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Roman Provincial Coins of Macedonia

After the defeat of Perseus at the battle of Pydna, for twenty years, from 168 to 148 B.C., Macedonia was divided into four autonomous administrative regions. To weaken the power of the area and increase dependence on the empire, Rome took control of the mines and forests, demanded half of all taxes collected and banned trade between the regions. No coins were issued from 168 - 158 B.C. Between 158 and 148 B.C. the first (PROTES) region minted a large number of tetradrachms at its capital, Amphipolis. The second (DEUTERAS) region minted a small number of very rare tetradrachm at Thessalonica. The third region, its capital at Pella, and the fourth region, its capital at Heraclea Lynci, did not issue silver. In 148 B.C. the regions were reunited as a Roman province. Silver coinage was not struck for another half century, however, bronze coins were issued by governors, praetors, quaestors and individual cities. In 93 B.C., silver coinage resumed, the most prolific issue was that of the quaestor Aesillas. Macedonian cities continued to issue coinage in imperial times, some without the imperial bust.

Koinon of Macedonia, Reigns of Elagabalus - Gordian III, c. 218 - 244 A.D., Alexander and Bucephalus

|Koinon| |of| |Macedonia|, |Koinon| |of| |Macedonia,| |Reigns| |of| |Elagabalus| |-| |Gordian| |III,| |c.| |218| |-| |244| |A.D.,| |Alexander| |and| |Bucephalus||AE| |26|NEW
Plutarch tells the story of how, in 344 B.C. Philonicus the Thessalian, a horse dealer, offered a massive wild stallion to Alexander's father, King Philip II. Since no one could tame the animal, Philip was not interested. Alexander, however, seeing that the horse was afraid of his own shadow, promised to pay for the horse himself should he fail to tame it. He was given a chance and surprised all by subduing it. Alexander spoke soothingly to the horse and turned it towards the sun so that it could no longer see its shadow. Eventually, Bucephalus allowed Alexander to ride him. Embarrassed, Philip commented, "O my son, look thee out a kingdom equal to and worthy of thyself, for Macedonia is too little for thee." Alexander named the horse Bucephalus because the horse's head seemed "as broad as a bull's." Bucephalus died of battle wounds in 326 B.C., in Alexander's last battle. Alexander founded the city of Bucephala (thought to be the modern town of Jhelum, Pakistan) in memory of his wonderful horse.
RP96104. Bronze AE 26, BMC Macedonia p. 23, 106; AMNG III-1 p. 123, 482; RPC Online -; SNG Cop -; SNG Hunterian -; SNG Sarglos -, VF, bumps, porosity, obverse slightly off center, flan flaw (pit) center obverse, weight 10.747 g, maximum diameter 26.2 mm, die axis 180o, Macedonia, Beroea(?) mint, c. 231 - 235 A.D.; obverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, head of Alexander the Great right, as Herakles, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress; reverse KOI MAKE∆ONΩN B NEΩ KO, Alexander galloping his horse Bucephalus right, wearing military garb, cloak fluttering behind, spear in right hand, reins in left hand, no symbol below; only one sale of this type recorded on Coin Archives for the last two decades; rare variety; $140.00 SALE |PRICE| $126.00
 


Macedonia Prima Merida (First Region), Roman Dependent Republic, c. 168 - 148 B.C.

|Roman| |Macedonia|, |Macedonia| |Prima| |Merida| |(First| |Region),| |Roman| |Dependent| |Republic,| |c.| |168| |-| |148| |B.C.||tetradrachm|NEW
The monograms appear as (above) - (lower left) - (lower right). In 168 B.C., Rome split Macedonia into four republics which nominally managed their own internal affairs but were denied the right to make external agreements. The Prima Merida (1st region), with its capital at Amphipolis, included the area between the Strymonas and Nestos rivers, up to the eastern lands of Nestos, without the towns of Aenos, Maroneia and Avdera.
GS95928. Silver tetradrachm, Prokopov Silver, group 2A, 426 (O85/R322); SNG Ash 3297; SNG Saroglos 975; SNG Delepierre 1069; BMC Macedonia p. 8, 7; AMNG III.1 176; HGC 3.1 1103, Choice VF, old collection toning, marks, weight 17.015 g, maximum diameter 29.9 mm, die axis 0o, Amphipolis mint, issue 3, c. 158 - 148 B.C.; obverse Macedonian shield (the whole obverse represents a shield) with bust of mature Artemis Tauropolos (Diana to the Romans) at the center facing right, bow and quiver at her shoulder; reverse MAKE∆ONΩN / ΠPΩTHΣ (First Macedonia) above and below club, thunderbolt (control) left, ΣHY∆P monogram (control) above, TKP monogram (control) below left, TYPME monogram (control) bottom right, all within oak wreath; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $550.00 SALE |PRICE| $495.00
 


Koinon of Macedonia, Portrait of Alexander the Great, 231 - 235 A.D.

|Koinon| |of| |Macedonia|, |Koinon| |of| |Macedonia,| |Portrait| |of| |Alexander| |the| |Great,| |231| |-| |235| |A.D.||triassarion|
The Macedonian Koinon (community) was the political organization governing the autonomous Roman province of Macedonia and was responsible for issuing coinage. The individual cities, as members of the Koinon, sent representatives to participate in popular assembly several times each year. The high point of the year was celebrations and matches in honor of Alexander the Great and the Roman emperor held in Beroea (modern Verria) located about 75 km. west of Thessaloniki. This was the provincial center of the emperor cult, with the appropriate temple and privileges, first granted to the Koinon by Nerva. The title Neokoros, or "temple guardians" was highly prized and thus advertised on coins. Under Elagabalus, the Koinon received a second neokorie, indicated by B (the Greek number two) or rarely ∆IC (double in Greek). The title was rescinded but later restored by Severus Alexander, probably in 231 A.D.
GB92396. Bronze triassarion, AMNG III 341, RPC Online -, BMC Macedonia -, SNG Cop -, SNG Hunterian -, SNG Saroglos -, McClean -, Lindgren -, VF/F, near black patina, high points a bit flatly struck, light corrosion heavier at edge, central depressions, weight 9.353 g, maximum diameter 25.6 mm, die axis 180o, Macedonia, Beroea(?) mint, reign of Severus Alexander, 231 - 235; obverse AΛEΞAN∆POY clockwise on right, diademed head of Alexander the Great right; reverse KOINON MAKE∆ ONΩN NE (NE ligate), Zeus standing half left, head left, nude, thunderbolt in right hand, long scepter vertical in left hand; very rare; $240.00 SALE |PRICE| $216.00
 


Thessalonika, Macedonia, c. 54 - 68 A.D.

|Thessalonika|, |Thessalonika,| |Macedonia,| |c.| |54| |-| |68| |A.D.||AE| |16|
Thessalonica was founded around 315 B.C. by Cassander, King of Macedonia, on or near the site of the ancient town of Therma. He named it after his wife Thessalonike, a daughter of Philip II and a half-sister of Alexander the Great. In 168 B.C. it became the capital of Macedonia Secunda and in 146 B.C. it was made the capital of the whole Roman province of Macedonia. Due to its port and location at the intersection of two major Roman roads, Thessalonica grew to become the most important city in Macedonia. Thessalonica was important in the spread of Christianity; the First Epistle to the Thessalonians written by Paul the Apostle is the first written book of the New Testament.
GB92061. Bronze AE 16, Touratsoglou G.I/A; RPC I 1607 (13 spec. online); SNG Hunterian I 682; McClean 3776; AMNG III taf. XXIII, 23; BMC Macedonia -; SNG Cop -; SNG ANS -, aVF, green patina, tight flan, weight 4.078 g, maximum diameter 16.0 mm, die axis 180o, Thessalonika (Salonika, Greece) mint, reign of Nero(?), c. 54 - 68 A.D.; obverse horse trotting right, crescent with horns upward above, star below raised foreleg; reverse ΘEΣ/ΣAΛON/IKEΩN in three lines within laurel wreath; ex CHS Basel Numismatics; very rare; $160.00 SALE |PRICE| $144.00
 


Amphipolis, Macedonia, 148 - 32 B.C.

|Amphipolis|, |Amphipolis,| |Macedonia,| |148| |-| |32| |B.C.||AE| |17|
Amphipolis was a magnificent ancient Greek polis (city), and later a Roman city, whose impressive remains can still be seen. It is famous in history for events such as the battle between the Spartans and Athenians in 422 B.C., and also as the place where Alexander the Great prepared for campaigns leading to his invasion of Asia. Alexander's three finest admirals, Nearchus, Androsthenes and Laomedon, resided in this city and it is also the place where, after Alexander's death, his wife Roxane and their small son Alexander IV were exiled and later murdered. Excavations in and around the city have revealed important buildings, ancient walls and tombs. The finds are displayed at the archaeological museum of Amphipolis. At the nearby vast Kasta burial mound, an important ancient Macedonian tomb has recently been revealed. The unique and beautiful "Lion of Amphipolis" monument nearby is a popular destination for visitors.Lion_of_Amphipolis
GB88169. Bronze AE 17, Lindgren II 929, HGC 3.1 433 (R1), SNG ANS 120 - 122 var. (grain ear vice club, no monogram), SNG Cop -, SNG Dreer -, BMC Macedonia -, VF, green patina, tight flan, obverse off center, weight 3.930 g, maximum diameter 16.8 mm, die axis 0o, Amphipolis mint, Roman rule, 148 - 31 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right clad in Nemean Lion's scalp headdress forelegs tied at neck; reverse AMΦIΠOΛITΩN, lion standing right, club below, monogram (magistrate or control symbol) lower right; ex Triskeles auction 26 (VAuction 334), lot 47; rare; $100.00 SALE |PRICE| $90.00
 


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D., Amphipolis, Macedonia

|Amphipolis|, |Septimius| |Severus,| |9| |April| |193| |-| |4| |February| |211| |A.D.,| |Amphipolis,| |Macedonia||AE| |23|
Excavations of Roman Amphipolis have revealed traces of all the impressive architecture one would expect from a thriving Roman city. A bridge, gymnasium, public and private monuments, sanctuaries, and cemeteries all attest to the city's prosperity. From the early Christian period (after 500 CE) there are traces of four basilicas, a large rectangular building which may have been a bishop's residence, and a church. -- Ancient History Encyclopedia
RP84023. Bronze AE 23, BMC Macedonia p. 58, 126 (same obverse die); Varbanov 3268 (R4) var. (obv. legend); Moushmov 6106; SNG Cop -, aVF, attractive portrait, dark patina, porous, central cavities, weight 8.283 g, maximum diameter 23.1 mm, die axis 0o, Amphipolis mint, 9 Apr 193 - 4 Feb 211 A.D.; obverse Λ CEΠT CE-OYHPOC ΠEP A-YΓ (YHP ligate), laureate and draped bust right; reverse AMΦIΠOΛEITWN, Tyche of Amphipolis seated left on a throne, wearing kalathos, veil, long chiton and mantle, phiale in extended right hand, star below seat; $70.00 SALE |PRICE| $63.00
 


Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D., Thessalonica, Macedonia

|Thessalonika|, |Gordian| |III,| |29| |July| |238| |-| |25| |February| |244| |A.D.,| |Thessalonica,| |Macedonia||AE| |26|
The god Kabeiros is similar in appearance to Dionysos and the rites of his cult were likely similar to those of the Dionysian mysteries. The attributes of Kabeiros are a rhyton and hammer.
RP83493. Bronze AE 26, Touratsoglou p. 262, 25 (V2/R20), Varbanov III 4545 (R3), SNG Hunterian 714, SNG Cop 426, SNG Evelpidis 1348, BMC Macedonia p. 124, 116, aVF, excellent portrait, green patina, large central dimple on obverse, bumps and marks, some light corrosion, weight 9.207 g, maximum diameter 25.7 mm, die axis 180o, Thessalonika (Salonika, Greece) mint, 29 Jul 238 - 25 Feb 244 A.D.; obverse AV K M ANT ΓOP∆IANOC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse ΘECCAΛONIKEΩN, Nike advancing left, Kabeiros holding hammer in her right hand, palm frond in her left hand; $80.00 SALE |PRICE| $72.00
 


Severus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D., Thessalonica, Macedonia

|Roman| |Macedonia|, |Severus| |Alexander,| |13| |March| |222| |-| |March| |235| |A.D.,| |Thessalonica,| |Macedonia||AE| |27|
Thessalonica was founded around 315 B.C. by Cassander, King of Macedonia, on or near the site of the ancient town of Therma. He named it after his wife Thessalonike, a daughter of Philip II and a half-sister of Alexander the Great. In 168 B.C. it became the capital of Macedonia Secunda and in 146 B.C. it was made the capital of the whole Roman province of Macedonia. Due to its port and location at the intersection of two major Roman roads, Thessalonica grew to become the most important city in Macedonia. Thessalonica was important in the spread of Christianity; the First Epistle to the Thessalonians written by Paul the Apostle is the first written book of the New Testament.
RP79950. Bronze AE 27, Touratsoglou p. 246, 5 (V6/-, unlisted rev. die); SNG Cop 422; Varbanov III 4471 (R3); BMC Macedonia p. 123, 109; SNG ANS 873 var. (bust from behind), VF, well centered and struck, nice green patina, small edge split, flan crack, light marks, weight 11.341 g, maximum diameter 26.7 mm, die axis 0o, Thessalonika (Salonika, Greece) mint, 13 Mar 222 - Mar 235 A.D.; obverse AV K M AV CEV AΛEΞAN∆POC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from the front; reverse ΘECCAΛONIKEΩN, Nike advancing left, Kabeiros in extended right hand, palm frond in left hand; scarce; $70.00 SALE |PRICE| $63.00
 


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D., Amphipolis, Macedonia

|Amphipolis|, |Caracalla,| |28| |January| |198| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.,| |Amphipolis,| |Macedonia||AE| |23|
Tyche (Greek for luck; the Roman equivalent was Fortuna) was the presiding tutelary deity that governed the fortune and prosperity of a city, its destiny. Increasingly during the Hellenistic period, cities had their own specific iconic version of Tyche, wearing a mural crown (a crown like the walls of the city).
RP83502. Bronze AE 23, Varbanov III 3277 (R4); BMC Macedonia p. 59, 128; SNG Hunterian 778; SNG Cop 112 var. (obv. leg.); SNG ANS -, VF, green patina, weight 6.845 g, maximum diameter 22.8 mm, die axis 180o, Amphipolis mint, 28 Jan 198 - 8 Apr 217 A.D.; obverse AVT K - ANTΩNOINOC, laureate and draped bust right, from behind; reverse AMΦIΠOΛEITΩN, city goddess enthroned left, wearing turreted crown, patera in extended right hand, left hand at her side; $70.00 SALE |PRICE| $63.00
 


Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D., Amphipolis, Macedonia

|Amphipolis|, |Domitian,| |13| |September| |81| |-| |18| |September| |96| |A.D.,| |Amphipolis,| |Macedonia||AE| |22|
Amphipolis was home to an imperial cult, worshiping the living emperor, and to a cult dedicated to Artemis Tauropolos. Artemis' most distinctive attributes were her bow, arrows and quiver, but she was also called the torch-bearing goddess. This reverse likely depicts a local statue of Artemis Tauropolos. Artemis was honored at Amphipolis with torch-races called Lampadephoria.
RP79971. Bronze AE 22, RPC II 339; BMC Macedonia p. 54, 91 - 93; SNG ANS 177; SNG Cop 100; Lindgren II 976, F, green patina, weight 5.991 g, maximum diameter 21.5 mm, die axis 180o, Amphipolis mint, 13 Sep 81 - 18 Sep 96 A.D.; obverse AYTO KAICAP ∆OMITIANOC, laureate head right; reverse AMΦIΠOΛEITΩN, Artemis Tauropolos standing left, kalathos on head, long torch before her in right hand, small branch in left hand downward at side, grounded shield behind; $70.00 SALE |PRICE| $63.00
 




  






REFERENCES|

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