Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  STORE WIDE SALE!!! 10% OFF EVERYTHING!!! WE ARE OPEN AND SHIPPING!!! We Are Working From Home, Social Distancing, Wearing Masks, And Sanitizing To Pack Orders!!! Please Call Us If You Have Questions 252-646-1958 Expert Authentication - Accurate Descriptions - Reasonable Prices - Coins From Under $10 To Museum Quality Rarities STORE WIDE SALE!!! 10% OFF EVERYTHING!!! WE ARE OPEN AND SHIPPING!!! We Are Working From Home, Social Distancing, Wearing Masks, And Sanitizing To Pack Orders!!! Please Call Us If You Have Questions 252-646-1958 Explore Our Website And Find Joy In The History, Numismatics, Art, Mythology, And Geography Of Coins!!!

× Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Recent Additions

Oct 31, 2020

Oct 30, 2020

Oct 29, 2020

Oct 28, 2020

Oct 27, 2020

Oct 26, 2020

Oct 25, 2020

Oct 23, 2020

Oct 22, 2020

Oct 21, 2020

Oct 20, 2020

Oct 19, 2020

Oct 18, 2020

Oct 17, 2020

Oct 16, 2020

Oct 15, 2020

Oct 14, 2020

Oct 13, 2020
Asian Coins

Oct 12, 2020

Oct 11, 2020
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |The Adoptive Emperors||View Options:  |  |  | 

Roman Coins of the Adoptive Emperors
Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D.

|Trajan|, |Trajan,| |25| |January| |98| |-| |8| |or| |9| |August| |117| |A.D.||dupondius|NEW
Dacia defeated! After his defeat in 101 A.D., King Decebalus complied with Rome for a time but then incited the tribes to pillage Roman colonies across the Danube. Trajan marched into Dacia in 105 A.D. After defeating the surrounding mountain fortresses, in 106 A.D. Trajan besieged Sarmizegetusa, the Dacian capital. With the aid of a Dacian traitor, the Romans found and destroyed water pipes supplying the city. Running out of water and food the city fell and was burned to the ground. Decebalus fled but, followed by the Roman cavalry, committed suicide rather than face capture. The Romans found Decebalus' treasure, estimated at 165,500 kg of gold and 331,000 kg of silver, in the river of Sargesia.
SH95273. Orichalcum dupondius, Woytek 327bD, BMCRE III 887, RIC II 563, Hunter II 312, BnF IV 322, Cohen II 533, Strack I 365, SRCV II -, aEF, dark brown patina, some porosity, weight 13.807 g, maximum diameter 27.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 103 - 111 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES NERVAE TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS V P P, radiate bust right, slight drapery on left shoulder; reverse S P Q R OPTIMO PRINCIPI, Dacian seated left on shields and arms in attitude of mourning, trophy of captured arms before her, S - C (senatus consulto) in exergue; $670.00 SALE |PRICE| $600.00


Marcus Aurelius, 7 March 161 - 17 March 180 A.D., Perga, Pamphylia

|Perga|, |Marcus| |Aurelius,| |7| |March| |161| |-| |17| |March| |180| |A.D.,| |Perga,| |Pamphylia||AE| |20|NEW
Perga was the capital of Pamphylia. Today it is a large site of ancient ruins, 15 kilometers (9.3 mi) east of Antalya on the southwestern Mediterranean coast of Turkey. During the Hellenistic period, Perga was one of the richest and most beautiful cities in the ancient world, famous for its temple of Artemis. It also is notable as the home of the renowned mathematician Apollonius of Perga.
RP96758. Bronze AE 20, RPC Online IV.3 T10660 (2 spec.), SNG Cop -, SNGvA -, BMC Pamphylia -, aVF, dark patina, centered, scratches, minor edge flaking, earthen deposits, weight 5.233 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 180o, Perga (near Antalya, Turkey) mint, 161 - 180 A.D; obverse ANTONIΩN-OC KAICAP AV, laureate bust left with slight drapery on far shoulder; reverse ΠEPΓ-AIΩN, Artemis standing slightly right, head right, wearing quiver over shoulder, holding arrow and bow; zero sales of this type recorded on Coin Archives for the last two decades; extremely rare; $90.00 SALE |PRICE| $81.00


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

|Hadrian|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.||denarius|NEW
Justitia is the Roman goddess or personification of justice. She was not depicted on many Roman coin types. Perhaps this coin would make a nice gift for a lawyer or judge!
RS94579. Silver denarius, RIC II-3 19 (R2); RSC II 875a; BMCRE III p. 238, 12; Hunter II 14; Strack II 5; SRCV II -, F, nice portrait, toned, tight flan, marks, tiny edge crack, weight 3.376 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 270o, Rome mint, 11 Aug - Dec 117 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES TRAIAN HADRIAN OPT AVG GER DAC, laureate bust right, bare chest (heroic bust), trace of drapery on far shoulder, balteus strap on right shoulder; reverse PARTHIC DIVI TRAIAN AVG F P M TR P COS P P, Justitia seated left on throne, patera in right hand, long scepter vertical in left hand, IVSTITIA in exergue; very rare; $120.00 SALE |PRICE| $108.00


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

|Hadrian|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.||dupondius|NEW
Annona was worshiped in Rome as the goddess who prospered the year's supply of grain. She was represented on an altar in the capital. The three principal granaries of Rome were Sicily, Egypt, and the African provinces. Annona civilis was the grain which purchased each year by the Roman state, then imported and put into storage, reserved and distributed for the subsistence of the people. Annona militaris was grain appropriated to the use of an army during a campaign.
RB95900. Orichalcum dupondius, RIC II-3 742; BMCRE III 1334A; Strack II 588; cf. SRCV II 3675 (similar but Annona right); Cohen II 176 (perhaps this coin); Hunter II -, aVF, well centered, rough corrosion, weight 10.531 g, maximum diameter 26.7 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 124 - 127 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, radiate bust right, chest bare, slight drapery on left shoulder; reverse COS III, Annona seated left, attendant stands before her helping to draw out a a cloth full of bread loaves(?), stern of ship in the background on right, S - C (Senatus Consulto) across field, ANNONA AVG in exergue; $80.00 SALE |PRICE| $72.00


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

|Hadrian|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.||sestertius|NEW
In 132, a messianic, charismatic Jewish leader Simon bar Kokhba started the Bar Kokhba revolt, a war of liberation for Judea against Rome. At first the rebellion was a success. The legion X Fretensis was forced to retreat from Jerusalem to Caesarea. The legion XXII Deiotariana, which advanced from Egypt, was destroyed. The Jews re-established their sacrifices and struck coins to celebrate their independence. The rebellion would last for only 30 months. By 135, the Romans had recaptured Jerusalem, Simon bar Kokhba was dead, and the majority of the Jewish population of Judea was either killed, exiled, or sold into slavery. Jerusalem was renamed Colonia Aelia Capitolina and an altar to Jupiter was erected on the site of the Temple. The Jews remained scattered without a homeland for close to two millennia.

RB95834. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC II-3 1291, BMCRE III 1400, Strack II 837, Hunter II 473, SRCV II 3596, Fair, pitting, weight 22.403 g, maximum diameter 33.5 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 129 - 130 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse FELICITATI AVG (above around edge), galley rowed left over waves, six oarsmen, steersman under an arched shelter at the stern, vexillum on prow, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking ship, COS III P P in exergue; ex Dan Clark (c. 1990); $90.00 SALE |PRICE| $81.00


Lucius Verus, 7 March 161 - February 169 A.D., Antioch, Syria

|Roman| |Syria|, |Lucius| |Verus,| |7| |March| |161| |-| |February| |169| |A.D.,| |Antioch,| |Syria||semis|NEW
In 162, Marcus Aurelius sent Lucius Verus to lead the war against Parthia. Lucius spent most of the campaign in Antioch, though he wintered at Laodicea and summered at Daphne, a resort just outside Antioch. Critics derided Lucius' luxurious lifestyle. He took up a mistress, enjoyed the company of actors and would "dice the whole night through." The Syrian army was said to spend more time in Antioch's open-air cafés than with their units. The war was, nevertheless, a success. Despite Lucius' minimal personal participation, he was awarded the titles Armeniacus, Medicus and Parthicus Maximus and a triumph upon his return to Rome in 166.
RY93576. Bronze semis, RPC Online IV.3 T7149, McAlee 610, VF, black patina, highlighting earthen deposits, obverse a little off center, weight 7.575 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 161 - 169 A.D.; obverse AVT K Λ AVPHΛ OVHPOC CEB, radiate head right; reverse S•C, uncertain Greek numeral-letter below, all within wreath; ex Roma Numismatics e-sale 47 (28 Jun 2018), lot 483; $110.00 SALE |PRICE| $99.00


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

|Roman| |Egypt|, |Trajan,| |25| |January| |98| |-| |8| |or| |9| |August| |117| |A.D.,| |Roman| |Provincial| |Egypt||dichalkon|NEW
In 112, one or the greatest Roman historians, Publius Cornelius Tacitus, was Governor of the Roman province of Asia (in Anatolia). The surviving portions of his two major works - the Annals and the Histories - examine the reigns of the Roman Emperors Tiberius, Claudius, Nero and those who reigned in the Year of the Four Emperors.
RX93583. Bronze dichalkon, RPC Online III 4774 (9 spec.); SNG BnF IV 1178, Dattari-Savio 7249, Kampmann 27.525, Emmett 726 (R5), Geissen -, Choice VF, nice dark near black patina with earthen highlighting, some porosity, ragged irregular edge, reverse edge beveled, weight 1.701 g, maximum diameter 14.0 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 112 - 28 Aug 113 A.D.; obverse laureate head right; reverse oinochoe (one-handled jug for pouring wine), L - Iς (year 16) flanking in lower fields; $125.00 SALE |PRICE| $107.00


Faustina Sr., Augusta 25 February 138 - Early 141, Wife of Antoninus Pius

|Faustina| |Sr.|, |Faustina| |Sr.,| |Augusta| |25| |February| |138| |-| |Early| |141,| |Wife| |of| |Antoninus| |Pius||denarius|NEW
Pietas in traditional Latin usage expressed a complex, highly valued Roman virtue; a man or woman with pietas respected his or her responsibilities to the gods, family, other people and entities (such as the state), and understood his or her place in society with respect to others.
RS96969. Silver denarius, RIC III AP394a, RSC II 234, BMCRE IV AP311, SRCV II 4598, Choice VF, well centered, superb matron portrait, old collection toning, flow lines, tiny edge cracks, weight 2.992 g, maximum diameter 17.5 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, posthumous, 145 A.D.; obverse DIVA AVG FAVSTINA, draped bust right, hair elaborately waived and banded, drawn up at the back and piled in a round coil at top; reverse PIETAS AVG (to the piety of the Emperor), Pietas standing slightly left, head left, veiled and draped, dropping incense from right hand on flaming garlanded column altar on left, incense box in left hand; ex Forum (2009); $140.00 SALE |PRICE| $126.00


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

|Hadrian|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.||denarius|
Spes was the Roman personification of Hope (the Greek equivalent was Elpis). According the Hesiod's famous story, Elpis was the last to escape the Pandora's box. It can be debated whether she was really about "hope" as we understand it, or rather mere "expectation." In art Spes is normally depicted carrying flowers or a cornucopia, but on coins she is almost invariably depicted holding a flower in her extended right, while the left is raising a fold of her dress. She was also named "ultima dea" - the last resort of men.
RS94590. Silver denarius, RIC II-3 2360, RSC II 1411, BMCRE III 733, Strack II 272, Hunter II 244, SRCV II 3542, Choice aVF/F, nice portrait, well centered, flow lines, reverse die wear, edge cracks, weight 2.944 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 137 - 138 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, bare head right; reverse SPES P R (Spes Populi Romani - the hope of the Roman people), Spes standing left, flower in right hand, raising skirt with left hand; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $120.00 SALE |PRICE| $108.00


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

|Hadrian|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.||denarius|
Salus was the Roman goddess of health. She was Hygieia to the Greeks, who believed her to be the daughter of Aesculapius, the god of medicine and healing, and Epione, the goddess of soothing of pain. Her father Asclepius learned the secrets of keeping death at bay after observing one snake bringing another snake healing herbs. Woman seeking fertility, the sick, and the injured slept in his temples in chambers where non-poisonous snakes were left to crawl on the floor and provide healing.
RS94583. Silver denarius, RIC II-3 198, RIC II 139, BMCRE III 320, RSC II 1353, Hunter II 118, Strack II 79, SRCV II 3539 var. (SAL AVG), F, light toning, a bit rough and porous, tiny edge crack, weight 3.316 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 119 - 120 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, laureate bust right, bare chest with drapery on far shoulder (heroic bust); reverse P M TR P COS III, Salus seated left, from patera in right hand, feeding snake rising from altar before her, resting left elbow on on back of chair, SALVS AVG (to the health of the Emperor) in exergue; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $110.00 SALE |PRICE| $99.00











Catalog current as of Saturday, October 31, 2020.
Page created in 1.656 seconds.
All coins are guaranteed for eternity