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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |Roman Provincial| ▸ |Roman Judea & Palestina||View Options:  |  |  |   

Roman Provincial Coins of Judea and Palestina
Herod Archelaus, Ethnarch of Samaria, Judea, and Idumea, 4 B.C. - 6 A.D.

|Herod| |Archelaus|, |Herod| |Archelaus,| |Ethnarch| |of| |Samaria,| |Judea,| |and| |Idumea,| |4| |B.C.| |-| |6| |A.D.||prutah|NEW
The galley refers to Archelaus' voyage to Rome at the beginning of his reign. His father had modified his will, naming Archelaus' younger brother, Antipas, king. Archelaus appealed to Rome and was awarded a large share of the kingdom and the title ethnarch. The galley reminded those that thought to challenge him that he had the backing of Rome. -- Ancient Jewish Coinage by Ya'akov Meshore
JD111612. Bronze prutah, Hendin 6228; Meshorer TJC 72; Meshorer AJC 5; SNG ANS 243; RPC Online I 4916; BMC Palestine p. 233, 27, Choice aEF/EF, well centered, bold strike, dark green patina, highlighting earthen deposits, edges ragged where flan casting sprues were snapped off, weight 0.964 g, maximum diameter 14.0 mm, die axis 135o, Jerusalem mint, 4 B.C. - 6 A.D.; obverse H P W (counterclockwise from below), prow of galley left; reverse EΘN (Ethnarch), surrounded by wreath; from the collection of a Texas clergyman, ex Zuzim Inc. (Isadore Goldstein, Brooklyn, NY); $150.00 (151.50)


Judaea, Valerius Gratus, Roman Prefect Under Tiberius, 15 - 26 A.D., Cohors II Italica Civium Romanorum Countermark

|Valerius| |Gratus|, |Judaea,| |Valerius| |Gratus,| |Roman| |Prefect| |Under| |Tiberius,| |15| |-| |26| |A.D.,| |Cohors| |II| |Italica| |Civium| |Romanorum| |Countermark||prutah|NEW
Now there was a certain man at Caesarea named Cornelius, a centurion of what was called the Italian cohort...(Acts 10:1).

Spijkermann was the first to publish a countermarked prutah, also a Valerius Gratus coin, in 1963. Lnnqvist published the first detailed study, "New Vistas on the Countermarked Coins of the Roman Prefects of Judaea" in INJ 12. Kogon published an update, "Countermarks on Small Judean Coins" in INR 7, identifying 47 known specimens of countermarked prutah of all types. Both papers are available online. Lnnqvist interpreted CΠ in the countermark as an abbreviation for the Greek word σπειρα, referring to a Roman legionary tactical unit, a cohors. The use of CΠ referring to a cohors is also known from an inscription. He suggested that the countermarks were applied in 36 - 37 A.D. in Jerusalem to mark the coins as pay for the soldiers of the cohors II Italica civium Romanorum.
JD111613. Bronze prutah, Hendin 6369a (same c/m); RPC I 4966.8-11 (same); Meshorer TJC 330 (same); countermark: Kogon 3b, Howgego GIC 386, coin: Fair, countermark: VF, weight 2.195 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 0o, Jerusalem mint, 24 - 25 A.D., c/m: 36 - 37/41 A.D.; obverse TIB / KAI/CAP (Greek: Tiberius Caesar) in three lines within wreath tied at base with an X; reverse palm branch curving right, flanked by IOY-ΛIA (Greek: Julia = Tiberius' mother Livia) above L - IA (year 11 of Tiberius) in two lines across field; countermark: palm frond flanked by C-Π within 8mm circular punch; from the collection of a Texas clergyman, ex J. P. Fontanille Collection (2016); rare countermark; $1600.00 (1616.00)


Judaea, Antonius Felix, Roman Procurator Under Claudius and Nero, 52 - 60 A.D.

|Antonius| |Felix|, |Judaea,| |Antonius| |Felix,| |Roman| |Procurator| |Under| |Claudius| |and| |Nero,| |52| |-| |60| |A.D.||prutah|NEW
Minted by Antonius Felix, Roman Procurator of Judaea, 52 - 60 A.D., in the names of Nero and Britannicus Caesars, the stepson and son respectively of the emperor Claudius.
JD111614. Bronze prutah, Hendin 6377; Meshorer TJC 340; Sofaer 59; BMC Palestine p. 264, 21; RPC I 4971, aVF, well centered, tight flan, obv. edge beveled, weight 2.045 g, maximum diameter 17.3 mm, die axis 0o, Jerusalem mint, under Nero, 54 A.D.; obverse NEPW KΛAV KAICAP (Nero Claudius Caesar), two crossed oblong shields with two crossed spears on far side; reverse BPIT (Britannicus), six-branched palm bearing two bunches of dates, L - I∆ / K-AI (year 14 of Caesar) in two divided lines flanking trunk; from the collection of a Texas clergyman, ex Amphora Coins (David Hendin); $100.00 (101.00)


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D., Caesarea Maritima, Judaea

|Judaea| |&| |Palestine|, |Nero,| |13| |October| |54| |-| |9| |June| |68| |A.D.,| |Caesarea| |Maritima,| |Judaea||AE| |23|NEW
Caesarea, about 30 miles north of Joppa and about 70 miles northwest of Jerusalem, was founded by Herod the Great and named for Caesar Augustus. It was the seat of the Roman procurators and the Roman military headquarters in Judaea. The Pilate Stone, discovered here in 1961, is only archaeological find that names Pontius Pilate, by whose order Jesus was crucified. After the destruction of Jerusalem in 70 A.D., Caesarea was the provincial capital of the Judaea Province. Well into Byzantine times, Caesarea remained the capital. In the 630s, Arab Muslim armies took the region, but kept Caesarea as its administrative center until early 8th century. Caesarea's ruins are a national park on the Mediterranean coast of Israel, about halfway between Tel Aviv and Haifa.
RP110719. Bronze AE 23, Kadman Caesarea Maritima 4; RPC Online I 4862; Sofaer 7 ff.; Rosenberger 5 ff.; SNG ANS 753 ff.; Baramki 2 ff., aF, corrosion, weight 10.253 g, maximum diameter 23.3 mm, Caesarea Maritima (Keisaria, Israel) mint, 68 A.D.; obverse NEPΩN ΣEBAΣTOΣ KAIΣAP (from upper right), laureate head right; reverse KAIΣAPIA H ΠPOΣ ΣEBAΣTΩ ΛIME (from upper right), Tyche standing left, right foot resting on prow, bust in extended right hand, standard vertical behind in left hand, L I∆ in lower left field; $80.00 (80.80)


Judaea, Porcius Festus, Roman Procurator under Nero, 59 - 62 A.D.

|Porcius| |Festus|, |Judaea,| |Porcius| |Festus,| |Roman| |Procurator| |under| |Nero,| |59| |-| |62| |A.D.||prutah|NEW
"Now when Festus had come into his province, after three days he went up to Jerusalem from Caesarea. And the chief priests and the principal men of the Jews informed him against Paul; and they urged him, asking as a favor to have the man sent to Jerusalem, planning an ambush to kill him on the way. Festus replied that Paul was being kept at Caesarea, and that he himself intended to go there shortly...But Festus, wishing to do the Jews a favor, said to Paul, "Do you wish to go up to Jerusalem, and there be tried on these charges before me?" But Paul said, "I am standing before Caesar's tribunal, where I ought to be tried; to the Jews I have done no wrong, as you know very well. If then I am a wrongdoer, and have committed anything for which I deserve to die, I do not seek to escape death; but if there is nothing in their charges against me, no one can give me up to them. I appeal to Caesar." Then Festus, when he had conferred with his council, answered, "You have appealed to Caesar; to Caesar you shall go." - Acts 25:1-4,9-12
JD110779. Bronze prutah, Hendin 6380; Meshorer TJC 345; RPC I 4972; Sofaer, pl. 220, 66; BMC Palestine p. 266, 1, F, green patina, highlighting earthen deposits, uneven strike with weak areas, remnants of casting sprues, weight 2.421 g, maximum diameter 17.4 mm, die axis 0o, Jerusalem mint, 59 A.D.; obverse NEP/WNO/C (Nero) in wreath tied at the bottom with an X; reverse KAICAPO (Caesar) and date LE (year 5), palm frond; $30.00 (30.30)


Judean Kingdom, Herod the Great, 37 - 4 B.C.

|Herod| |the| |Great|, |Judean| |Kingdom,| |Herod| |the| |Great,| |37| |-| |4| |B.C.||2| |prutot|NEW
Herod the Great, a Roman client king of Judea, has been described as a madman who murdered his own family and a great many rabbis, prepared to commit any crime in order to gratify his unbounded ambition, and as the greatest builder in Jewish history. He is known for his colossal building projects throughout Judea, including his expansion of the Second Temple in Jerusalem, the construction of the port at Caesarea Maritima, the fortress at Masada and Herodium. Vital details of his life are recorded in the works of the 1st century Roman-Jewish historian Josephus.
JD110782. Bronze 2 prutot, Meshorer TJC p. 222 & pl. 44, 49; Hendin 6211a (S); Sofaer 19; HGC 10 654; RPC I 4905; BMC Palestine p. 223, 28 ff., VF, uneven off center strike with weak areas, porosity/pits, reverse edge beveled, sprue remnant, weight 2.448 g, maximum diameter 17.6 mm, die axis 0o, Jerusalem mint, c. 30 B.C.; obverse HPΩ∆OY BAΣIΛEΩΣ (Greek: of King Herod), cross surrounded by a open diadem; reverse shallow bowl on a tripod table, flanked by curved palm branches; scarce; $45.00 (45.45)


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D., Caesarea Maritima, Judaea

|Judaea| |&| |Palestine|, |Nero,| |13| |October| |54| |-| |9| |June| |68| |A.D.,| |Caesarea| |Maritima,| |Judaea||AE| |25|NEW
Caesarea, about 30 miles north of Joppa and about 70 miles northwest of Jerusalem, was founded by Herod the Great and named for Caesar Augustus. It was the seat of the Roman procurators and the Roman military headquarters in Judaea. The Pilate Stone, discovered here in 1961, is only archaeological find that names Pontius Pilate, by whose order Jesus was crucified. After the destruction of Jerusalem in 70 A.D., Caesarea was the provincial capital of the Judaea Province. Well into Byzantine times, Caesarea remained the capital. In the 630s, Arab Muslim armies took the region, but kept Caesarea as its administrative center until early 8th century. Caesarea's ruins are a national park on the Mediterranean coast of Israel, about halfway between Tel Aviv and Haifa.
RP110762. Bronze AE 25, Kadman Caesarea Maritima 4 (same dies); RPC Online I 4862; Sofaer 7 ff.; Rosenberger 5 ff.; SNG ANS 753 ff.; Baramki 2 ff., F, nice glossy green patina, porosity, light earthen deposits, obv. off center, rev. legend mostly off flan, weight 14.258 g, maximum diameter 24.8 mm, die axis 45o, Caesarea Maritima (Keisaria, Israel) mint, 68 A.D.; obverse NEPΩN ΣEBAΣTOΣ KAICAP (from upper right), laureate head right; reverse KAIΣAPIA H ΠPOΣ ΣEBAΣTΩ ΛIME (from upper right), Tyche standing left, right foot resting on prow, bust in extended right hand, standard vertical behind in left hand, L I∆ in lower left field; $130.00 (131.30)


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Sepphoris, Galilee, Judaea

|Judaea| |&| |Palestine|, |Trajan,| |25| |January| |98| |-| |8| |or| |9| |August| |117| |A.D.,| |Sepphoris,| |Galilee,| |Judaea||AE| |26|NEW
At the crossroads of the Via Maris and the Acre-Tiberias roads, Sepphoris was the capital of Galilee and Herod Antipas' first capital. Damaged by a riot, Antipas ordered Sepphoris be rebuilt. Flavius Josephus described the rebuilt Sepphoris as the "ornament of all Galilee." Since Sepphoris was only five miles north of Nazareth, Jesus and Joseph may have found work in Antipas' rebuilding projects. Sepphoris was built on a hill and visible for miles. This may be the city that Jesus spoke of when he said, "A city set on a hill cannot be hidden."
JD110765. Bronze AE 26, RPC Online III 3937; Rosenberger III 4; Sofaer 2; SNG ANS 1088; SNG Cop 3; BMC Palestine p. 1, 5; Meshorer City Coins 88; De Saulcy 2; Baramki AUB 3, Choice F, attractive portrait for the grade, brown tone, scratches, earthen deposits, weight 13.668 g, maximum diameter 26.1 mm, die axis 0o, Sepphoris (Tzipori National Park, Israel) mint, 98 - 117 A.D.; obverse TPAIANOΣ AYTOKPATΩP E∆ΩKEN, laureate head right; reverse eight-branched palm bearing two bunches of dates, ΣEΠ−ΦΩ/PH-NΩN (Sepphoris) in two lines divided by tree trunk; $160.00 (161.60)


The First Jewish Revolt, 66 - 70 A.D.

|First| |Jewish| |Revolt|, |The| |First| |Jewish| |Revolt,| |66| |-| |70| |A.D.||eighth| |shekel|NEW
On 14 April 70 A.D. Titus surrounded Jerusalem. He allowed pilgrims to enter to celebrate Passover but this was a trap to put pressure on supplies of food and water; he refused to allow them to leave. On 10 May he began his assault on the walls. The third wall fell on 25 May. The second wall fell on 30 May. On 20 July Titus stormed the Temple Mount. On 4 August 70 A.D. Titus destroyed the Temple. The Jewish fast of Tisha B'Av mourns the Fall of Jerusalem annually on this date.
JD110766. Bronze eighth shekel, Sofaer 47, Kadman III 37, Hendin 6398 (S), Meshorer TJC 214, SNG ANS 455, BMC Palestine -, VF, brown tone, scratches, uneven strike with weak areas, obverse edge beveled, traces of flan casting sprues, weight 4.568 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 0o, Jerusalem mint, year 4, 69 - 70 A.D.; obverse Paleo-Hebrew: To the redemption of Zion, Omer cup with a pearled rim; reverse Paleo-Hebrew: Year four, Lulav (myrtle, palm and willow branches tied together), flanked on each side by an etrog (citron - small lemon like fruit); $360.00 (363.60)


Judaea, Porcius Festus, Roman Procurator under Nero, 59 - 62 A.D.

|Porcius| |Festus|, |Judaea,| |Porcius| |Festus,| |Roman| |Procurator| |under| |Nero,| |59| |-| |62| |A.D.||prutah|NEW
"Now when Festus had come into his province, after three days he went up to Jerusalem from Caesarea. And the chief priests and the principal men of the Jews informed him against Paul; and they urged him, asking as a favor to have the man sent to Jerusalem, planning an ambush to kill him on the way. Festus replied that Paul was being kept at Caesarea, and that he himself intended to go there shortly...But Festus, wishing to do the Jews a favor, said to Paul, "Do you wish to go up to Jerusalem, and there be tried on these charges before me?" But Paul said, "I am standing before Caesar's tribunal, where I ought to be tried; to the Jews I have done no wrong, as you know very well. If then I am a wrongdoer, and have committed anything for which I deserve to die, I do not seek to escape death; but if there is nothing in their charges against me, no one can give me up to them. I appeal to Caesar." Then Festus, when he had conferred with his council, answered, "You have appealed to Caesar; to Caesar you shall go." - Acts 25:1-4,9-12
JD110767. Bronze prutah, Hendin 6380; Meshorer TJC 345; RPC I 4972; Sofaer, pl. 220, 66; BMC Palestine p. 266, 1, aVF, dark patina, highlighting earthen deposits, double struck, weight 1.878 g, maximum diameter 16.4 mm, Jerusalem mint, 59 A.D.; obverse NEP/WNO/C (Nero) in wreath tied at the bottom with an X; reverse KAICAPO (Caesar) and date LE (year 5), palm frond; $30.00 (30.30)




  






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