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Roman Provincial Coins of Asia Minor
Apameia, Phrygia, c. 133 - 48 B.C.

|Apameia|, |Apameia,| |Phrygia,| |c.| |133| |-| |48| |B.C.||AE| |20|NEW
Artemis was a goddess of virginity, women's concerns, the hunt and the underworld. The enigmatic cult statue covered in apparent fertility symbols was a unique combination of the Greek virgin-huntress Artemis with an indigenous Anatolian goddess.
GB96747. Bronze AE 20, SNG Cop 183; SNGvA 3470; SNG Munchen 123; BMC Phrygia p. 80, 67; Weber 7028; HGC 7 672, VF, green patina, minor flaw on face, light marks, areas of porosity, light deposits, weight 7.860 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, die axis 0o, Phrygia, Apameia (Dinar, Turkey) mint, magistrate Heraklei Eglogistes, c. 133 - 48 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse cultus-statue of Artemis Anaitis facing, wearing polos and veil, AΠAME downward on right, HPAKΛEI / EΓΛO (magistrate) in two downward lines on the left; ex David Wray Collection; $90.00 SALE |PRICE| $81.00
 


Marcus Aurelius, 7 March 161 - 17 March 180 A.D., Perga, Pamphylia

|Perga|, |Marcus| |Aurelius,| |7| |March| |161| |-| |17| |March| |180| |A.D.,| |Perga,| |Pamphylia||AE| |20|NEW
Perga was the capital of Pamphylia. Today it is a large site of ancient ruins, 15 kilometers (9.3 mi) east of Antalya on the southwestern Mediterranean coast of Turkey. During the Hellenistic period, Perga was one of the richest and most beautiful cities in the ancient world, famous for its temple of Artemis. It also is notable as the home of the renowned mathematician Apollonius of Perga.
RP96758. Bronze AE 20, RPC Online IV.3 T10660 (2 spec.), SNG Cop -, SNGvA -, BMC Pamphylia -, aVF, dark patina, centered, scratches, minor edge flaking, earthen deposits, weight 5.233 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 180o, Perga (near Antalya, Turkey) mint, 161 - 180 A.D; obverse ANTONIΩN-OC KAICAP AV, laureate bust left with slight drapery on far shoulder; reverse ΠEPΓ-AIΩN, Artemis standing slightly right, head right, wearing quiver over shoulder, holding arrow and bow; zero sales of this type recorded on Coin Archives for the last two decades; extremely rare; $90.00 SALE |PRICE| $81.00
 


Lucius Caesar, c. 1 B.C. - 2 A.D., Antiochia ad Maeandrum, Caria

|Caius| |&| |Lucius|, |Lucius| |Caesar,| |c.| |1| |B.C.| |-| |2| |A.D.,| |Antiochia| |ad| |Maeandrum,| |Caria||AE| |15|NEW
Lucius Caesar was a grandson of Augustus; the son of Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa and Julia the Elder, Augustus' only daughter. Lucius was adopted by his grandfather along with his older brother, Gaius Caesar. As the emperor's adopted sons and joint-heirs to the Roman Empire, Lucius and Gaius had promising political and military careers. However, Lucius died of a sudden illness on 20 August 2 A.D., in Massilia, Gaul, while traveling to meet the Roman army in Hispania. His brother Gaius also died at a relatively young age on 21 February 4 A.D. The untimely loss of both heirs compelled Augustus to redraw the line of succession by adopting Lucius' younger brother, Agrippa Postumus as well as his stepson, Tiberius on 26 June 4 A.D.
GB96098. Bronze AE 15, RPC Online I 5478A (2 spec., added post publication), F, green patina, porous, corrosion, off center, weight 2.446 g, maximum diameter 14.5 mm, die axis 0o, Antiochia ad Maeandrum (near Basaran Turkey) mint, c. 1 B.C. - 2 A.D.; obverse ΛEYKOIC KAICAP, bare head of Lucius Caesar right; reverse winged caduceus, A-N/T-I in two divided lines flanking above wings, all within laurel wreath; extremely rare; $180.00 SALE |PRICE| $162.00 ON RESERVE


Tiberius, 19 August 14 - 16 March 37 A.D., Eumeneia, Phrygia

|Eumeneia|, |Tiberius,| |19| |August| |14| |-| |16| |March| |37| |A.D.,| |Eumeneia,| |Phrygia||AE| |18|NEW
Eumenia, Phrygia was founded by Attalus II Philadelphus (159 - 138 B.C.) at the source of the Cludrus, near the Glaucus, and named after his brother Eumenes. Numerous inscriptions and many coins remain to show that Eumenia was an important and prosperous city under Roman rule. As early as the third century its population was in great part Christian, and it seems to have suffered much during the persecution of Diocletian. The remains of Eumenia are located in Denizli Province, Turkey on the shore of Lake Isikli near Civril.
RP96118. Bronze AE 18, RPC I 3147; SNG Munchen 206; SNG Cop 391; SNGvA 3589; Waddington 6026; BMC Phrygia p. 216, 37 corr., VF, nice dark green patina, porosity, off center, weight 5.175 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 0o, Eumeneia (near Civril, Turkey) mint, magistrate Kleon Agapetos, 19 Aug 14 - 16 Mar 37; obverse ΣEBAΣTOΣ, laureate head right; reverse Zeus standing facing, head left, wearing himation, phiale in right hand, resting left hand on scepter, star above crescent with horns up on left; KΛEΩN / AΓAPHTOC / EUME-NEΩN (Kleon Agapetos [magistrate], in three downward lines the first two on the right, the last on the left); ex Savoca blue auction 30 (21 Mar 2020), lot 1313; scarce; $115.00 SALE |PRICE| $103.00
 


Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D., Lampsakos, Mysia

|Lampsakos|, |Augustus,| |16| |January| |27| |B.C.| |-| |19| |August| |14| |A.D.,| |Lampsakos,| |Mysia||AE| |13|NEW
Priapus or Priapos was a minor rustic fertility god, protector of livestock, fruit plants, gardens and male genitalia. Priapus is marked by his absurdly oversized permanent erection, which gave rise to the medical term priapism. He became a popular figure in Roman erotic art and Latin literature, and is the subject of the often humorously obscene collection of verse called the Priapeia. Statues of Priapus were sometimes placed on boundaries and hung with signs which threatened sexual assault on trespassers.
RP95757. Bronze AE 13, RPC Online I 2275 corr. (says star vice lituus, 3 of 4 photographed specimens have lituus); BMC Mysia p. 87, 78, aF, porous, rough, tight flan, weight 2.102 g, maximum diameter 13.3 mm, die axis 0o, Lampsakos (Lapseki, Turkey) mint, 16 Jan 27 B.C. - 19 Aug 14 A.D.; obverse CEBACTOY, laureate head of Augustus right, lituus before; reverse ΛAMΨAK (counterclockwise around outwardly), ithyphallic Priapus standing left, right hand raised, left hand on hip; rare; $90.00 SALE |PRICE| $81.00
 


Aigeai, Cilicia, c. 47 - 27 B.C.

|Cilicia|, |Aigeai,| |Cilicia,| |c.| |47| |-| |27| |B.C.||AE| |18|NEW
Aegeae (also spelled Aigai, Aegaeae, Aigaiai, Aegae, or Aigeai) was a Greek town with a port on the coast of ancient Cilicia, on the north side of the Bay of Issus. It is now separated from the outlet of the Pyramus River (the modern Ceyhan) by a long narrow estuary called Gulf of Alexandretta. In 47 B.C., Julius Caesar, during his stay in Tarsus, reorganized Cilicia. Aegeae was pro-Caesarian and demonstrating their support began a new town era in that same year. Under Rome Aegeae was a place of some importance. It was Christianised at an early date.
GB97039. Bronze AE 18, Bloesch 245 ff. (5 spec.); SNG Levante 1685; SNGvA 5444; BMC Lycaonia p. 22, 18; SNG BnF -, VF, nice green patina with earthen highlighting, scratches, some porosity, flan shape slightly irregular, weight 3.088 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 0o, Aigeai (near Yumurtalik, Turkey) mint, 34 - 33 B.C. (if year 14); obverse diademed head of king (Alexander the Great?) right; reverse Nike advancing left, wreath extended in right hand, palm frond over shoulder in left hand, AIΓE/AIΩN in two lines in the left field, MH right (magistrate initials?), ∆I (year 14 or magistrate initials?) lower left; $140.00 SALE |PRICE| $126.00
 


Tiberius, 19 August 14 - 16 March 37 A.D., Tripolis ad Maeandrum, Lydia

|Other| |Lydia|, |Tiberius,| |19| |August| |14| |-| |16| |March| |37| |A.D.,| |Tripolis| |ad| |Maeandrum,| |Lydia||AE| |18|NEW
Tripolis on the Meander (Tripolis ad Maeandrum, also Neapolis, Apollonia, and Antoninopolis) was on the borders of Phrygia, Caria and Lydia, on the northern bank of the upper course of the Maeander, and on the road leading from Sardes by Philadelphia to Laodicea ad Lycum. It was 20 km to the northwest of Hierapolis. The earliest mention of Tripolis is by Pliny (v. 30), who treats it as Lydian. Ptolemy (v. 2. § 18) and Stephanus of Byzantium describe it as Carian. Hierocles (p. 669) likewise calls it Lydian. Some modern academics have placed it in Phrygia. The ruins of Tripolis ad Maeandrum mostly date from the Roman and Byzantine periods and include a theater, baths, city walls, and a necropolis. An ancient church, dating back 1,500 years, was unearthed in 2013.
RP97044. Bronze AE 18, RPC Online I 3055 (9 spec.); Imhoof KM p. 188, 3; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -; BMC Lydia -, aVF, dark patina with highlighting buff earthen deposits, porosity, tight flan cutting off part of legends, weight 6.151 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 0o, Tripolis ad Maeandrum (near Yenicekent, Turkey) mint, magistrate Menandrou Metrodoros Philokaisar; obverse TIBEPION KAIΣAPA TPIΠOΛEITAI, laureate head right; reverse MENAN∆POΣ MHTPO∆ΩPOY ΦIΛOKAICAP, radiate head of Helios right, O/T/∆ ([philokaisar] for the 4th time) in right field; scarce; $125.00 SALE |PRICE| $113.00
 


Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D., Uncertain Mint, Anatolia or Syria

|Roman| |Asia|, |Augustus,| |16| |January| |27| |B.C.| |-| |19| |August| |14| |A.D.,| |Uncertain| |Mint,| |Anatolia| |or| |Syria||AE| |27|NEW
The mint, the quaestor who struck this type, and even the identity of the person in the portrait remain uncertain. The type has previously been attributed to Macedonia and the portrait identified as Brutus (Friedlander) or Caesar (Grant). David Sear notes the type has never been found in Macedonia. Finds point to Syria or Anatolia. It is possible that the type was issued, with his own portrait, by Sosius, a general under Marc Antony who was quaestor in 39 B.C. Much more likely, however, the portrait is of Augustus.
RP96854. Bronze AE 27, RPC I 5409; Sear CRI 957 (Syria); AMNG II 29 (Pella), gF, dark green patina, flan adjustment marks, strike a little weak, edge crack, weight 14.989 g, maximum diameter 26.7 mm, die axis 0o, uncertain Anatolian or Syrian mint, c. 39 B.C.(?); obverse bare head right; reverse hasta (spear), sella quaestoria (quaestor's seat of office), and fiscus (imperial treasury), Q (quaestor) below; previously a rare type but recent finds have made it easier to acquire; from a Florida collector, ex Trusted Coins; $550.00 SALE |PRICE| $495.00
 


Pontus (Amisos?), Roman Quaestor (Lucius Lucullus?), c. 100 - 50 B.C.

|Pontos|, |Pontus| |(Amisos?),| |Roman| |Quaestor| |(Lucius| |Lucullus?),| |c.| |100| |-| |50| |B.C.||AE| |21|
The Q identifies the bare male head as a Roman Quaestor. This letter is not noted in RPC but is visible here and clear on other examples known to Forum. Perhaps the image is of Lucius Lucullus, an important Quaestor of Sulla, about whom Plutarch wrote. The reverse legend, the Latin FETIA, refers to the fetial ceremony, part of the treaty making process, during which a pig was sacrificed to sanctify the oaths. The mint location is unknown but Imhoof-Blumer placed it at Amisus, where Leypold acquired his specimen.
RP96461. Brass AE 21, RPC I 2156, SNG Leypold I p. 24, 69; Imhoof-Blumer GRMK 281, F, dark patina, flat centers, scratches, reverse die wear, reverse off center, weight 7.913 g, maximum diameter 20.5 mm, die axis 0o, Pontos (Amisos?) mint, c. 80 B.C.(?); obverse bare male head right, Q (quaestor) below; reverse two men standing, holding a pig between them, each with a hand raised, taking an oath of fealty, FETA IA in exergue; rare; $225.00 SALE |PRICE| $195.00
 


Pergamon, Mysia, c. 133 - 16 B.C.

|Pergamon|, |Pergamon,| |Mysia,| |c.| |133| |-| |16| |B.C.||AE| |22|
Pergamon, Mysia was located to the northwest of the modern city of Bergama, Turkey, 16 miles (26 km) from the Aegean Sea on a promontory on the north side of the Caicus (Bakircay) River. It was the capital of the Kingdom of Pergamon under the Attalid dynasty, 281-133 B.C. When Attalus III died without an heir in 133 B.C., to prevent a civil war, he bequeathed the kingdom to the Roman Republic. Pergamon is cited in the book of Revelation as one of the seven churches of Asia.
GB93758. Bronze AE 22, SNG BnF 1790; SNGvA 1379; SNG Tüb 2445; SNG Cop 365; BMC Mysia p. 128, 142, VF, brown tone with brassy high points, oval flan, marks, small edge split, weight 9.616 g, maximum diameter 22.4 mm, die axis 0o, Pergamon (Bergama, Turkey) mint, Roman rule, c. 133 - 16 B.C.; obverse helmeted head of Athena right, crested Attic helmet ornamented with a star, EΠI ΠEPΓAMOY below; reverse Nike standing right, crowning ethnic with wreath in in extended right hand, palm frond over left shoulder in left hand, ΠEPΓAMHNΩN downward on right; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $80.00 SALE |PRICE| $72.00
 




  







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