Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  STORE WIDE SALE!!! 10% OFF EVERYTHING!!! WE ARE OPEN AND SHIPPING!!! We Are Working From Home, Social Distancing, Wearing Masks, And Sanitizing To Pack Orders!!! Please Call Us If You Have Questions 252-646-1958 Expert Authentication - Accurate Descriptions - Reasonable Prices - Coins From Under $10 To Museum Quality Rarities STORE WIDE SALE!!! 10% OFF EVERYTHING!!! WE ARE OPEN AND SHIPPING!!! We Are Working From Home, Social Distancing, Wearing Masks, And Sanitizing To Pack Orders!!! Please Call Us If You Have Questions 252-646-1958 Explore Our Website And Find Joy In The History, Numismatics, Art, Mythology, And Geography Of Coins!!!

× Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Recent Additions

Aug 10, 2020

Aug 09, 2020

Aug 04, 2020

Aug 03, 2020

Aug 01, 2020

Jul 31, 2020

Jul 30, 2020

Jul 29, 2020

Jul 28, 2020

Jul 27, 2020

Jul 26, 2020

Jul 25, 2020

Jul 24, 2020

Jul 23, 2020
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Greece| ▸ |Epirus||View Options:  |  |  | 

Epiros, Greece

Epirus, in the western Balkans, was bordered by the Aetolian League to the south, Thessaly and Macedonia to the east, and Illyrian tribes to the north. Epirus had a far greater religious significance than might have been expected given its geographical remoteness, due to the shrine and oracle at Dodona - regarded as second only to the more famous oracle at Delphi. For a brief period, 280 - 275 B.C., the Epirote leader Pyrrhus managed to make Epirus the most powerful state in the Greek world, and his armies marched against Rome during an unsuccessful campaign in Italy. In 232 B.C. the tribes formed the Epirote League transforming the kingdom into a Republic. Over the next half century it was caught between the warring powers, Rome and Macedonia. In the Third Macedonian War, the Molossians split with the rest of Epirus and sided with the Macedonians. The outcome was disastrous; Molossia fell to Rome in 167 B.C., 150,000 of its inhabitants were enslaved and the region was so thoroughly plundered that it took 500 years to fully recover. Under Rome, the coastal regions of Epirus grew wealthy from trade routes, and construction of the Via Egnatia provided a further boost to prosperity.Epirus Map

Korkyra (Corfu), Island off Epirus, Greece, c. 433 - 360 B.C.

|Epirus|, |Korkyra| |(Corfu),| |Island| |off| |Epirus,| |Greece,| |c.| |433| |-| |360| |B.C.|, |stater|NEW
Corfu is a picturesque island near the coasts of Albania and Greece. The advantageous trade position allowed Corcyra to play an important role in Greek history. After the Byzantine Empire gradually collapsed it was ruled by Venice from 1401 to 1797, during which time the Turks laid several sieges against its impregnable Byzantine castle.
GS95931. Silver stater, Fried Group III; BMC Thessaly p. 118, 64; SNG Munchen 634; Dewing 1453; HGC 6 35 (R2); SNG Cop -; SNG Tubingen -, Choice VF, well centered and struck, attractive old collection toning, scratches, obverse die wear, weight 10.871 g, maximum diameter 21.2 mm, die axis 45o, Korkyra (Corfu) mint, c. 433 - 375/60 B.C.; obverse cow left, head turned back toward suckling calf standing right below; reverse vertical double stellate pattern, divided by double line, within square double linear frame, K right, all within a circular linear border; from the Errett Bishop Collection; rare; $800.00 SALE |PRICE| $720.00


Ambrakia, Epirus, Greece, Late 2nd Century B.C.

|Epirus|, |Ambrakia,| |Epirus,| |Greece,| |Late| |2nd| |Century| |B.C.|, |AE| |20|
During the struggle of the Aetolians against Rome, Ambracia stood a stubborn siege, including the first known use of poison gas against the Romans' siege tunnels. Ambracia was captured and plundered by Marcus Fulvius Nobilior in 189 B.C., after which it was declared by Rome a "free city" and gradually fell into insignificance. The foundation by Augustus of Nicopolis, into which the remaining inhabitants were drafted, left the site desolate. In Byzantine times a new settlement took its place under the name of Arta. Some fragmentary walls of large, well-dressed blocks near this latter town indicate the early prosperity of Ambracia.
GB79836. Bronze AE 20, SNG Cop 30; BMC Thessaly p. 95, 16, VF, weight 7.058 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, die axis 180o, Ambrakia (Arta, Greece) mint, late 2nd century B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse Apollo Aktios seated left on a throne, bow in right hand, A-M/B-P across field; very rare; $80.00 SALE |PRICE| $72.00


Epirote Republic, Epirus, Greece, 238 - 168 B.C.

|Epirus|, |Epirote| |Republic,| |Epirus,| |Greece,| |238| |-| |168| |B.C.|, |victoriatus|
In 232 B.C. the tribes of Epiros formed the Epirote League transforming the kingdom into a Republic. Over the next half century it was caught between the warring powers, Rome and Macedonia. In the Third Macedonian War, the Molossians split with the rest of Epirus and sided with the Macedonians. The outcome was disastrous; Molossia fell to Rome in 167 B.C., 150,000 of its inhabitants were enslaved, and the region was so thoroughly plundered that it took 500 years to fully recover.
SH30351. Silver victoriatus, BMC Thessaly p. 90, 42; SNG Cop 126, gVF, weight 3.203 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 180o, Phoenice mint, 238 - 168 B.C.; obverse jugate heads of Dodonaean Zeus and Dione, monograms behind; reverse thunderbolt, AΠEI/PΩTAN above and below in two lines, all within oak wreath; ex Tom Cederlind; rare; SOLD










REFERENCES|

Babelon, E. Trait des Monnaies Grecques et Romaines. (Paris, 1901-1932).
Burnett, A., M. Amandry, et al. Roman Provincial Coinage. (London, 1992 - )
Calciati, R. Pegasi II. (Mortara, 1990).
Forrer, L. Descriptive Catalogue of the Collection of Greek Coins formed by Sir Hermann Weber. (1922 - 1929).
Franke, P. Die antiken Mnzen von Epirus. (Wiesbaden, 1961).
Gardner, P.A Catalogue of Greek Coins in the British Museum, Thessaly to Aetolia. (London, 1883).
Grose, S. W. Catalogue of the McClean Collection of Greek Coins, Fizwilliam Museum, Volume II - The Greek| mainland, the Aegaean| islands, Crete|. (Cambridge, 1926).
Head, B. Catalogue of Greek Coins in the British Museum, Corinth, Colonies of Corinth, Etc. (London, 1889).
Hoover, O. Handbook of Coins of the Islands: Adriatic, Ionian, Thracian, Aegean, and Carpathian Seas (Excluding Crete and Cyprus), Sixth to First Centuries BC. (Lancaster, 2010).
Mildenberg, L. & S. Hurter, eds. The Dewing Collection of Greek Coins. ACNAC 6. (New York, 1985).
Numismatik Lanz. Mnzen von Korinth: Sammlung BC|D, Auction 105. (Munich, 26 November 2001).
Ravel, O. Les "Poulains" de Corinthe, I - II. (Basel, 1936; London, 1948).
Schlosser, J. von. Beschreibung der Altgreichischen Mnzen I: Thessalien, Illyrien, Dalmatien und die Inseln des Adriatischen Meeres, Epeiros. (Vienna, 1893).
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Volume 1: Europe. (London, 1978).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 3: Greece: Thessaly to Aegean Islands. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Mnchen Staatlische Mnzsammlung, Part 12: Thessalien-Illyrien-Epirus-Korkyra. (Berlin, 2007).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, France, Bibliothque National, Collection Jean et Marie Delepierre. (Paris, 1983).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Greece 1, Collection Rna H. Evelpidis, Part 2: Macdoine - Thessalie - Illyrie - Epire - Corcyre. (Athens, 1975).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Greece 6, The Alpha Bank Numismatic Collection, From Thessaly to Euboea. (Athens, 2011).

Catalog current as of Wednesday, August 12, 2020.
Page created in 0.813 seconds.
All coins are guaranteed for eternity