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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Greece| ▸ |Aetolia||View Options:  |  |  | 

Aetolia, Greece

Aetolia is a mountainous region of Greece on the north coast of the Gulf of Corinth. The Achelous River separates Aetolia from Acarnania to the west; on the north it had boundaries with Epirus and Thessaly; on the east with the Ozolian Locrians; and on the south the entrance to the Corinthian Gulf defined the limits of Aetolia. Other Greeks considered Aetolians semi-barbaric, warlike and predatory. They worshiped Athena, not as goddess of wisdom, but as a goddess of war, and worshiped Apollo and Artemis as "Laphrios gods," patrons of the spoils and loot of war. They also worshiped Hercules, the river Achelous and Bacchus. To oppose Macedon and the Achaean League, they united under the Aetolian League, an effective political and administrative structure with a powerful army. By the end of the 3rd century B.C., the Aetolian League controlled the whole of central Greece outside Attica. At its height, the league included Locris, Malis, Dolopes, part of Thessaly, Phocis, and Acarnania. Some Mediterranean city-states, such as Kydonia on Crete, joined. As the first Greek ally of the Roman Republic, the league helped defeat Philip V of Macedon. Roman meddling in Greek affairs shifted opinion and a few years later the league sided with Antiochus III, the anti-Roman Seleucid king. Antiochus' defeat in 189 B.C. forced the league to sign a treaty that allowed it to exist but made it an feeble pawn of the Roman Republic.

Aetolian League, Aetolia, Greece, c. 170 - 160 B.C.

|Aetolia|, |Aetolian| |League,| |Aetolia,| |Greece,| |c.| |170| |-| |160| |B.C.||triobol|
The Aetolian League was a confederation of tribal communities and cities centered in central Greece, probably established to oppose Macedon and the Achaean League. Other Greeks considered Aetolians to be semi-barbaric, but their league had an effective political and administrative structure and a powerful army. By the end of the 3rd century B.C., it controlled the whole of central Greece outside Attica. At its height, the league included Locris, Malis, Dolopes, part of Thessaly, Phocis, and Acarnania. Some Mediterranean city-states, such as Kydonia on Crete, joined. As the first Greek ally of the Roman Republic, the league helped defeat Philip V of Macedon. Roman meddling in Greek affairs shifted opinion and a few years later the league sided with Antiochus III, the anti-Roman Seleucid king. Antiochus' defeat in 189 B.C. forced the league to sign a treaty that allowed it to exist but made it an feeble pawn of the Roman Republic.
GS95934. Silver triobol, Tsangari 1243 (D109/R181), BCD Akarnania 491, HGC 4 952, BMC Thessaly p. 196, 24 var. (Πo monogram), SNG Cop III -, VF, well centered on a tight flan, uneven toning, scratches, weight 2.456 g, maximum diameter 16.1 mm, die axis 90o, Aitolian mint, c. 170 - 160 B.C.; obverse head of Aetolia right, wearing kausia; reverse the Calydonian boar standing right, AITΩΛΩN above, monogram in left field, ΠO below, spearhead right in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; scarce; SOLD


Aetolian League, Aetolia, Greece, c. 205 - 150 B.C.

|Aetolia|, |Aetolian| |League,| |Aetolia,| |Greece,| |c.| |205| |-| |150| |B.C.||triobol|
The Aetolian League was a confederation of tribal communities and cities centered in central Greece, probably established to oppose Macedon and the Achaean League. Other Greeks considered Aetolians to be semi-barbaric, but their league had an effective political and administrative structure and a powerful army. By the end of the 3rd century B.C., it controlled the whole of central Greece outside Attica. At its height, the league included Locris, Malis, Dolopes, part of Thessaly, Phocis, and Acarnania. Some Mediterranean city-states, such as Kydonia on Crete, joined. As the first Greek ally of the Roman Republic, the league helped defeat Philip V of Macedon. Roman meddling in Greek affairs shifted opinion and a few years later the league sided with Antiochus III, the anti-Roman Seleucid king. Antiochus' defeat in 189 B.C. forced the league to sign a treaty that allowed it to exist but made it an feeble pawn of the Roman Republic.
GS32219. Silver triobol, Tsangari 1153 (D56/R108), BCD Akarnania 477, HGC 4 952, aVF, toned, weight 2.326 g, maximum diameter 16.5 mm, die axis 135o, Aitolian mint, obverse head of Aetolia right, wearing kausia; reverse the Calydonian boar standing right, AITΩΛΩN above, YE monogram below, AP monogram and spearhead right in exergue; SOLD


Aetolian League, Aetolia, Greece, c. 205 - 150 B.C.

|Aetolia|, |Aetolian| |League,| |Aetolia,| |Greece,| |c.| |205| |-| |150| |B.C.||triobol|
The Aetolian League was a confederation of tribal communities and cities centered in central Greece, probably established to oppose Macedon and the Achaean League. Other Greeks considered Aetolians to be semi-barbaric, but their league had an effective political and administrative structure and a powerful army. By the end of the 3rd century B.C., it controlled the whole of central Greece outside Attica. At its height, the league included Locris, Malis, Dolopes, part of Thessaly, Phocis, and Acarnania. Some Mediterranean city-states, such as Kydonia on Crete, joined. As the first Greek ally of the Roman Republic, the league helped defeat Philip V of Macedon. Roman meddling in Greek affairs shifted opinion and a few years later the league sided with Antiochus III, the anti-Roman Seleucid king. Antiochus' defeat in 189 B.C. forced the league to sign a treaty that allowed it to exist but made it an feeble pawn of the Roman Republic.
SH53974. Silver triobol, Tsangari 1255 (D114/R193), BCD Akarnania 501, SNG Cop 15, HGC 4 952, VF, lightly toned, weight 2.464 g, maximum diameter 16.4 mm, die axis 270o, Aitolian mint, obverse head of Aetolia right, wearing kausia; reverse the Calydonian boar standing right, AITΩΛΩN above, ANP and ΩΣ monograms below, spearhead right in exergue; ex CNG e-auction 256 (25 May 2011), lot 87; SOLD










REFERENCES|

Babelon, E. Traité des Monnaies Grecques et Romaines. (Paris, 1901-1932).
Burnett, A., M. Amandry, et al. Roman Provincial Coinage. (London, 1992 - )
Forrer, L. Descriptive Catalogue of the Collection of Greek Coins formed by Sir Hermann Weber. (1922 - 1929).
Gardner, P. Catalogue of Greek Coins in the British Museum, Thessaly to Aetolia. (London, 1883).
Grose, S. Catalogue of the McClean Collection of Greek Coins, Fizwilliam Museum, Volume II - The Greek| mainland, the Aegaean| islands, Crete|. (Cambridge, 1926).
Hoover, O. Handbook of Coins of Northern and Central Greece: Achaia Phthiotis,...Aitolia, Lokris, Phokis, Boiotia, Euboia, Attica, Megaris, and Corinthia, Sixth to First Centuries BC. HGC 4. (Lancaster, PA/London, 2014).
Mildenberg, L. and S. Hurter, eds. The Dewing Collection of Greek Coins. ACNAC 6. (New York, 1985).
Münzen & Medaillen. Sammlung BC|D: Akarnanien und Aetolien, Auction 23. (18 October 2007, Stuttgart).
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Volume 1: Europe. (London, 1978).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 3: Greece: Thessaly to Aegean Islands. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, France, Bibliothèque National, Collection Jean et Marie Delepierre. (Paris, 1983).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Greece 6, The Alpha Bank Numismatic Collection, From Thessaly to Euboea. (Athens, 2011).
Tsangari, D. Corpus des monnaies d?or, d?argent et de bronze de la confédération étolienne. (Athens, 2007).

Catalog current as of Monday, May 17, 2021.
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