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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |The Adoptive Emperors||View Options:  |  |  | 

Roman Coins of the Adoptive Emperors
Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

|Roman| |Egypt|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.,| |Roman| |Provincial| |Egypt||obol|NEW
In 127 A.D., Hadrian, acting on the advice of his proconsul of Asia, Gaius Minicius Fundanus, determined that Christians shall not be put to death without a trial.
RX92542. Bronze obol, RPC Online III 5681; Geissen 961; Dattari 1915; Milne 1236; BMC Alexandria p. 104, 894; SNG Cop 337; Kampmann 32.436; Emmett 1149/11 (R1), aVF, partial green patina, obverse edge beveled, porous, many tiny edge splits, weight 5.184 g, maximum diameter 20.5 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 126 - 28 Aug 127 A.D.; obverse AYT KAI TPAI A∆PIA CEB, laureate bust right, slight drapery on left shoulder; reverse two cornucopias, upright tops curving outward, overflowing with fruits, LIA (year 11) between; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $70.00 (64.40)


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

|Roman| |Egypt|, |Trajan,| |25| |January| |98| |-| |8| |or| |9| |August| |117| |A.D.,| |Roman| |Provincial| |Egypt||dichalkon|
The Hemhem crown, also known as the triple Atef crown, was symbol of Pharaonic power and authority credited with magical abilities that would protect Egypt from any enemy. It originated during the 18th dynasty was first seen in an image of the pharaoh Akhenaten in a tomb at Amarna. A Hemhem crown is worn Tutankhamen on the back of the gilded throne discovered in his tomb. No examples of this type of crown are known to have survived.
RX94981. Bronze dichalkon, Geissen 643; BMC Alexandria p. 68, 561; Milne 710; SNG Cop 265; SRCV II 3320; Kampmann 27.574; Emmett 707/7 (R5); Dattari -, VF, green patina, earthen deposits, bumps, marks, irregular flan shape. reverse edge beveled, weight 1.631 g, maximum diameter 13.2 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 113 - 28 Aug 114 A.D.; obverse no legend, laureate head right; reverse no legend, Hemhem crown, L I-Z (year 17) in lower field flanking ram horns; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $80.00 (73.60)


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

|Roman| |Egypt|, |Trajan,| |25| |January| |98| |-| |8| |or| |9| |August| |117| |A.D.,| |Roman| |Provincial| |Egypt||tetradrachm|
Ptolemy Soter integrated Egyptian religion with that of the Hellenic rulers by creating Serapis, a deity that would win the reverence of both groups. This was despite the curses of the Egyptian priests against the gods of previous foreign rulers (i.e Set who was lauded by the Hyksos). Alexander the Great had attempted to use Amun for this purpose, but Amum was more prominent in Upper Egypt, and not as popular in Lower Egypt, where the Greeks had stronger influence. The Greeks had little respect for animal-headed figures, and so an anthropomorphic statue was chosen as the idol, and proclaimed as the equivalent of the highly popular Apis. It was named Aser-hapi (i.e. Osiris-Apis), which became Serapis, and was said to be Osiris in full, rather than just his Ka (life force). Ptolemy's efforts were successful - in time Serapis was held by the Egyptians in the highest reverence above all other deities, and he was adored in Athens and other Greek cities.
RX92602. Billon tetradrachm, RPC Online III 4883; Geissen 223; Dattari 686; Milne 742; SNG Cop 269; BMC Alexandria p. 45, 370; Kampmann 27.627; Emmett 391/19 (R1), VF, well centered, porous/rough, corrosion, weight 10.969 g, maximum diameter 24.5 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 115 - 28 Aug 116 A.D.; obverse AYT TPAIAN API CEB ΓEPM ∆AKIK ΠAP, radiate bust right, star lower right; reverse bust of Serapis right, wearing taenia and kalathos, LI - Θ (year 19) across field; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $100.00 (92.00)


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

|Roman| |Egypt|, |Antoninus| |Pius,| |August| |138| |-| |7| |March| |161| |A.D.,| |Roman| |Provincial| |Egypt||drachm|
The Nilometer measured the height of the annual Nile flood. Sixteen cubits was considered the ideal height of the annual Nile flood. Less could mean drought or famine. Even in modern times, grand celebrations were held when the flood reached 16 cubits. In years when the flood failed to reach 16 cubits, the celebrations were canceled, and prayers and fasting were held instead. The peak flood occurred at the end of August, which explains why the Egyptian year began on 29 August.
RX95862. Bronze drachm, RPC Online IV.4 T15735 (3 spec.); Dattari-Savio pl. 138, 2705bis var. (draped); Emmett 1613/10 (R5); Geissen -; Milne -; BMC Alexandria -; SNG Cop -, aF, well centered, light corrosion, obverse edge beveled, weight 20.203 g, maximum diameter 33.5 mm, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 146 - 28 Aug 147; obverse AYT K T AIΛ A∆P ANTWNINOC CEB EYC, laureate head right; reverse L ∆E-KATOY (year 10), Nike standing right, nude to the waist, left foot on helmet, inscribing NI/KH on an oval shield set on her left knee and a column before her; extremely rare; $350.00 (322.00)


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

|Roman| |Egypt|, |Trajan,| |25| |January| |98| |-| |8| |or| |9| |August| |117| |A.D.,| |Roman| |Provincial| |Egypt||dichalkon|
In 112, one or the greatest Roman historians, Publius Cornelius Tacitus, was Governor of the Roman province of Asia (in Anatolia). The surviving portions of his two major works - the Annals and the Histories - examine the reigns of the Roman Emperors Tiberius, Claudius, Nero and those who reigned in the Year of the Four Emperors.
RX94987. Bronze dichalkon, RPC Online III 4774 (9 spec.); SNG BnF IV 1178, Dattari-Savio 7249, Kampmann 27.525, Emmett 726/16 (R5), Geissen -, SNG Cop -, aF, porous/grainy, edge a little ragged, obverse beveled, remnant of pre-strike casting sprue, weight 1.555 g, maximum diameter 13.3 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 112 - 28 Aug 113 A.D.; obverse laureate head right; reverse oinochoe (one-handled jug for pouring wine), L - Iς (year 16) flanking in lower fields; from the Ray Nouri Collection; rare; $45.00 (41.40)


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

|Roman| |Egypt|, |Trajan,| |25| |January| |98| |-| |8| |or| |9| |August| |117| |A.D.,| |Roman| |Provincial| |Egypt||dichalkon|
Isis was an Egyptian goddess, whose worship spread throughout the Greco-Roman world. She was worshiped as the ideal mother, wife, matron of nature and magic. She was the friend of slaves, sinners, artisans, the downtrodden, as well as listening to the prayers of the wealthy, maidens, aristocrats and rulers. Isis is the Goddess of motherhood and fertility.
RX95000. Bronze dichalkon, Dattari-Savio 1097, RPC Online III 4773, SNG Cop 259, Kampman 27.522, Emmett 710/- (year not listed), Geissen -, Milne -, BMC Alexandria -, VF, highlighting desert patina, off center on a tight flan, obverse edge beveled, weight 1.271 g, maximum diameter 13.1 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 112 - 28 Aug 113 A.D.; obverse no legend, laureate head right; reverse headdress of Isis (horns, uraeus, disk and plumes), L - Iς (year 16) in upper fields divided by feathers; from the Ray Nouri Collection; scarce; $50.00 (46.00)


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

|Roman| |Egypt|, |Trajan,| |25| |January| |98| |-| |8| |or| |9| |August| |117| |A.D.,| |Roman| |Provincial| |Egypt||dichalkon|
In 103, Legio X Gemina moved to Vienna, where it remained until the 5th century.
RX94976. Bronze dichalkon, Dattari-Savio 7196, RPC Online III 4770/8, Kampmann 27.524, Emmett 692/16 (R3), BMC Alexandria 2913 corr. (Hadrian), Geissen -, Milne -, SNG Cop -, gF, dark tone, earthen deposits, obverse edg beveled, remnants of pre-strike casting sprues, weight 1.291 g, maximum diameter 13.2 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 102 - 28 Aug 103 A.D.; obverse no legend, laureate head right; reverse no legend, kerykeion (caduceus) between two ears of grain, L - IS (year 16) divided low across field (off flan); from the Ray Nouri Collection; rare; $90.00 (82.80)


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

|Roman| |Egypt|, |Trajan,| |25| |January| |98| |-| |8| |or| |9| |August| |117| |A.D.,| |Roman| |Provincial| |Egypt||dichalkon|
Although this date arrangement is unpublished in the major references, Forum has had several examples.
RX92599. Bronze dichalkon, Milne 710 var.; Geissen 643 var.; BMC Alexandria p. 68, 561 var.; SNG Cop 265 var.; Kampmann 27.574 var.; Emmett 707/7 (R5); Dattari - (all L I-Z), VF, dark patina, earthen deposits, scratches, small edge split, obverse edge beveled, ragged flan (typical for the type), weight 1.886 g, maximum diameter 14.7 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 113 - 28 Aug 114 A.D.; obverse no legend, laureate head right; reverse no legend, Hemhem crown, L - IZ (year 17) in lower field flanking ram horns; from the Errett Bishop Collection; scarce variety; $60.00 (55.20)


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

|Roman| |Egypt|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.,| |Roman| |Provincial| |Egypt||diobol|
Ptolemy III built the largest and most magnificent temple in Alexandria, the Serapeum. Almost 400 years later, Hadrian rebuilt the temple. A life-size, black basalt statue of the Apis bull inscribed with a dedication of Hadrian was discovered in the underground vaults of the Serapeum. It is now in the Greco-Roman Museum in Alexandria. Perhaps it is that statue depicted on this coin.
RX92601. Bronze diobol, RPC Online III 5856 (9 spec.); Dattari 2007; BMC Alexandria p. , 809; Kampmann 32.560; Emmett 1114/17 (R1); Geissen 1067 var. (seen from behind), aF, porous, marks, scratches, edge splits, weight 7.747 g, maximum diameter 24.1 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 132 - 28 Aug 133 A.D.; obverse AVT KAIC TPAIAN - A∆PIANOC CEB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from the front; reverse Apis bull standing right on ground line, L IZ (year 17) above, altar(?) to right; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $50.00 (46.00)


Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 December 192 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

|Roman| |Egypt|, |Commodus,| |March| |or| |April| |177| |-| |31| |December| |192| |A.D.,| |Roman| |Provincial| |Egypt||tetradrachm|
Ptolemy Soter integrated Egyptian religion with that of the Hellenic rulers by creating Serapis, a deity that would win the reverence of both groups. This was despite the curses of the Egyptian priests against the gods of previous foreign rulers (i.e Set who was lauded by the Hyksos). Alexander the Great had attempted to use Amun for this purpose, but Amum was more prominent in Upper Egypt, and not as popular in Lower Egypt, where the Greeks had stronger influence. The Greeks had little respect for animal-headed figures, and so an anthropomorphic statue was chosen as the idol, and proclaimed as the equivalent of the highly popular Apis. It was named Aser-hapi (i.e. Osiris-Apis), which became Serapis, and was said to be Osiris in full, rather than just his Ka (life force). Ptolemy's efforts were successful - in time Serapis was held by the Egyptians in the highest reverence above all other deities, and he was adored in Athens and other Greek cities.
RX92519. Billon tetradrachm, Geissen 2212; Milne 2655; SNG Cop 571; RPC Online IV.4 T14197; Dattari 3847 var. (obv. leg.); BMC Alexandria p. 178, 1432 var. (same), VF, dark patina, centered, edge chip, area of corrosion damage, edge splits, weight 10.905 g, maximum diameter 24.9 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 183 - 28 Aug 184 A.D.; obverse M A KO ANTW CEB EYCEB, laureate head right; reverse on left: bust of Serapis right on short column, wearing kalathos; on right: Commodus standing left, wearing high round cap with tails and priestly robes, dropping incense on flaming altar (or thymiaterion), L in exergue, K − ∆ across fields (year 24 [of Marcus Aurelius]); from the Errett Bishop Collection; $60.00 (55.20)











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