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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |Roman Provincial| ▸ |Roman Judea & Palestina||View Options:  |  |  |   

Roman Provincial Coins of Judea and Palestina
Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D., Ascalon, Philistia, Judaea

|Roman| |Judea| |&| |Palestina|, |Antoninus| |Pius,| |August| |138| |-| |7| |March| |161| |A.D.,| |Ascalon,| |Philistia,| |Judaea||AE| |22|NEW
The Philistines conquered Canaanite Ashkelon about 1150 B.C. and it became one of the five Philistine cities that were constantly warring with the Israelites and the Kingdom of Judah. The last of the Philistine cities to hold out against Nebuchadnezzar, it finally fell in 604 B.C.; burned and destroyed, its people exiled, the Philistine era ended. Ashkelon was rebuilt, dominated by Persian culture. After the Alexander's conquest, Ashkelon was an important Hellenistic seaport. The Jews drove the Greeks out of the region during the Maccabean Revolt, which lasted from 167 to 160 B.C. In 63 B.C. the area was incorporated into the Roman Republic. Cleopatra VII used Ashkelon as her refuge when her brother and sister exiled her in 49 B.C. The city remained loyal to Rome during the First Jewish Revolt.
RY110574. Bronze AE 22, cf. Yashin 200 - 202; RPC IV.3 T10145/2 (2 spec., one with this bust); Rosenberger I 169; BMC Palestine -, Sofaer -, aF, well centered, red-brown patina, weight 11.076 g, maximum diameter 21.8 mm, die axis 0o, Askalon (Ashqelon, Israel) mint, 141 - 142 A.D.; obverse CEBA(?), laureate draped, and cuirassed bust right, short beard; reverse ACKAΛW, Tyche-Astarte standing slightly left on galley, turreted head left, standard in right hand, apluster in left hand, incense altar over E left, dove standing left over EMC (year 245) on right; Coin Archives records only one specimen of the type at auction in the last two decades; extremely rare; $180.00 SALE PRICE $162.00


Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D., Ascalon, Philistia, Judaea

|Roman| |Judea| |&| |Palestina|, |Domitian,| |13| |September| |81| |-| |18| |September| |96| |A.D.,| |Ascalon,| |Philistia,| |Judaea||AE| |18|NEW
The Philistines conquered Canaanite Ashkelon about 1150 B.C. and it became one of the five Philistine cities that were constantly warring with the Israelites and the Kingdom of Judah. The last of the Philistine cities to hold out against Nebuchadnezzar, it finally fell in 604 B.C.; burned and destroyed, its people exiled, the Philistine era ended. Ashkelon was rebuilt, dominated by Persian culture. After the Alexander's conquest, Ashkelon was an important Hellenistic seaport. The Jews drove the Greeks out of the region during the Maccabean Revolt, which lasted from 167 to 160 B.C. In 63 B.C. the area was incorporated into the Roman Republic. Cleopatra VII used Ashkelon as her refuge when her brother and sister exiled her in 49 B.C. The city remained loyal to Rome during the First Jewish Revolt.
RP110556. Bronze AE 18, RPC Online II 2213; Sofaer 82; Rosenberger 116; BMC Palestine p. 122, 129; SNG ANS -, aVF, bare toned metal, reverse a little off center, weight 5.763 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, Askalon (Ashqelon, Israel) mint, 85 - 86 A.D.; obverse laureate head left, CE (caesar) downward on left; reverse Phanebal (war god of Ascalon) standing facing, wearing military dress, raising sword above head in right hand, shield and palm frond in left hand, ΘΠP (year 189 of the Ascalon Era) downward on left, AC (Ascalon) upward on right; rare; $100.00 SALE PRICE $90.00


Herod Archelaus, Ethnarch of Samaria, Judea, and Idumea, 4 B.C. - 6 A.D.

|Herod| |Archelaus|, |Herod| |Archelaus,| |Ethnarch| |of| |Samaria,| |Judea,| |and| |Idumea,| |4| |B.C.| |-| |6| |A.D.||prutah|NEW
The galley refers to Archelaus' voyage to Rome at the beginning of his reign. His father had modified his will, naming Archelaus' younger brother, Antipas, king. Archelaus appealed to Rome and was awarded a large share of the kingdom and the title ethnarch. The galley reminded those that thought to challenge him that he had the backing of Rome. -- Ancient Jewish Coinage by Ya'akov Meshore
JD110336. Bronze prutah, Hendin 6228; Meshorer TJC 72; Meshorer AJC 5; SNG ANS 243; RPC Online I 4916; BMC Palestine p. 233, 27, Choice VF, well centered, green patina, highlighting earthen deposits, sprue cuts, obverse edge beveled, weight 1.277 g, maximum diameter 14.2 mm, die axis 0o, Jerusalem mint, 4 B.C. - 6 A.D.; obverse H P W (counterclockwise from below), prow of galley left; reverse EΘN (Ethnarch), surrounded by wreath; from an Israeli collection; $120.00 SALE PRICE $96.00


Judaea, Porcius Festus, Roman Procurator under Nero, 59 - 62 A.D.

|Porcius| |Festus|, |Judaea,| |Porcius| |Festus,| |Roman| |Procurator| |under| |Nero,| |59| |-| |62| |A.D.||prutah|NEW
"Now when Festus had come into his province, after three days he went up to Jerusalem from Caesarea. And the chief priests and the principal men of the Jews informed him against Paul; and they urged him, asking as a favor to have the man sent to Jerusalem, planning an ambush to kill him on the way. Festus replied that Paul was being kept at Caesarea, and that he himself intended to go there shortly...But Festus, wishing to do the Jews a favor, said to Paul, "Do you wish to go up to Jerusalem, and there be tried on these charges before me?" But Paul said, "I am standing before Caesar's tribunal, where I ought to be tried; to the Jews I have done no wrong, as you know very well. If then I am a wrongdoer, and have committed anything for which I deserve to die, I do not seek to escape death; but if there is nothing in their charges against me, no one can give me up to them. I appeal to Caesar." Then Festus, when he had conferred with his council, answered, "You have appealed to Caesar; to Caesar you shall go." - Acts 25:1-4,9-12
JD110337. Bronze prutah, Hendin 6380; Meshorer TJC 345; RPC I 4972; Sofaer, pl. 220, 66; BMC Palestine p. 266, 1, VF, dark patina, highlighting earthen deposits, rev. off center, obv. edge beveled, small flan split, weight 2.253 g, maximum diameter 17.3 mm, die axis 0o, Jerusalem mint, 59 A.D.; obverse NEP/WNO/C (Nero) in wreath tied at the bottom with an X; reverse KAICAPO (Caesar) and date LE (year 5), palm frond; from an Israeli collection; $110.00 SALE PRICE $88.00


Judaea, Porcius Festus, Roman Procurator under Nero, 59 - 62 A.D.

|Porcius| |Festus|, |Judaea,| |Porcius| |Festus,| |Roman| |Procurator| |under| |Nero,| |59| |-| |62| |A.D.||prutah|NEW
"Now when Festus had come into his province, after three days he went up to Jerusalem from Caesarea. And the chief priests and the principal men of the Jews informed him against Paul; and they urged him, asking as a favor to have the man sent to Jerusalem, planning an ambush to kill him on the way. Festus replied that Paul was being kept at Caesarea, and that he himself intended to go there shortly...But Festus, wishing to do the Jews a favor, said to Paul, "Do you wish to go up to Jerusalem, and there be tried on these charges before me?" But Paul said, "I am standing before Caesar's tribunal, where I ought to be tried; to the Jews I have done no wrong, as you know very well. If then I am a wrongdoer, and have committed anything for which I deserve to die, I do not seek to escape death; but if there is nothing in their charges against me, no one can give me up to them. I appeal to Caesar." Then Festus, when he had conferred with his council, answered, "You have appealed to Caesar; to Caesar you shall go." - Acts 25:1-4,9-12
JD110338. Bronze prutah, Hendin 6380; Meshorer TJC 345; RPC I 4972; Sofaer, pl. 220, 66; BMC Palestine p. 266, 1, VF, dark patina, highlighting earthen deposits, well centered, weight 1.986 g, maximum diameter 17.4 mm, die axis 0o, Jerusalem mint, 59 A.D.; obverse NEP/WNO/C (Nero) in wreath tied at the bottom with an X; reverse KAICAPO (Caesar) and date LE (year 5), palm frond; from an Israeli collection; $110.00 SALE PRICE $99.00


Judean Kingdom, Herod the Great, 37 - 4 B.C.

|Herod| |the| |Great|, |Judean| |Kingdom,| |Herod| |the| |Great,| |37| |-| |4| |B.C.||prutah|NEW
Herod's most famous and ambitious project was his magnificent expansion of the Second Temple in Jerusalem in 20 - 19 B.C. Although work on out-buildings continued another eighty years, the new Temple was finished in a year and a half. To comply with religious law, Herod employed 1,000 priests as masons and carpenters. The temple was destroyed in 70 A.D. Today, only the four retaining walls of the Temple Mount remain standing, including the Western Wall.
JD110309. Bronze prutah, Meshorer TJC 59a; SNG ANS 216; BMC Palestine p. 224, 40; HGC 10 660; Hendin 6219a var. (HPW BACI); Sofaer 30 var. (same), VF, very broad flan, green patina, sprue remnants, tiny edge cracks, weight 1.592 g, maximum diameter 15.5 mm, die axis 90o, Jerusalem mint, c. 21 - 12 B.C.; obverse HPΩ∆ BACI (Greek abbreviation: of King Herod), anchor; reverse double cornucopia, caduceus between horns, five pellets above; from an Israeli collection; $160.00 SALE PRICE $128.00


Judean Kingdom, Herod the Great, 37 - 4 B.C.

|Herod| |the| |Great|, |Judean| |Kingdom,| |Herod| |the| |Great,| |37| |-| |4| |B.C.||prutah|NEW
Herod's most famous and ambitious project was his magnificent expansion of the Second Temple in Jerusalem in 20 - 19 B.C. Although work on out-buildings continued another eighty years, the new Temple was finished in a year and a half. To comply with religious law, Herod employed 1,000 priests as masons and carpenters. The temple was destroyed in 70 A.D. Today, only the four retaining walls of the Temple Mount remain standing, including the Western Wall.
JD110311. Bronze prutah, Hendin 6219a; Meshorer TJC 59c; Sofaer 30; SNG ANS 206; BMC Palestine p. 224, 44; HGC 10 662, aVF, dark green patina, highlighting earthen deposits, obv. off center, obv. edge beveled, sprue cuts on edge, weight 1.418 g, maximum diameter 14.4 mm, die axis 150o, Jerusalem mint, 21 - 12 B.C.; obverse HPW BACI (Greek abbreviation: of King Herod), anchor; reverse double cornucopia, caduceus between horns, pellets above; from an Israeli collection; $110.00 SALE PRICE $88.00


Judean Kingdom, Herod the Great, 37 - 4 B.C.

|Herod| |the| |Great|, |Judean| |Kingdom,| |Herod| |the| |Great,| |37| |-| |4| |B.C.||prutah|NEW
Herod's most famous and ambitious project was his magnificent expansion of the Second Temple in Jerusalem in 20 - 19 B.C. Although work on out-buildings continued another eighty years, the new Temple was finished in a year and a half. To comply with religious law, Herod employed 1,000 priests as masons and carpenters. The temple was destroyed in 70 A.D. Today, only the four retaining walls of the Temple Mount remain standing, including the Western Wall.
JD110307. Bronze prutah, Meshorer TJC 59a; SNG ANS 216; BMC Palestine p. 224, 40; HGC 10 660; Hendin 6219a var. (HPW BACI); Sofaer 30 var. (same), Choice VF, excellent centering and strike on a broad flan, green patina, earthen deposits, porosity, reverse edge beveled, weight 1.585 g, maximum diameter 15.7 mm, die axis 0o, Jerusalem mint, c. 21 - 12 B.C.; obverse HPω∆ BACI (Greek abbreviation: of King Herod), anchor; reverse double cornucopia, caduceus between horns, five pellets above; $300.00 SALE PRICE $240.00


Herod Archelaus, Ethnarch of Samaria, Judea, and Idumea, 4 B.C. - 6 A.D.

|Herod| |Archelaus|, |Herod| |Archelaus,| |Ethnarch| |of| |Samaria,| |Judea,| |and| |Idumea,| |4| |B.C.| |-| |6| |A.D.||prutah|
Grapes, the vine and wine were an important part of the ancient economy and ritual. Grapes were brought to the Temple as offerings of the first-fruits and wine was offered upon the altar. The vine and grapes decorated the sacred vessels in the sanctuary and a golden vine with clusters of grapes stood at its entrance.
JD110303. Bronze prutah, Hendin 6227; Meshorer TJC 73; BMC Palestine p. 232, 10; SGICV 5539; RPC I 4917, aVF, green patina, earthen deposits, squared flan, obv. double struck, rev. off center, weight 3.126 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 45o, Jerusalem mint, 4 B.C. - 6 A.D.; obverse HPω∆OY (Greek: of Herod), bunch of grapes, leaf on left; reverse EΘNOPXOY (Greek: Ethnarch), tall helmet with crest and neck straps viewed from the front, small caduceus in lower left field; from an Israeli collection; $90.00 SALE PRICE $72.00


Herod Archelaus, Ethnarch of Samaria, Judea, and Idumea, 4 B.C. - 6 A.D.

|Herod| |Archelaus|, |Herod| |Archelaus,| |Ethnarch| |of| |Samaria,| |Judea,| |and| |Idumea,| |4| |B.C.| |-| |6| |A.D.||prutah|
Grapes, the vine and wine were an important part of the ancient economy and ritual. Grapes were brought to the Temple as offerings of the first-fruits and wine was offered upon the altar. The vine and grapes decorated the sacred vessels in the sanctuary and a golden vine with clusters of grapes stood at its entrance.
JD110304. Bronze prutah, Hendin 6227; Meshorer TJC 73; BMC Palestine p. 232, 10; SGICV 5539; RPC I 4917, F, ragged rectangular flan, earthen encrustation, porosity, weight 1.876 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 150o, Jerusalem mint, 4 B.C. - 6 A.D.; obverse HPω∆OY (Greek: of Herod), bunch of grapes, leaf on left; reverse EΘNOPXOY (Greek: Ethnarch), tall helmet with crest and neck straps viewed from the front, small caduceus in lower left field; from an Israeli collection; $60.00 SALE PRICE $48.00




  






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