Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome To Forum Ancient Coins!!! All Items Purchased From Forum Ancient Coins Are Guaranteed Authentic For Eternity!!! Please Call Us If You Have Questions 252-646-1958 Expert Authentication - Accurate Descriptions - Reasonable Prices - Coins From Under $10 To Museum Quality Rarities Welcome To Forum Ancient Coins!!! All Items Purchased From Forum Ancient Coins Are Guaranteed Authentic For Eternity!!! Internet Challenged? We Are Happy To Take Your Order Over The Phone 252-646-1958 Explore Our Website And Find Joy In The History, Numismatics, Art, Mythology, And Geography Of Coins!!!

× Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Recent Additions

Sep 28, 2021

Sep 27, 2021

Sep 26, 2021

Sep 25, 2021

Sep 24, 2021

Sep 23, 2021

Sep 22, 2021

Sep 21, 2021

Sep 20, 2021

Sep 19, 2021

Sep 18, 2021

Sep 17, 2021

Sep 16, 2021

Sep 15, 2021

Sep 10, 2021
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |Roman Provincial| ▸ |Roman Arabia||View Options:  |  |  |   

Roman Provincial Coins of Arabia
Elagabalus, 16 May 218 - 11 March 222 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria

|Antioch|, |Elagabalus,| |16| |May| |218| |-| |11| |March| |222| |A.D.,| |Antioch,| |Seleucis| |and| |Pieria,| |Syria||tetradrachm|
From the Ray Nouri Collection.

This type is traditionally assigned to Antioch but McAlee identifies Laodicea as the most likely mint. McAlee notes, "After Septimius stripped Antioch of its privileges and conferred them on Laodicea-ad-Mare, some coins of Laodicea bear the legend 'Metropolis of the Four Provinces,' and others have a representation of four Tyches. The letters ∆ - E also regularly appear on the coins of Laodicea from the time of Elagabalus to that of Trebonianus Gallus." We attribute the type to Antioch, but clearly that is not certain.
RY94937. Billon tetradrachm, Bellinger Syria 42, SNG Cop 236, McAlee 758, Prieur 249 var. (both ties behind neck), Dura Coins -, F, toned, tight flan cutting off part of legends, reverse legend weak, weight 12.920 g, maximum diameter 25.2 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 219 A.D.; obverse AVT K M A ANTWNEINOC CEB, laureate bust right, drapery on left shoulder, one wreath tie on neck; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞOYCIAC YΠ B (holder of Tribunitian power, consul for the second time), eagle standing facing, wings spread, head left, wreath in beak, ∆ - E (∆ EΠAPCEIΩN - of the four eparchies) flanking eagle's head, star between legs; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $120.00 (€98.40)
 


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Bostra, Arabia

|Roman| |Arabia|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.,| |Bostra,| |Arabia||AE| |20|
Bostra was the northern Nabataean capital, until Trajan annexed the kingdom. It was then capital of Provincia Arabia, where the Third Legio Cyrenaica was garrisoned. The emperor Philip was born in Bostra and designated it a metropolis.
RY94938. Bronze AE 20, Spijkerman 2 (same dies); RPC Online III 4083 (21 spec.); Kindler Bostra 16; Sofaer 3; BMC Arabia p. 14, 3 - 6; SNG ANS 1168; SNG Cop -, F, irregular flan, orange earthen highlights, weight 6.129 g, maximum diameter 20.2 mm, die axis 180o, Bostra (Bosra, Syria) mint, 11 Aug 117 - 10 Jul 138 A.D.; obverse AYTOKPAT KAICAP TPAIANOC A∆PIANOC CEBACTOC, laureate bust right, drapery on left shoulder; reverse bust of Arabia right, wearing turreted crown and mantle blown out behind, small figure of a seated child held in each arm, APABIA below; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $60.00 (€49.20)
 


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D., Petra, Arabia

|Roman| |Arabia|, |Septimius| |Severus,| |9| |April| |193| |-| |4| |February| |211| |A.D.,| |Petra,| |Arabia||AE| |25|
UNESCO describes Petra as "one of the most precious cultural properties of man's cultural heritage." The BBC selected Petra as one of "the 40 places you have to see before you die." Click here to see Petra at BiblePlaces.com.
RY94927. Bronze AE 25, cf. Spijkerman 28 (same obv. die), Sofaer 27; Rosenberger IV 19; BMC Arabia p. 36, 15; SNG ANS -, F, attractive for grade, dark patina with orange earthen highlighting, irregularly shaped flan, weight 8.621 g, maximum diameter 24.6 mm, die axis 0o, Petra (Jordan) mint, 9 Apr 193 - 4 Feb 211 A.D.; obverse AV K Λ CEΠT CEOYHPOC IN ΠEP CEB (or similar), laureate head right; reverse METPOΠOΛIC A∆PIAN ΠETRA (or similar), Tyche seated left on rock, turreted and veiled, right hand extended (holding stele or open?), trophy over shoulder in left; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $50.00 (€41.00)
 


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D., Petra, Arabia

|Roman| |Arabia|, |Septimius| |Severus,| |9| |April| |193| |-| |4| |February| |211| |A.D.,| |Petra,| |Arabia||AE| |22|
Pliny the Elder and other writers identify Petra as the capital of the Nabataean Kingdom and the center of their caravan trade. Enclosed by towering rocks and watered by a perennial stream, Petra not only possessed the advantages of a fortress, but controlled the main commercial routes which passed through it to Gaza in the west, to Bosra and Damascus in the north, to Aqaba and Leuce Come on the Red Sea, and across the desert to the Persian Gulf. Click here to see Petra at BiblePlaces.com.The Decapolis
RY94928. Bronze AE 22, Spijkerman 34a (same dies), Rosenberger 21, SNG ANS 1369, BMC Arabia -, SNG Cop -, Lindgren -, Meshorer City-Coins -, F, desert patina with highlighting earthen deposits, centered on a tight flan, legends weak, weight 8.882 g, maximum diameter 22.3 mm, die axis 0o, Petra (Jordan) mint, 9 Apr 193 - 4 Feb 211 A.D.; obverse A K Λ CEΠ CEOVH CE (or similar), laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse A∆PI ΠETPA MHT, Tyche seated left on rocks inside distyle temple, stele extended in right, trophy over shoulder in left; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $80.00 (€65.60)
 


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D., Petra, Arabia

|Roman| |Arabia|, |Septimius| |Severus,| |9| |April| |193| |-| |4| |February| |211| |A.D.,| |Petra,| |Arabia||AE| |22|
Petra, the capital of the ancient Nabatean Kingdom, is a famous archaeological site in Jordan's southwestern desert. UNESCO describes Petra as "one of the most precious cultural properties of man's cultural heritage." The BBC selected Petra as one of "the 40 places you have to see before you die." Accessed via a narrow canyon called Al Siq, it contains tombs and temples carved into pink sandstone cliffs, earning its nickname, the "Rose City." Perhaps its most famous structure is 45m-high Al Khazneh, a temple with an ornate, Greek-style facade, and known as The Treasury. After the last Nabataean king, Rabbel II, died in 106 A.D., Trajan incorporated Nabataea into the Roman province Arabia Petraea. One of the latest known Nabataean language inscriptions, from 191 A.D., records "...This in the year 85 of the Eparchy [Roman Rule], in which Arabs destroyed the land." It seems likely that raiding Arab tribes extinguished what remained of a weakened Nabataean culture. In 747 A.D. what was left of the Nabataean cities was destroyed in a major earthquake.Treasury
RY94931. Bronze AE 22, Sofaer 30 (same dies); Rosenberger 22 (same dies); Spijkerman 27 var. (legends); BMC Arabia, p. 36, 15 var. (legends, left hand empty); SNG ANS -, gF, well centered on a tight flan cutting off parts of legends, dark patina with highlighting earthen deposits, weight 7.224 g, maximum diameter 21.6 mm, die axis 0o, Petra (Jordan) mint, 9 Apr 193 - 4 Feb 211 A.D.; obverse K Λ CEΠ - CEOVH CE, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; c/m on neck: ∆(?); reverse A∆PIA • ΠE-TPA MHTROΠOΛIC, Tyche seated left on rock, right hand extended and holding small stele, trophy of arms over shoulder in left hand; from the Ray Nouri Collection; scarce; $110.00 (€90.20)
 


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D., Petra, Arabia

|Roman| |Arabia|, |Caracalla,| |28| |January| |198| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.,| |Petra,| |Arabia||AE| |23|
Petra, the capital of the ancient Nabatean Kingdom, is a famous archaeological site in Jordan's southwestern desert. UNESCO describes Petra as "one of the most precious cultural properties of man's cultural heritage." The BBC selected Petra as one of "the 40 places you have to see before you die." Accessed via a narrow canyon called Al Siq, it contains tombs and temples carved into pink sandstone cliffs, earning its nickname, the "Rose City." Perhaps its most famous structure is 45m-high Al Khazneh, a temple with an ornate, Greek-style facade, and known as The Treasury. After the last Nabataean king, Rabbel II, died in 106 A.D., Trajan incorporated Nabataea into the Roman province Arabia Petraea. One of the latest known Nabataean language inscriptions, from 191 A.D., records "...This in the year 85 of the Eparchy [Roman Rule], in which Arabs destroyed the land." It seems likely that raiding Arab tribes extinguished what remained of a weakened Nabataean culture. In 747 A.D. what was left of the Nabataean cities was destroyed in a major earthquake.Treasury
RY94893. Bronze AE 23, Spijkerman pl. 51, 43a (same dies), cf. Sofaer 45 (normal style, legends), BMC Arabia -, SNG Cop -, SNG ANS -, SNG Hunterian -, Rosenberger IV -, aVF, dark patina with highlighting earthen deposits, barbaric style and epigraphy, weak incomplete legends, weight 10.894 g, maximum diameter 22.6 mm, die axis 0o, Petra (Jordan) mint, 28 Jan 198 - 209 A.D.; obverse ANTEINO M AVP - AVTOKRATO (or similar), laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from the front, barbaric style; reverse MHTPOΠO A∆P ΠETPO (or similar), Tyche seated left on pile of rocks, extending right hand, trophy over shoulder in left, barbaric style; from the Ray Nouri Collection; very rare; $130.00 (€106.60)
 


Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D., Philadelphia, Decapolis

|Decapolis,| |Arabia| |&| |Syria|, |Domitian,| |13| |September| |81| |-| |18| |September| |96| |A.D.,| |Philadelphia,| |Decapolis||AE| |26|
Rabbath-Ammon of the Old Testament, was renamed Philadelphia by Ptolemy II Philadelphus, and is today Amman, Jordan. Genesis identifies the Ammonites as descendants of Ben-ammi, who was born of an incestuous union between a drunken Lot and his younger daughter (Genesis 19:38). In the period of the Judges, the Israelite commander Jephthah crossed the Jordan River "to attack the Ammonites, and the Lord delivered them into his hands" (Judges 11:32). Before the battle, Jephthah swore an oath that in return for a victory over the Ammonites he would sacrifice the first thing to greet him when he returned home—a compulsive vow that forced him to commit an unthinkable act: When Jephthah arrived home in Mizpah, it was his daughter who came out to meet him with tambourines and dancing. She was his only child; apart from her he had neither son nor daughter. At the sight of her, he tore his clothes and said, "Oh, my daughter, you have broken my heart!" … And he fulfilled the vow he had made (Judges 11:34-39). -- Timothy P. Harrison, "Rabbath of the Ammonites"
RY94884. Bronze AE 26, RPC Online II 2107 (10 spec., 6 with c/m), Spijkerman 10a (same c/m), Sofaer 13 (same), Rosenberger 9 (same); c/m: Howgego 17, F, green patina, strike and legends a bit weak, scratches, light earthen deposits, porosity, weight 11.484 g, maximum diameter 25.9 mm, die axis 0o, Philadelphia (Amman, Jordan) mint, as caesar, 80 - 81 A.D.; obverse ∆OMITIANOC KAICAP, laureate head right, countermark: bearded head of Herakles (Melkarth) right; reverse ΦIΛA∆EΛΦEΩN L ΓMP (Philadelphia year 143), turreted and veiled head of Tyche right, palm frond over shoulder; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $80.00 (€65.60)
 


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D., Rabbathmoba, Arabia

|Roman| |Arabia|, |Septimius| |Severus,| |9| |April| |193| |-| |4| |February| |211| |A.D.,| |Rabbathmoba,| |Arabia||AE| |29|
Rabbathmoba (also called Areopolis or Aresopolis), on the Karak plateau, was probably the Biblical Ir-Moab conquered by Alexander Jannaeus. Its ruins are 18 kilometers north of Kerak in Jordan. Rabbath-Moba minted coins during the reigns of the Severan emperors between 193 and 222 A.D.
RY94887. Bronze AE 29, cf. Sofaer 7, Spijkerman 16, Rosenberger IV 3, SNG ANS -, F, irregular and broken flan, much of legends off flan, highlighting desert patina, weight 5.826 g, maximum diameter 28.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rabbathmoba (near Kerak, Jordan) mint, 9 Apr 193 - 4 Feb 211 A.D.; obverse AVT K Λ C CEOVHPOC (or similar), laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse PABBAΘMWBA (or similar), Tyche standing right, her left foot on river god, right hand resting on long scepter, small bust on her extended left hand; from the Ray Nouri Collection; scarce; $40.00 (€32.80)
 


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D., Petra, Arabia

|Roman| |Arabia|, |Septimius| |Severus,| |9| |April| |193| |-| |4| |February| |211| |A.D.,| |Petra,| |Arabia||AE| |23|
UNESCO describes Petra as "one of the most precious cultural properties of man's cultural heritage." The BBC selected Petra as one of "the 40 places you have to see before you die." Click here to see Petra at BiblePlaces.com.
RY94941. Bronze AE 23, cf. Spijkerman 29; BMC Arabia, p. 36, 15; SNG ANS -; c/m: Howgego 801, aF, green patina with orange earthen highlights, weight 7.171 g, maximum diameter 22.6 mm, die axis 180o, Petra (Jordan) mint, 9 Apr 193 - 4 Feb 211 A.D.; obverse AY K Λ CEΠT CEOYHPOΣ ΠEP CEB (or similar), laureate bust right, from behind, countermark: D• in round punch; reverse A∆P • ΠETPA MHTPOΠOΛ..., Tyche seated left on rock, right hand extended and open, trophy over shoulder in left hand; from the Ray Nouri Collection; scarce; $36.00 (€29.52)
 


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D., Petra, Arabia

|Roman| |Arabia|, |Caracalla,| |28| |January| |198| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.,| |Petra,| |Arabia||AE| |24|
Petra, the capital of the ancient Nabatean Kingdom, is a famous archaeological site in Jordan's southwestern desert. UNESCO describes Petra as "one of the most precious cultural properties of man's cultural heritage." The BBC selected Petra as one of "the 40 places you have to see before you die." Accessed via a narrow canyon called Al Siq, it contains tombs and temples carved into pink sandstone cliffs, earning its nickname, the "Rose City." Perhaps its most famous structure is 45m-high Al Khazneh, a temple with an ornate, Greek-style facade, and known as The Treasury. After the last Nabataean king, Rabbel II, died in 106 A.D., Trajan incorporated Nabataea into the Roman province Arabia Petraea. One of the latest known Nabataean language inscriptions, from 191 A.D., records "...This in the year 85 of the Eparchy [Roman Rule], in which Arabs destroyed the land." It seems likely that raiding Arab tribes extinguished what remained of a weakened Nabataean culture. In 747 A.D. what was left of the Nabataean cities was destroyed in a major earthquake.Treasury
RY94944. Bronze AE 24, Sofaer 45, Spijkerman 42; Rosenberger IV -, SNG ANS -, SNG Cop -, SNG Hunterian -, BMC Arabia -, aF, near black patina, orange earthen fill, weight 7.676 g, maximum diameter 23.9 mm, die axis 0o, Petra (Jordan) mint, 28 Jan 198 - 8 Apr 217 A.D.; obverse K M AVP ANTWN CEB, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse A∆PI ΠETPA MHT, Tyche seated left on pile of rocks, wearing turreted crown, extending right hand, trophy in left hand; from the Ray Nouri Collection; rare; $115.00 (€94.30)
 




  






REFERENCES

Burnett, A., M. Amandry, et al. Roman Provincial Coinage. (1992 - ).
Butcher, K. Coinage in Roman Syria: Northern Syria, 64 BC - AD 253. RNS Special Publication 34. (London, 2004).
Ganschow, T. Münzen von Kappadokien. Sammlung Henseler. (Istanbul, 2018).
Hill, G. Catalogue of the Greek Coins in the British Museum: Arabia, Mesopotamia and Persia. (London, 1922).
Kindler, A. The Coinage of Bostra. (Oxford, 1983).
Lindgren, H. & F. Kovacs. Ancient Bronze Coins of Asia Minor and the Levant. (1985).
Lindgren, H. Lindgren III: Ancient Greek Bronze Coins from the Lindgren Collection. (1993).
Meshorer, Y. City-Coins of Eretz Israel and the Decapolis in the Roman Period. (Jerusalem, 1985).
Meshorer, Y. Nabataean Coins. Qedem 3. (Jerusalem, 1975).
Meshorer, Y., et al. Coins of the Holy Land: The Abraham and Marian Sofaer Collection at the American Numismatic Society and The Israel Museum. ACNAC 8. (New York, 2013).
Metcalf, W. "The Tell Kalak Hoard and Trajan's Arabian Mint" in ANSMN 20 (1975).
Munro-Hay, S. Coinage of Arabia Felix: The Pre-Islamic Coinage of the Yemen. (Oxford, 2003).
Munro-Hay, S. "Coins of ancient South Arabia" in NC 154. (London, 1994). pp. 191 - 203, pl. 22 - 27.
Rosenberger, M. The Rosenberger Israel Collection Volume IV: The Coinage of Eastern Palestine, and legionary countermarks, Bar-Kochba overstruck. (Jerusalem, 1978).
Roman Provincial Coins (RPC) Online - http://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/.
Saulcy, F. de. Numismatique de la Terre Sainte: description des monnaies autonomes et impériales de la Palestine et de l 'Arabie Pétrée. (Paris, 1874).
Sear, D. Greek Imperial Coins and Their Values. (London, 1982).
Spijkerman, A. The Coins of the Decapolis and Provincia Arabia. (Jerusalem, 1978).
Sydenham, E. The Coinage of Caesarea in Cappadocia, with supplement by A. Malloy. (New York, 1978).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Volume 7: Cyprus to India. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain, Volume IV, Fitzwilliam Museum, Leake and General Collections, Part 8: Syria - Nabataea. (London, 1971).(London, 1940-1971).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain XII, The Hunterian Museum, University of Glasgow, Part 2: Roman Provincial Coins: Cyprus-Egypt. (Oxford, 2008).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Schweiz II, Katalog der Sammlung Jean-Pierre Righetti im Bernischen Historischen Museum. (Bern, 1993).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, USA, The Collection of the American Numismatic Society, Part 6: Palestine - South Arabia. (New York, 1981).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).
van Alfen, P. "A Die Study of the Eastern Arabian Abiel Coinage" in Coinage of the Caravan Kingdoms. (New York, 2010), pp. 549 - 594.
Wroth, W. A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Galatia, Cappadocia, and Syria. (London, 1899).

Catalog current as of Tuesday, September 28, 2021.
Page created in 3.426 seconds.
All coins are guaranteed for eternity