The Accession of Nerva to the Overthrow of the Severan Dynasty AD 96 - AD 235. (London, 2002).
Strack, P. Untersuchungen zur rmischen Reichsprgung des zweiten Jahrhunderts, Teil II: Die Reichsprägung zur Zeit des Hadrian. (Stuttgart, 1933).
Toynbee, J. Roman medallions. ANSNS 5. (New York, 1944).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

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