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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |Roman Provincial| ▸ |Roman Arabia||View Options:  |  |  |   

Roman Provincial Coins of Arabia
Nabataean Kingdom, Aretas IV, 9 B.C. - 40 A.D.

|Nabataean| |Kingdom|, |Nabataean| |Kingdom,| |Aretas| |IV,| |9| |B.C.| |-| |40| |A.D.||AE| |19|NEW
Aretas IV Philopatris was the greatest Nabataean king, ruling S. Palestine, most of Trans-Jordan, N. Arabia, and Damascus. During his reign, large religious centers - also serving as banks and trade clearinghouses - were established on the Hauran, in Petra, and at Avdat. Aretas was married to Huldu when he became king. Her profile was featured on coins until 16 A.D. After a short gap, the face of his second wife, Shuqailat, appeared on the coins. Aretas's daughter married Herod Antipas, tetrarch of the Galilee. When Antipas took another wife, Herodias, Aretas's daughter returned to her father, who went to war against Antipas and defeated him. The episode led to the beheading of John the Baptist. Antipas appealed to Tiberius, who dispatched the governor of Syria to attack Aretas. Paul mentions Aretas in connection with his visit to Damascus when he had to to be lowered from the wall in a basket to escape. Al-Khazneh, the treasury, one of the most elaborate buildings in Petra, is believed to have been Aretas' mausoleum.
GB111368. Bronze AE 19, cf. Barkay CN 186; Al-Qatanani 169; Meshorer Nabataean 114; BMC Arabia p. 8, 14; Huth 86; SNG ANS 6 1438, F, dark patina, highlighting earthen deposits, obv. off center, weight 4.058 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 0o, Petra (Jordan) mint, 16 - 40 A.D.; obverse jugate laureate and draped busts of Aretas IV and Shuqailat right; reverse two cornucopias crossed and filleted, Nabataean inscription in three lines: TTRH / SQY/TL (Aretas Shuqailat, read right to left, two lines above between the horns, the last line below); $60.00 (60.60)


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Bostra, Arabia

|Arabia|, |Trajan,| |25| |January| |98| |-| |8| |or| |9| |August| |117| |A.D.,| |Bostra,| |Arabia||drachm|NEW
Bostra was the northern Nabataean capital, until Trajan annexed the kingdom. It was then capital of Provincia Arabia, where the Third Legio Cyrenaica was garrisoned. The emperor Philip was born in Bostra and designated it a metropolis. This type was almost certainly struck with silver from the Nabatean treasury. Some specimens appear to have been overstruck on Nabatean drachms.
RY111184. Silver drachm, cf. Metcalf Tell Kalak 15 - 17; Sydenham Cappadocia 184, 185, 189 (Caesarea); BMC Galatia p. 54, 62 var. (Caesarea, no drapery), aVF, tight flan, encrusted, weight 3.115 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 180o, Bostra (Bosra, Syria) mint, Jan 112 - Aug 114 A.D.; obverse AYTOKP KAIC NEP TPAIAN CEB ΓEPM ΔAK, laureate bust right, slight drapery on left shoulder; reverse ΔHMAPX EΞ IΣ (or Z, or H) YΠAT Σ (holder of Tribunitian power for 16 (or 17, or 18) years, consul for the 6th time), Arabia standing facing, head left, branch in right, bundle of cinnamon sticks in left, camel left in background on left; from the Michael Arslan Collection; $60.00 (60.60)


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Bostra, Arabia

|Roman| |Arabia|, |Trajan,| |25| |January| |98| |-| |8| |or| |9| |August| |117| |A.D.,| |Bostra,| |Arabia||drachm|NEW
Bostra was the northern Nabataean capital, until Trajan annexed the kingdom. It was then capital of Provincia Arabia, where the Third Legio Cyrenaica was garrisoned. The emperor Philip was born in Bostra and designated it a metropolis. This type was almost certainly struck with silver from the Nabatean treasury. Some specimens appear to have been overstruck on Nabatean drachms.
RS111192. Silver drachm, cf. Metcalf Tell Kalak 15 - 17; Sydenham Cappadocia 184, 185, 189 (Caesarea); BMC Galatia p. 54, 62 var. (Caesarea, no drapery), aVF, dark tone, tight flan, a few small scratches, weight 2.912 g, maximum diameter 16.9 mm, die axis 180o, Bostra (Bosra, Syria) mint, Jan 112 - Aug 114 A.D.; obverse AYTOKP KAIC NEP TPAIAN CEB ΓEPM ΔAK, laureate bust right, slight drapery on left shoulder; reverse ΔHMAPX EΞ IΣ (or Z, or H) YΠAT Σ (holder of Tribunitian power for 16 (or 17, or 18) years, consul for the 6th time), Arabia standing facing, head left, branch in right, bundle of cinnamon sticks in left, camel left in background on left; from the Michael Arslan Collection; $120.00 (121.20)


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Bostra, Arabia

|Roman| |Arabia|, |Trajan,| |25| |January| |98| |-| |8| |or| |9| |August| |117| |A.D.,| |Bostra,| |Arabia||drachm|NEW
Bostra was the northern Nabataean capital, until Trajan annexed the kingdom. It was then capital of Provincia Arabia, where the Third Legio Cyrenaica was garrisoned. The emperor Philip was born in Bostra and designated it a metropolis. This type was almost certainly struck with silver from the Nabatean treasury. Some specimens appear to have been overstruck on Nabatean drachms.
RS111201. Silver drachm, cf. Metcalf Tell Kalak 15 - 17; Sydenham Cappadocia 184, 185, 189 (Caesarea); BMC Galatia p. 54, 62 var. (Caesarea, no drapery), aVF, toned, tight flan, a little rough, edge splits/crack, weight 3.027 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 180o, Bostra (Bosra, Syria) mint, Jan 112 - Aug 114 A.D.; obverse AYTOKP KAIC NEP TPAIAN CEB ΓEPM ΔAK, laureate bust right, slight drapery on left shoulder; reverse ΔHMAPX EΞ IΣ (or Z, or H) YΠAT Σ (holder of Tribunitian power for 16 (or 17, or 18) years, consul for the 6th time), Arabia standing facing, head left, branch in right, bundle of cinnamon sticks in left, camel left in background on left; from the Michael Arslan Collection; $80.00 (80.80)


Philadelphia, Arabia Petraea, 164 - 165 A.D.

|Roman| |Arabia|, |Philadelphia,| |Arabia| |Petraea,| |164| |-| |165| |A.D.||AE| |17|NEW
Rabbath-Ammon of the Old Testament, was renamed Philadelphia by Ptolemy II Philadelphus, and is today Amman, Jordan. Genesis identifies the Ammonites as descendants of Ben-ammi, who was born of an incestuous union between a drunken Lot and his younger daughter (Genesis 19:38). The Israelite Jephthah crossed the Jordan River "to attack the Ammonites, and the Lord delivered them into his hands" (Judges 11:32). Before the battle, he swore an oath that, for victory, he would sacrifice the first thing to greet him when he returned home - it was his daughter, his his only child, who came out to meet him with tambourines and dancing. At the sight of her, he tore his clothes and said, "Oh, my daughter, you have broken my heart!" and he fulfilled the vow he had made (Judges 11:34-39).
GB110783. Bronze AE 17, RPC IV.3 Online 6656.4; Sofaer 8; SNG ANS 1379; Spijkerman 3; Rosenberger 28; BMC Arabia p. 37, 2; Meshorer City Coins 257, aF, dark brown patina, earthen deposits, porosity, edge cracks, weight 3.190 g, maximum diameter 17.1 mm, die axis 0o, Philadelphia (Amman, Jordan) mint, rule of Marcus Aurelius, 164 - 165 A.D.; obverse ΦΙΛ KOI CYPI, wreathed in grain, veiled and draped bust of Demeter right, two stalks of grain before her; reverse ETOYC ZKC (year 277 [of the Pompeian Era]), two snakes with two stalks of grain between them, rising from cista mystica (wicker basket); Coin Archives records only one specimen of the type at auction in the last two decades; rare; $60.00 (60.60)


Nabataean Kingdom, Rabbel II and Gamilat, 70 - 106 A.D.

|Nabataean| |Kingdom|, |Nabataean| |Kingdom,| |Rabbel| |II| |and| |Gamilat,| |70| |-| |106| |A.D.||drachm|NEW
Rabbel II was the last Nabataean king. A child when he became king, his mother, Shuqailat, ruled in the early years. He was given the title, "He who gives life and salvation to his people," perhaps for subjugating Arab tribes. Upon his death, Trajan annexed the kingdom. On 22 March 106, Nabataea was incorporated into the new province of Arabia Petraea, with Bosra as its capital. The date on this coin is off flan, but it appears to be a die match to a year 22 coin.
GS110741. Billon drachm, Barkay CN 234 (same obv. die); Al-Qatanani 241, Meshorer Nabataean 154; cf. BMC Arabia p. 12, 1 & pl. II, 18 (date off flan); SNG ANS 1445 (same), VF, toned, tight flan cutting off most of legends, weight 3.240 g, maximum diameter 14.1 mm, die axis 0o, Petra (Jordan) mint, 91 - 92 A.D.; obverse Nabataean legend: "Rabbel the king, king of the Nabataeans, year 22" (date off flan), laureate and draped bust of Aretas IV with long hair right; reverse Nabataean legend: "Gamilat, his sister, queen of the Nabataeans", veiled bust of Gamilat right; $120.00 (121.20)


Nabataean Kingdom, Rabbel II, 70 - 106 A.D.

|Nabataean| |Kingdom|, |Nabataean| |Kingdom,| |Rabbel| |II,| |70| |-| |106| |A.D.||drachm|NEW
Rabbel II was the last Nabataean king. A child when he became king, his mother, Shuqailat, ruled in the early years. He was given the title, "He who gives life and salvation to his people," perhaps for subjugating Arab tribes. Upon his death, Trajan annexed the kingdom. On 22 March 106, Nabataea was incorporated into the new province of Arabia Petraea, with Bosra as its capital. The date on this coin is off flan, but the style matches coins struck from 88 - 92 A.D.
GS110752. Billon drachm, cf. Al-Qatanani 238 - 240 (yrs. 20 - 21); Meshorer Nabataean 153 (yr. 21); Barkay CN 231 - 233 (yrs. 19 - 21); BMC Arabia p. 12, 1 (date off flan), VF, toned, tight flan cutting off much of legends, weight 3.584 g, maximum diameter 13.5 mm, die axis 0o, Petra (Jordan) mint, c. 88 - 91 A.D.; obverse Nabataean legend, "Rabbel the king, of the Nabataeans, year [19 - 21?]" (date off flan), laureate and draped bust of Aretas IV with long hair right; reverse Nabataean legend, "Gamilath, his sister, queen of the Nabataeans", veiled bust of Gamilath right; $150.00 (151.50)


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Gerasa, Decapolis, Arabia

|Decapolis,| |Arabia| |&| |Syria|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.,| |Gerasa,| |Decapolis,| |Arabia||AE| |15|NEW
Jerash, Jordan is north of the national capital Amman. Inhabited since the Bronze Age, its known for the ruins of the walled Greco-Roman city Gerasa just outside the modern city. Josephus mentions the city as being principally inhabited by Syrians, but also having a small Jewish community. In 106, Jerash was absorbed into the Roman province of Arabia, which included Philadelphia (modern day Amman). Jerash is considered one of the largest and most well-preserved sites of Roman architecture outside of Italy. It is sometimes referred to as the "Pompeii of the Middle East" due to its size, extent of excavation and level of preservation.Gerasa
RP110795. Bronze AE 15, RPC Online III 4087 (10 spec.), Sofaer p. 172 & pl. 143, 7 (same dies); SNG Righetti 2533 (same); Spijkerman 6 (same), Rosenberger 9 (same); SNG ANS -, aF, green patina, earthen deposits, corrosion, weight 2.722 g, maximum diameter 14.8 mm, die axis 0o, Gerasa mint, 129 - 130 A.D.; obverse AYT K TPA AΔPIANOC C, laureate head right, ID (year 14 below); reverse APTEMI TYXH ΓEPACWN (Artemis Tyche of the people of Gerasa), draped bust of Artemis-Tyche right, hair knotted with taenia behind, bow before, quiver on left shoulder; $40.00 (40.40)


Nabataean Kingdom, Aretas IV and Phasael, 5 - 4 B.C.

|Nabataean| |Kingdom|, |Nabataean| |Kingdom,| |Aretas| |IV| |and| |Phasael,| |5| |-| |4| |B.C.||AE| |14|NEW
Possibly struck in the year of Christ's birth! Jesus was born sometime between 6 B.C. and 4 B.C. Matthew describes King Herod as the ruler during the time of the Nativity, and Herod died in 4 B.C. Later, in order to kill Jesus and eliminate him as a rival king, Herod ordered the "Massacre of the Innocents" - the killing of all male children in Bethlehem aged two years and under. This means that Jesus may have been up to two years old already by that time, and this also sets the Nativity between 6 and 4 B.C. The normal issue of this type has the monograms of Aretas (heth) and his son, Phasael, (peh sade).
GB110807. Bronze AE 14, Meshorer Nabataean 63A var. (monograms); Barkay CN 117 var. (same); Al-Qatanani 185t9 var. (same); Schmitte-Korte 1990 49 var. (same, VF, attractive dark green patina with reddish earthen highlighting, light scratches, weight 1.898 g, maximum diameter 14.3 mm, die axis 0o, Petra (Jordan) mint, c. 5 - 4 B.C.; obverse laureate head right; reverse two parallel cornucopias, tops left, tided with ribbon, palm frond on right; $200.00 (202.00)


Nabataean Kingdom, Rabbel II, 70 - 106 A.D.

|Nabataean| |Kingdom|, |Nabataean| |Kingdom,| |Rabbel| |II,| |70| |-| |106| |A.D.||drachm|NEW
Rabbel II was the last Nabataean king. A child when he became king, his mother, Shuqailat, ruled in the early years. He was given the title, "He who gives life and salvation to his people," perhaps for subjugating Arab tribes. Upon his death, Trajan annexed the kingdom. On 22 March 106, Nabataea was incorporated into the new province of Arabia Petraea, with Bosra as its capital. The date on this coin is off flan, but the style matches coins struck from 88 - 92 A.D.
GS110743. Billon drachm, cf. Al-Qatanani 238 - 240 (yrs. 20 - 21); Meshorer Nabataean 153 (yr. 21); Barkay CN 231 - 233 (yrs. 19 - 21); BMC Arabia p. 12, 1 (date off flan), VF, toned, tight flan cutting off most of legends, weight 3.316 g, maximum diameter 14.3 mm, die axis 0o, Petra (Jordan) mint, c. 88 - 91 A.D.; obverse Nabataean legend, "Rabbel the king, of the Nabataeans, year [19 - 21?]" (date off flan), laureate and draped bust of Aretas IV with long hair right; reverse Nabataean legend, "Gamilath, his sister, queen of the Nabataeans", veiled bust of Gamilath right; $190.00 (191.90)




  






REFERENCES

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