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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |The Twelve Caesars||View Options:  |  |  | 

Roman Coins of the 12 Caesars
Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D., Amphipolis, Macedonia

|Amphipolis|, |Augustus,| |16| |January| |27| |B.C.| |-| |19| |August| |14| |A.D.,| |Amphipolis,| |Macedonia|, |AE| |23|
Tauropolos is an epithet for the goddess Artemis, variously interpreted to mean worshiped at Tauris (Crimea), or pulled by a yoke of bulls, or the hunting bull goddess. A statue of Artemis Tauropolos by Iphigenia in her temple at Brauron in Attica was said to have been from the Taurians. The festival of Artemis at Athens was called the Tauropolia.
RP92733. Bronze AE 23, RPC I 1630; SNG ANS 162; SNG Cop 92; AMNG III 71; BMC Macedonia p. 52, 76; Varbanov III 3117 (R5), F, spots of corrosion, deposits and encrustations, a little off center, weight 6.708 g, maximum diameter 22.6 mm, die axis 0o, Amphipolis mint, 16 Jan 27 B.C. - 19 Aug 14 A.D.; obverse KAIΣAROΣ ΣEBAΣTOΣ, bare head right; reverse Artemis Tauropolos seated facing riding on bull galloping right, holding billowing veil with both hands, ∆HMOY AMΦIΠOΛITΩN in two lines below; $140.00 SALE |PRICE| $126.00


Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D., Judaea Capta, Caesarea Maritima, Judaea

|Domitian|, |Domitian,| |13| |September| |81| |-| |18| |September| |96| |A.D.,| |Judaea| |Capta,| |Caesarea| |Maritima,| |Judaea|, |AE| |25|
This Judaea Capta type was minted at Caesarea Maritima, Judaea. After Herod's death, Caesarea was the seat of the Roman procurator and capital of Roman Palestine for about 500 years. A riot in 66 A.D. between Syrians and Jews in the city led to the First Jewish Revolt. Paul was delivered to Caesarea when his life was threatened in Jerusalem (Acts 9:30). From Caesarea, Paul departed to Tarsus, his birthplace. Paul met the church in Caesarea (Acts 18:22; 21:8,16). Finally, Paul was taken prisoner (Acts 23:23,33) and returned to Caesarea where he was tried before Festus and King Agrippa (Acts 25:1-4; 24:6-13)
JD93571. Bronze AE 25, Hendin 1455, Meshorer TJC 392, RPC II 2305, SNG ANS 492- 494, VF, red-brown patina, light marks, light encrustations, slightly off center, small edge split, weight 8.682 g, maximum diameter 24.7 mm, die axis 0o, Caesarea Maritima mint, c. 83 A.D.; obverse IMP DOMITIANVS CAES AVG GERMANICVS, laureate head left; reverse Athena standing facing, helmeted head turned left, placing helmet on trophy of captured arms with right hand, spear and round shield in left hand; trophy, on left, consists of cuirass, two shields and spears, two crossed greaves at bottom; ex Roma Numismatics, e-sale 53 (07 Feb 2019), lot 493; $125.00 SALE |PRICE| $113.00


Tiberius, 19 August 14 - 16 March 37 A.D.

|Tiberius|, |Tiberius,| |19| |August| |14| |-| |16| |March| |37| |A.D.|, |semis|
The Altar of Lugdunum and the Sanctuary of the Three Gauls were dedicated by Augustus on 1 August 10 B.C., the very same day Drusus' son, the future emperor Claudius, was born in Lugdunum. All the notable men of Gaul were invited. Caius Julius Vercondaridubnus, a member of the Aedui tribe, was the first priest of the new imperial cult. The altar, which was engraved with the names of 60 Gallic tribes, was featured prominently on coins from the Lugdunum mint for many years.
RB93086. Orichalcum semis, RIC I p. 57, A246; BMCRE I p. 96, A588, cf. SRCV I 1773 (quadrans), Hunter I -, F, rough bumps and corrosion, die break reverse bottom, weight 3.251 g, maximum diameter 18.6 mm, die axis 135o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, as caesar, 12 A.D.; obverse TI CAESAR AVGVST F IMPERAT VII, laureate head right; reverse ROM ET AVG, the Altar of Lugdunum, decorated with corona civica between laurels and nude male figures; flanked by Victories on columns facing center raising wreaths; $60.00 SALE |PRICE| $54.00


Claudius, 25 January 41 - 13 October 54 A.D.

|Claudius|, |Claudius,| |25| |January| |41| |-| |13| |October| |54| |A.D.|, |as|
Libertas (Latin for Liberty) was the Roman goddess and embodiment of liberty. The pileus liberatis was a soft felt cap worn by liberated slaves of Troy and Asia Minor. In late Republican Rome, the pileus was symbolically given to slaves upon manumission, granting them not only their personal liberty, but also freedom as citizens with the right to vote (if male). Following the assassination of Julius Caesar in 44 B.C., Brutus and his co-conspirators used the pileus to signify the end of Caesar's dictatorship and a return to a Republican system of government. The pileus was adopted as a popular symbol of freedom during the French Revolution and was also depicted on some early U.S. coins.
RB94217. Copper as, RIC I 113, BMCRE I 202, BnF II 230, Hunter I 85, Cohen I 47, SRCV I 1860, aF, bumps, marks, holed and plugged, weight 6.590 g, maximum diameter 28.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 42 A.D.; obverse TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP P P, bare head left; reverse LIBERTAS AVGVSTA, Libertas standing right, pileus (cap worn by freed slaves) in right hand, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field; $36.00 SALE |PRICE| $32.40


Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D.

|Domitian|, |Domitian,| |13| |September| |81| |-| |18| |September| |96| |A.D.|, |denarius|
In 77 or 78 A.D., Gnaeus Julius Agricola was made governor of Roman Britain, a post he occupied until 84. In his first year, Agricola subdued the Ordovices in Wales and pursued the remnants of the tribe to Anglesey, the holy island of the Druids. According to Tacitus, he exterminated the whole tribe. The Ordovices do completely disappear from the historical record, but considering the mountainous terrain, it is unlikely killed the entire population. Another tribe, the Silures, was either also militarily defeated or simply agreed to terms. Tacitus wrote of the Silures: non atrocitate, non clementia mutabatur - the tribe "was changed neither by cruelty nor by clemency." A Roman squadron, sent by Agricola, explored the north of Scotland for the first time, discovering the Orkney and Shetland Islands.Pre-Roman Wales
RS92405. Silver denarius, RIC II-1 Vespasian 921 (C2); RSC II 47; BMCRE II Vespasian 193; BnF III Vespasian 169; SRCV I 2637, F, toned, light marks, obverse slightly off center, minor flan flaws on the reverse, weight 3.067 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, as caesar, early 76 - early 77 A.D.; obverse CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS, laureate head right; reverse COS IIII, Pegasus standing right, archaic curved wing (only near wing showing), raising left foreleg; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $130.00 SALE |PRICE| $117.00


Caligula, 16 March 37 - 24 January 41 A.D., Sidon, Phoenicia

|Roman| |Phoenicia|, |Caligula,| |16| |March| |37| |-| |24| |January| |41| |A.D.,| |Sidon,| |Phoenicia|, |AE| |23|
Zeus was enamored of Europa and decided to seduce or ravish her. He transformed himself into a tame white bull and mixed in with her father's herds. While Europa and her female attendants were gathering flowers, she saw the bull, caressed his flanks, and eventually got onto his back. Zeus took that opportunity and ran to the sea and swam, with her on his back, to the island of Crete. He then revealed his true identity, and Europa became the first queen of Crete. Zeus gave her a necklace made by Hephaestus and three additional gifts: Talos, Laelaps and a javelin that never missed. Zeus later re-created the shape of the white bull in the stars, which is now known as the constellation Taurus.
RP91511. Bronze AE 23, Rouvier 1457 (no star visible); RPC I 4612 (9 spec.); BMC Phoenicia p. 178, 208, gF, grainy and porous, scratches, weight 10.556 g, maximum diameter 22.5 mm, die axis 0o, Sidon (Saida, Lebanon) mint, 37 - 38 A.D.; obverse laureate head right, star lower right (star not visible, RPC notes the star is often faint but likely all originally had a star); reverse veiled Europa seated on bull left, holding bull's horn with right hand, inflated veil billowing overhead in left hand, ΣI∆ΩNOΣ over L HMP (year 148) below; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; $140.00 SALE |PRICE| $126.00


Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D.

|Domitian|, |Domitian,| |13| |September| |81| |-| |18| |September| |96| |A.D.|, |denarius|
In 94 A.D., Domitian rebuilt and rededicated the Curia Julia, the meeting place of the Roman Senate, which had burned down in 64. Construction began in 44 B.C. but was interrupted by Caesar's assassination at the Theatre of Pompey where the Senate had been meeting temporarily while the work was completed. The project was eventually finished by Augustus in 29 B.C. Due to its conversion into the basilica of Sant' Adriano al Foro in the 7th century, the Curia Julia is one of only a handful of Roman structures to survive to today mostly intact. Curia Julia
RS91572. Silver denarius, RIC II-1 763 (C3); RSC II 283; BMCRE II 218; BnF III 193; Hunter I 88, F, old collection toning, tight flan, light scratches, weight 3.147 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 14 Sep 93 - 13 Sep 94 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XIII, laureate head right; reverse IMP XXII COS XVI CENS P P P, Minerva standing left, helmeted and draped, thunderbolt in right hand, spear vertical behind in left hand, grounded shield at feet behind; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection, ex B. A. Seaby Ltd.; $80.00 SALE |PRICE| $72.00


Claudius, 25 January 41 - 13 October 54 A.D., Philippi, Macedonia

|Philippi|, |Claudius,| |25| |January| |41| |-| |13| |October| |54| |A.D.,| |Philippi,| |Macedonia|, |AE| |27|
Philippi was founded by Philip II of Macedonia to control nearby gold mines and the route between Amphipolis and Neapolis. Philip constructed fortifications, sent colonists, and established a mint in the city. In Oct 42 B.C., Mark Antony and Octavian defeated Caesar's assassins, Brutus and Cassius, at the Battle of Philippi west of the city. They released some of their veterans to colonize the city, which was refounded as Colonia Victrix Philippensium. In 30 B.C., Octavian sent more Italian settlers, veterans possibly from the Praetorian Guard. The city was renamed Colonia Iulia Philippensis, and then Colonia Augusta Iulia Philippensis after January, 27 B.C., when Octavian received the title Augustus from the Roman Senate.
RP94065. Bronze AE 27, RPC I 1653, Varbanov III 3774; SNG ANS 684, SNG Cop 3074, BMC Macedonia 24, AMNG III 17, Lindgren 1127, Moushmov 6923, F, overstruck, strong obscuring undertype effects, weight 8.865 g, maximum diameter 26.6 mm, die axis 180o, Philippi (near Filippoi, Greece) mint, 41 - 56 A.D.; obverse TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP, bare head left; reverse COLA VGIVL PHILIP, statues of Augustus to left and Caesar to right on cippus inscribed DIVVS AVG in two lines, altar flanking on each side of cippus; $50.00 SALE |PRICE| $45.00


Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D., Parion, Mysia(?)

|Parium|, |Domitian,| |13| |September| |81| |-| |18| |September| |96| |A.D.,| |Parion,| |Mysia(?)|, |AE| |17|
The attribution of this very rare type to Parium is uncertain. See RPC II p. 137.

The ceremonial founding of a new Roman colony included plowing a furrow, the pomerium, a sacred boundary, around the site of the new city.
RP94085. Bronze AE 17, RPC II Online 889 (12 spec.), SNGvA 6202 (Germa, Galatia), BMC Mysia -, SNG BnF -, SNG Cop -, F, mottled green patina, bumps and scratches, slightly off center, obverse legend not fully struck, weight 4.016 g, maximum diameter 17.1 mm, die axis 0o, Parion, Mysia(?) mint, 13 Sep 81 - 18 Sep 96 A.D.; obverse DOMIT AVG (clockwise from the upper right), laureate head left; reverse priest plowing right with two oxen, marking the pomerium (sacred boundary marked for the foundation of a new Roman colony), GERM in exergue; zero sales of this type recorded on Coin Archives in the last two decades; very rare; $180.00 SALE |PRICE| $162.00


Caligula, 16 March 37 - 24 January 41 A.D.

|Caligula|, |Caligula,| |16| |March| |37| |-| |24| |January| |41| |A.D.|, |sestertius|
This type was the first portrait sestertius struck at the mint of Rome. The wreath on the reverse is the corona civica, the oak wreath awarded to Roman citizens ex senatus consulto (by special decree of the Senate) for saving the life of another citizen by slaying an enemy in battle. It became a prerogative for Roman emperors to be awarded the Civic Crown, originating with Augustus, who was awarded it in 27 B.C. for saving the lives of citizens by ending the series of civil wars.
SH94039. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC I 37, BMCRE I 38, Cohen I 24, BnF II 50, Hunter I 15, SRCV I -, VF, good style portrait, well centered on a tight flan, corrosion, weight 25.093 g, maximum diameter 34.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 37 - 38 A.D.; obverse C CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS PON M TR POT, laureate head left; reverse S P Q R / P P / OB CIVES / SERVATOS (from the Senate and people of Rome to the father of the country for saving the citizens) in four lines within Corona Civica oak wreath; ex Savoca auction 34 (16 Jun 2019), 365; $1800.00 SALE |PRICE| $1620.00











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