Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  10% Off Store-Wide Sale Until 2 October!!! All Items Purchased From Forum Ancient Coins Are Guaranteed Authentic For Eternity!!! Please Call Us If You Have Questions 252-646-1958 Expert Authentication - Accurate Descriptions - Reasonable Prices - Coins From Under $10 To Museum Quality Rarities 10% Off Store-Wide Sale Until 2 October!!! All Items Purchased From Forum Ancient Coins Are Guaranteed Authentic For Eternity!!! Internet Challenged? We Are Happy To Take Your Order Over The Phone 252-646-1958 Explore Our Website And Find Joy In The History, Numismatics, Art, Mythology, And Geography Of Coins!!!

× Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
New & Reduced

Sep 29, 2023

Sep 28, 2023
Themes & Provenance

Sep 27, 2023

Sep 26, 2023

Sep 25, 2023

Sep 24, 2023

Sep 22, 2023

Sep 21, 2023

Sep 19, 2023

Sep 18, 2023

Sep 17, 2023

Sep 14, 2023

Sep 13, 2023

Sep 12, 2023

Sep 11, 2023

Sep 10, 2023

Sep 09, 2023
Medieval & Modern Coins

Jul 09, 2023

Jul 02, 2023
Judean & Biblical Coins

Jun 21, 2023
Medieval & Modern Coins

Jun 15, 2023

May 04, 2023
Medieval & Modern Coins

May 03, 2023
Medieval & Modern Coins

May 02, 2023
Medieval & Modern Coins

May 01, 2023
Medieval & Modern Coins

Apr 23, 2023

Apr 22, 2023

Apr 12, 2023

Apr 07, 2023
Judean & Biblical Coins

Apr 06, 2023

Apr 01, 2023
Judean & Biblical Coins
Medieval & Modern Coins

Mar 28, 2023

Mar 27, 2023

Mar 26, 2023

Mar 25, 2023
Judean & Biblical Coins

Mar 24, 2023
Medieval & Modern Coins

Mar 22, 2023

Mar 21, 2023

Mar 18, 2023

Mar 17, 2023

Mar 16, 2023

Mar 14, 2023

Mar 13, 2023

Mar 09, 2023
Medieval & Modern Coins

Mar 08, 2023

Mar 07, 2023

Mar 03, 2023

Feb 27, 2023
Medieval & Modern Coins

Feb 21, 2023

Feb 20, 2023

Feb 19, 2023

Feb 18, 2023

Feb 17, 2023
Judean & Biblical Coins

Feb 16, 2023

Feb 08, 2023

Feb 05, 2023
Judean & Biblical Coins
Themes & Provenance

Feb 04, 2023

Feb 03, 2023

Jan 24, 2023
Medieval & Modern Coins

Jan 21, 2023

Jan 20, 2023

Jan 18, 2023

Dec 18, 2022

Nov 21, 2022

Nov 13, 2022
Judean & Biblical Coins

Nov 06, 2022

Oct 26, 2022

Oct 22, 2022
Judean & Biblical Coins

Oct 17, 2022

Oct 09, 2022
Medieval & Modern Coins

Oct 08, 2022

Sep 21, 2022
Judean & Biblical Coins

Sep 20, 2022

Aug 31, 2022
Judean & Biblical Coins

Aug 30, 2022
Judean & Biblical Coins

Aug 29, 2022
Judean & Biblical Coins

Aug 28, 2022
Judean & Biblical Coins

Aug 27, 2022
Judean & Biblical Coins

Aug 22, 2022
Medieval & Modern Coins

Aug 01, 2022
Books, Supplies & Services

Jul 19, 2022

Jul 12, 2022

Jul 10, 2022
Medieval & Modern Coins

Jul 08, 2022
Judean & Biblical Coins

Jul 05, 2022

Jun 30, 2022

Jun 24, 2022
Judean & Biblical Coins

Jun 23, 2022
Medieval & Modern Coins

Jun 16, 2022

Jun 13, 2022
Judean & Biblical Coins

Jun 11, 2022

Jun 09, 2022
Judean & Biblical Coins

Jun 04, 2022

Jun 02, 2022

Apr 22, 2022

Apr 13, 2022

Apr 11, 2022

Apr 10, 2022

Apr 09, 2022
Medieval & Modern Coins

Apr 07, 2022

Apr 06, 2022

Apr 04, 2022
Themes & Provenance

Apr 02, 2022

Mar 23, 2022
Judean & Biblical Coins

Mar 18, 2022
Judean & Biblical Coins

Mar 17, 2022
Judean & Biblical Coins

Mar 15, 2022

Mar 14, 2022
Judean & Biblical Coins

Mar 13, 2022

Mar 11, 2022

Mar 10, 2022

Mar 07, 2022
Medieval & Modern Coins

Mar 06, 2022
Judean & Biblical Coins

Mar 04, 2022

Mar 03, 2022

Feb 04, 2022
Medieval & Modern Coins

Feb 02, 2022
Medieval & Modern Coins

Jan 29, 2022

Jan 28, 2022

Oct 15, 2021

Oct 14, 2021

Oct 13, 2021
Judean & Biblical Coins

Oct 05, 2021

Sep 25, 2021

Jun 27, 2021

Feb 27, 2021

Feb 03, 2021

Nov 06, 2020
Books, Supplies & Services

Feb 13, 2020

May 18, 2018
Books, Supplies & Services

Medieval & Modern Coins
Books, Supplies & Services
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Syria||View Options:  |  |  | 

Ancient Coins of Syria
Seleukid Kingdom, Alexander I Balas, 152 - 145 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Alexander| |I| |Balas,| |152| |-| |145| |B.C.||AE| |15|
The aegis was a well-known symbol of Alexander the Great. After his death, the body of Alexander and his aegis wound up in the hands of the Ptolemies. At the time this coin was struck, Alexander Balas was the son in law of Ptolemy VI and the Ptolemaic candidate for the Seleucid throne. After the break between them, Ptolemy VI dissolved his daughter's first marriage and married her to Demetrius II, as if she were a piece of furniture. (J.P. Mahaffy). Alexander Balas fell at the 145 BC Battle of Oenoparas. Though the Battle was a Ptolemaic victory, Ptolemy VI died of battle wounds a few days later. Alexander Balas, of humble origin, claimed to be Antiochus IV's son and heir to the Seleukid throne. Rome and Egypt accepted his claims. He married Cleopatra Thea, daughter of King Ptolemy Philometor of Egypt. With his father-in-law's help, he defeated Demetrius Soter and became the Seleukid king. After he abandoned himself to debauchery, his father-in-law shifted his support to Demetrius II, the son of Demetrius Soter. Balas was defeated and fled to Nabataea where he was murdered. Apamea, on the right bank of the Orontes River, was an ancient Greek and Roman city. It was located at a strategic crossroads for Eastern commerce and became one of the four cities of the Syrian tetrapolis. Seleucus also made it a military base with 500 elephants, and an equestrian stud with 30,000 mares and 300 stallions.
GY112042. Bronze AE 15, Houghton-Lorber II 1792(2)b, Babelon 869, Houghton CSE 207 var. (A vice monogram), cf. SNG Spaer 1481 (control obscure), VF, porosity, obv. off center, edge cracks/splits, obv. edge beveled, weight 1.903 g, maximum diameter 14.8 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 150 - 146 B.C.; obverse aegis with gorgoneion (facing head of Medusa) at center; reverse Pegasos flying right right, AYB monogram (control) below, BAΣIΛEΩΣ (king) above, AΛEΞANΔPOY (Alexander) below; rare; $110.00 SALE PRICE $99.00


Antioch, Syria, 128 - 129 A.D.

|Antioch|, |Antioch,| |Syria,| |128| |-| |129| |A.D.||dichalkon|
In 129 A.D., Hadrian, on his voyages, inspected Caria, Cappadocia and Syria.
RP112085. Bronze dichalkon, RPC Online III 3750 (8 specimens); McAlee 127(a) (rare), SNG Cop 120; BMC Galatia p. 164, 111, aVF, dark green patina, highlighting earthen deposits, light marks, weight 3.542 g, maximum diameter 16.1 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 128 - 129 A.D.; obverse ANTIOXEWN THC MHTPOΠOΛEWC (clockwise from upper right), laureate and draped bust of Apollo, seen from the front; reverse ETOYC ZOP (year 177 Caesarean Era), lyre, A above; from the Michael Arslan Collection; rare; $70.00 SALE PRICE $63.00


Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D., Antioch, Syria

|Antioch|, |Domitian,| |13| |September| |81| |-| |18| |September| |96| |A.D.,| |Antioch,| |Syria||AE| |26|
The ruins of Antioch on the Orontes lie near the modern city of Antakya, Turkey. Founded near the end of the 4th century B.C. by Seleucus I Nicator, one of Alexander the Great's generals, Antioch's geographic, military and economic location, particularly the spice trade, the Silk Road, the Persian Royal Road, benefited its occupants, and eventually it rivaled Alexandria as the chief city of the Near East and as the main center of Hellenistic Judaism at the end of the Second Temple period. Antioch is called "the cradle of Christianity," for the pivotal early role it played in the emergence of the faith. It was one of the four cities of the Syrian tetrapolis. Its residents are known as Antiochenes. Once a great metropolis of half a million people, it declined to insignificance during the Middle Ages because of warfare, repeated earthquakes and a change in trade routes following the Mongol conquests, which then no longer passed through Antioch from the far east.6th Century Antioch
CM112118. Bronze AE 26, RPC II 2022g (2 spec.); McAlee 407g (ex rare); countermark: Howgego 245, gF, tight flan cutting off most of legend, marks, weight 11.872 g, maximum diameter 25.6 mm, die axis 0o, 7th officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 81 - 83 A.D.; obverse IMP DOMITIANVS CAES AVG, laureate head right; countermark: Athena standing right in 6x4mm rectangular punch, spear vertical behind in her right, left hand resting on grounded shield; reverse large S C (senatus consulto), Z (7th officina) below, within laurel wreath with eight bunches of leaves; from the Michael Arslan Collection; extremely rare; $120.00 SALE PRICE $108.00


Seleukid Kingdom, Alexander I Balas, 152 - 145 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Alexander| |I| |Balas,| |152| |-| |145| |B.C.||AE| |19|
Apamea is believed to be the Biblical city Shepham (Num. xxxiv. 11). It was fortified and enlarged by Seleucus I Nicator, who renamed it from Pharmake to Apamea, after his Bactrian wife, Apama. The Seleukids' elephant breeding and training camp was at Apamea. The pretender, Diodotus Tryphon, made Apameia the basis of his operations. At a strategic crossroad on the road to Cappadocia, Apamea was an important trade center in Roman Asia and flourished to the extent that its population eventually numbered half a million. The city boasted one of the largest theaters in the Roman world, and a monumental colonnade. The ruins of Apamea, with an enormous and highly ornamental acropolis, are about 55 km (34 mi) to the northwest of Hama, Syria.Great Colonnade at Apamea
GY112120. Bronze AE 19, Houghton-Lorber II 1805(2)e; SNG Spaer 1451 (where the Y is clear, ΔΓ is not listed refs.), F, well centered, green patina, earthen deposits, scratches, obv. edge beveled, central depressions, weight 6.309 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 0o, Syria, Apameia (Qalaat al-Madiq, Syria) mint, 150 - 145 B.C.; obverse head of Alexander the Great as Herakles right wearing Nemean lion scalp headdress; reverse Apollo standing left, examining arrow in right hand, resting left hand on bow grounded behind, palm frond outer left, AΛEΞANΔPOY (Alexander) downward on left, BAΣIΛEΩΣ (king) downward on right, ΔY (or ΔΓ?) monogram in exergue; from the Michael Arslan Collection, ex Tareq Hani Collection; $60.00 SALE PRICE $54.00


Tiberius, 19 August 14 - 16 March 37 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria

|Antioch|, |Tiberius,| |19| |August| |14| |-| |16| |March| |37| |A.D.,| |Antioch,| |Seleucis| |and| |Pieria,| |Syria||semis|
32 A.D. is a traditional date of the crucifixion of Jesus.
RY112382. Bronze semis, McAlee 218(c), RPC Online I 4273, Wruck 15b var. (dot above),, VF, porous, a little off center, weight 8.852 g, maximum diameter 21.8 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 31 - 32 A.D.; obverse TI CAESAR AVG TR POT XXXIII, laureate head right; reverse large SC, dot to left, linear inner border around, all within a laurel wreath, outer dot border; $110.00 SALE PRICE $99.00


Tiberius, 19 August 14 - 16 March 37 A.D., Roman Provincial Syria

|Antioch|, |Tiberius,| |19| |August| |14| |-| |16| |March| |37| |A.D.,| |Roman| |Provincial| |Syria||as|
The ruins of Antioch on the Orontes lie near the modern city of Antakya, Turkey. Founded near the end of the 4th century B.C. by Seleucus I Nicator, one of Alexander the Great's generals, Antioch's geographic, military and economic location, particularly the spice trade, the Silk Road, the Persian Royal Road, benefited its occupants, and eventually it rivaled Alexandria as the chief city of the Near East and as the main center of Hellenistic Judaism at the end of the Second Temple period. Antioch is called "the cradle of Christianity," for the pivotal early role it played in the emergence of the faith. It was one of the four cities of the Syrian tetrapolis. Its residents are known as Antiochenes. Once a great metropolis of half a million people, it declined to insignificance during the Middle Ages because of warfare, repeated earthquakes and a change in trade routes following the Mongol conquests, which then no longer passed through Antioch from the far east.
RY112246. Bronze as, McAlee 217(e)/2, RPC I 4272, VF, dark and earthen patina, weight 14.713 g, maximum diameter 28.1 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 31 - 32 A.D.; obverse TI CAESAR AVG TR POT XXXIII, laureate head right; reverse large SC, linear inner border around, all within a laurel wreath of six bunches of leaves; $120.00 SALE PRICE $108.00


Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria

|Antioch|, |Domitian,| |13| |September| |81| |-| |18| |September| |96| |A.D.,| |Antioch,| |Seleucis| |and| |Pieria,| |Syria||as|
The ruins of Antioch on the Orontes lie near the modern city of Antakya, Turkey. Founded near the end of the 4th century B.C. by Seleucus I Nicator, one of Alexander the Great's generals, Antioch's geographic, military and economic location, particularly the spice trade, the Silk Road, the Persian Royal Road, benefited its occupants, and eventually it rivaled Alexandria as the chief city of the Near East and as the main center of Hellenistic Judaism at the end of the Second Temple period. Antioch is called "the cradle of Christianity," for the pivotal early role it played in the emergence of the faith. It was one of the four cities of the Syrian tetrapolis. Its residents are known as Antiochenes. Once a great metropolis of half a million people, it declined to insignificance during the Middle Ages because of warfare, repeated earthquakes and a change in trade routes following the Mongol conquests, which then no longer passed through Antioch from the far east.6th Century Antioch
RP111928. Bronze as, McAlee 402(d) (rare); RPC II 2016; BMC Galatia p. 181, 246, VF, earthen deposits, obverse corrosion, weight 13.209 g, maximum diameter 27.8 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, as caesar, 69 - 79 A.D.; obverse DOMITIANVS CAESAR, laureate head left; reverse large S C, no dot in field, within laurel wreath with eight bunches of leaves; from the Michael Arslan Collection; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00


Nerva, 18 September 96 - 25 January 98 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria

|Roman| |Syria|, |Nerva,| |18| |September| |96| |-| |25| |January| |98| |A.D.,| |Antioch,| |Seleucis| |and| |Pieria,| |Syria||as|
The ruins of Antioch on the Orontes lie near the modern city of Antakya, Turkey. Founded near the end of the 4th century B.C. by Seleucus I Nicator, one of Alexander the Great's generals, Antioch's geographic, military and economic location, particularly the spice trade, the Silk Road, the Persian Royal Road, benefited its occupants, and eventually it rivaled Alexandria as the chief city of the Near East and as the main center of Hellenistic Judaism at the end of the Second Temple period. Antioch is called "the cradle of Christianity," for the pivotal early role it played in the emergence of the faith. It was one of the four cities of the Syrian tetrapolis. Its residents are known as Antiochenes. Once a great metropolis of half a million people, it declined to insignificance during the Middle Ages because of warfare, repeated earthquakes and a change in trade routes following the Mongol conquests, which then no longer passed through Antioch from the far east.6th Century Antioch
RY111785. Bronze as, McAlee 421(d); RPC Online III 3482; Butcher CRS 187; SNG Hunterian II 2907; BMC Galatia, p. 182, 261; Wruck 129, aVF, nice portrait green patina, some roughness, slightly off center, weight 12.763 g, maximum diameter 29.0 mm, die axis 0o, 4th officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, Jan - Sep 97 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR NERVA AVG III COS, laureate head right; reverse large S C, small Δ (4th officina) below, all within laurel wreath with eight bunches of leaves; ex CNG e-auction 510 (23 Feb 2022), lot 460; ex Dr. Jay M. Galst Collection; $100.00 SALE PRICE $90.00


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D., 138 - 161 A.D., Zeugma, Commagene, Syria

|Roman| |Syria|, |Antoninus| |Pius,| |August| |138| |-| |7| |March| |161| |A.D.,| |138| |-| |161| |A.D.,| |Zeugma,| |Commagene,| |Syria||AE| |22|
Zeugma was founded by Seleucus I Nicator who almost certainly named the city Seleucia after himself. In 64 B.C. the city was conquered by Rome and renamed Zeugma, meaning "bridge of boats." On the Silk Road connecting Antioch to China, Zeugma had a pontoon bridge across the Euphrates, which was the long time border with the Persian Empire. The Legio IV Scythica was camped in Zeugma. The legion and the trade station brought great wealth to Zeugma until, in 256, Zeugma was fully destroyed by the Sassanid king, Shapur I. An earthquake then buried the city beneath rubble. The city never regained its earlier prosperity and, after Arab raids in the 5th and 6th centuries, it was abandoned again.
RP111648. Bronze AE 22, cf. SNG Hunter II 2633; RPC Online IV.3 T10693; BMC Galatia p. 124, 1, VF, dark patina, tight flan, some legend unstruck/off flan, weight 9.144 g, maximum diameter 21.5 mm, die axis 0o, Zeugma (Belkis, Turkey) mint, obverse AYTO KANTI TI ANT AΔPIA ANTWNINOC CEB EYC (or similar, obscure), laureate head of Antoninus Pius right; reverse ZEVΓMATΕWN (or similar), temple with four columns; on far side of a wall of two stories and a colonnaded peribolos containing grove, A in right field, all in laurel wreath; $80.00 SALE PRICE $72.00


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus VII Euergetes Sidetes, 138 - 129 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Antiochus| |VII| |Euergetes| |Sidetes,| |138| |-| |129| |B.C.||AE| |12|
David Hendin identifies the mint city as Jerusalem. Some numismatists have attributed this type to Askalon. Houghton and Lorber attribute it to an uncertain mint in southern Koile-Syria.
GY111516. Bronze AE 12, Houghton-Lorber II 2122, SNG Spaer 2095, Houghton CSE 819, Hendin 6166 (Jerusalem mint), HGC 9 1111, VF, green patina, highlighting earthen deposits, rev. off center, weight 1.108 g, maximum diameter 11.8 mm, die axis 45o, southern Koile-Syria (?, uncertain) mint, 138 - 137 B.C.; obverse crested Boeotian helmet with cheek guards; reverse ANTIOXOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, aphlaston; this is the first specimen of this type handled by FORVM, ex Zuzim Inc. (Isadore Goldstein, Brooklyn, NY); $100.00 SALE PRICE $90.00










REFERENCES|

American Numismatic Society Collections Database - http://numismatics.org/search/search.
Bellinger, A. The Excavations at Dura-Europos, Final Report, Vol. 6: The Coins. (New Haven, 1949).
Bellinger, A. The Syrian Tetradrachms of Caracalla and Macrinus. ANSNS 3. (New York, 1940).
Burnett, A., M. Amandry, et al. Roman Provincial Coinage. (1992 - ).
Butcher, K. Coinage in Roman Syria: Northern Syria, 64 BC-AD 253. (London, 2004).
Cohen, E. Dated Coins of Antiquity: A comprehensive catalogue of the coins and how their numbers came about. (Lancaster, PA, 2011).
de Callata, F. "Le production des ttradrachmes civiques de la Cilicie jusqu? la Palestine" in Les Monnayages Syriens.
Gardner, P. Catalogue of Greek Coins in the British Museum, The Seleucid Kings of Syria. (Forni reprint, 1963).
Houghton, A., C. Lorber, & O. Hoover. Seleucid Coins: A Comprehensive Catalog. (Lancaster, 2002-2008).
Houghton, A. Coins of the Seleucid Empire from the Collection of Arthur Houghton. ACNAC 4. (New York, 1983).
Hoover, O. Handbook of Syrian Coins, Royal and Civic Issues, Fourth to First Centuries BC. HGC 9. (Lancaster, PA, 2009).
Lindgren, H. & F. Kovacs. Ancient Bronze Coins of Asia Minor and the Levant. (1985).
Lindgren, H. Lindgren III: Ancient Greek Bronze Coins from the Lindgren Collection. (1993).
McAlee, R. The Coins of Roman Antioch. (Lancaster, 2007).
McAlee, R. "Severan Tetradrachms of Laodicea" in ANSMN 29 (1984).
Mrkholm, O. "Autonomous Tetradrachms of Laodicea" in ANSMN 28 (New York, 1983).
Newell, E. Late Seleucid Mints in Ake-Ptolemais and Damascus. ANSNNM 84 (New York, 1939).
Newell, E. The Coinage of the Western Seleucid Mints, From Seleucus I to Antiochus III. (New York, 1941).
Newell, E. The Seleucid Mint of Antioch. (Chicago, 1978).
Price, M. The Coinage of in the Name of Alexander the Great and Philip Arrhidaeus. (London, 1991).
Prieur, M. & K. Prieur. The Syro-Phoenician Tetradrachms and their fractions from 57 BC to AD 258. (Lancaster, PA, 2000).
Roman Provincial Coinage Online - http://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Vol. 2, Asia and Africa. (London, 1979).
Sear, D. Greek Imperial Coins and Their Values. (London, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 7: Cyprus to India. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Mnchen Staatlische Mnzsammlung, Part 28: Syrien: Nicht-knigliche Prgungen. (Berlin, 2001).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain, Volume IV, Fitzwilliam Museum, Leake and General Collections, Part 8: Syria-Nabataea. (London, 1971).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain XII, The Hunterian Museum, University of Glasgow, Part 2: Roman Provincial Coins: Cyprus-Egypt. (Oxford, 2008).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Israel I, The Arnold Spaer Collection of Seleucid Coins. (London, 1998).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Switzerland I, Levante-Cilicia. (1986 & suppl.).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Schweiz II, Katalog der Sammlung Jean-Pierre Righetti im Bernischen Historischen Museum. (Bern, 1993).
Van Heesch, J. "The last civic coinages and the religious policy of Maximinus Daza (AD 312)" in NC 1993.
Waage, D. Antioch-on-the-Orontes, Vol. 4, Part 2: Greek, Roman, Byzantine and Crusaders' Coins. (Princeton, 1952).
Wroth, W. A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Galatia, Cappadocia, and Syria. (London, 1899).
Wruck, W. Die Syrische Provinzialprgung von Augustus bis Traian. (Stuttgart, 1931).

Catalog current as of Friday, September 29, 2023.
Page created in 4.376 seconds.
All coins are guaranteed for eternity