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Ancient Coins of Iberia

Celt-Iberian, Bolskan, Iberia, c. 150 - 90 B.C.

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Bolskan (modern Huesca, Spain) was the capital of the Iberian Vescetani tribe, located in Hispania Tarraconensis, about 65 km north of the Ebro River, on the road from Tarraco (modern Tarragona) and Ilerda (modern Lleida) to Caesaraugusta (modern Zaragoza). For six years Bolskan was the capital of Quintus Sertorius, the renegade Roman general and Iberian hero who took control of Spain, defeating all the Roman armies sent to remove him, until he was assassinated in 72 B.C. In 37 B.C., the city was refounded as a Roman colony, Urbs Victrix Osca.
GB92160. Bronze AE 26, Villaronga-Benages 1415 (R3), Alvarez-Burgos 1918, SNG BM 734, SNG Lorichs 814, F, broad flan, corrosion, weight 11.526 g, maximum diameter 26.0 mm, die axis 45o, Bolskan (Huesca, Spain) mint, c. 150 - 90 B.C.; obverse bearded male head right, curly hair, dolphin head down behind; reverse horseman galloping right, couched spear in right hand, reins in left hand, star if five rays around central pellet above, Iberian legend "BoLSCaN" above ground line below; ex CGB Numismatique Paris; $40.00 (€35.20)
 


Celt-Iberian, Bolskan, Iberia, 150 - 100 B.C.

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Bolskan (modern Huesca, Spain) was the capital of the Iberian Vescetani tribe, located in Hispania Tarraconensis, about 65 km north of the Ebro River, on the road from Tarraco (modern Tarragona) and Ilerda (modern Lleida) to Caesaraugusta (modern Zaragoza). For six years Bolskan was the capital of Quintus Sertorius, the renegade Roman general and Iberian hero who took control of Spain, defeating all the Roman armies sent to remove him, until he was assassinated in 72 B.C. In 37 B.C., the city was refounded as a Roman colony, Urbs Victrix Osca.
GB92000. Bronze AE 23, Villaronga-Benages 1415 (R3), Alvarez-Burgos 1918, SNG BM 734, SNG Lorichs 814, F, porous, rough, weight 5.794 g, maximum diameter 23.1 mm, die axis 0o, Bolskan (Huesca, Spain) mint, 150 - 100 B.C.; obverse bearded male head right, curly hair, dotted collar, dolphin head down behind; reverse horseman galloping right, spear in right hand, reins in left, star above, Iberian legend "BoLSCaN" above ground line below; ex FORVM (2010); $30.00 (€26.40)
 


Castulo, Hispania Ulterior, Late 2nd Century B.C.

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After a local princess named Himilce married Hannibal, Castulo allied with Carthage. In 213 B.C., Castulo was the site of Hasdrubal Barca's crushing victory over the Roman army with a force of roughly 40,000 Carthaginian troops plus local Iberian mercenaries. Soon after the Romans made a pact with the residents and the city became a foederati (ally) of Rome.
GB89050. Bronze quadrans, Villaronga-Benages 2152; Villaronga p. 337, 48; SNG BM Spain 1354; SNG Cop 217, Choice F, broad flan, attractive patina, scattered porosity, weight 3.827 g, maximum diameter 17.5 mm, die axis 210o, Castulo (near Linares, Spain) mint, late 2nd century B.C.; obverse diademed male head right; reverse boar standing right on exergue line, star above, "Kastilo" in Iberian script in exergue, linear border; $140.00 (€123.20)
 


Castulo, Hispania Ulterior, Early 1st Century B.C.

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After a local princess named Himilce married Hannibal, Castulo allied with Carthage. In 213 B.C., Castulo was the site of Hasdrubal Barca's crushing victory over the Roman army with a force of roughly 40,000 Carthaginian troops plus local Iberian mercenaries. Soon after the Romans made a pact with the residents and the city became a foederati (ally) of Rome.
GB89037. Bronze semis, Villaronga-Benages 2156 (R6); SNG BM Spain 1359; Villaronga CNH p. 337, 52; Burgos 772; Lindgren II 44; SNG Cop -, aVF, high relief, earthen encrustation, weight 3.791 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 0o, Kastulo mint, early 1st century B.C.; obverse diademed male head right, long pointed nose and chin, Iberian CA right; reverse bull standing right, L and crescent above, "Kastilo" in Iberian script in exergue; ex Ancient Imports (Marc Breitsprecher); $34.00 (€29.92)
 


Castulo, Hispania Ulterior, Mid 2nd Century B.C.

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After a local princess named Himilce married Hannibal, Castulo allied with Carthage. In 213 B.C., Castulo was the site of Hasdrubal Barca's crushing victory over the Roman army with a force of roughly 40,000 Carthaginian troops plus local Iberian mercenaries. Soon after the Romans made a pact with the residents and the city became a foederati (ally) of Rome.
GB89045. Bronze as, Villaronga-Benages 2126, Villaronga 23, SNG BM Spain 1298, Burgos 695, SNG Cop -, aVF, earthen encrustation, scratches, spots of light corrosion, reverse a little off center, weight 18.451 g, maximum diameter 29.1 mm, die axis 90o, Castulo (near Linares, Spain) mint, mid 2nd century B.C.; obverse diademed head right; reverse helmeted sphinx walking right, left foreleg raised, star before, KASTILO in Iberic script below exergue line; ex Rusty Romans; $100.00 (€88.00)
 


Castulo, Hispania Ulterior, Late 2nd Century B.C.

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After a local princess named Himilce married Hannibal, Castulo allied with Carthage. In 213 B.C., Castulo was the site of Hasdrubal Barca's crushing victory over the Roman army with a force of roughly 40,000 Carthaginian troops plus local Iberian mercenaries. Soon after the Romans made a pact with the residents and the city became a foederati (ally) of Rome.
GB89567. Bronze quadrans, Villaronga-Benages 2152; Villaronga p. 337, 48; SNG BM Spain 1354; SNG Cop 217, nice VF, highlighting earthen fill patina, light scratches, weight 3.928 g, maximum diameter 15.6 mm, die axis 0o, Castulo (near Linares, Spain) mint, late 2nd century B.C.; obverse diademed male head right; reverse boar standing right on exergue line, star above, "Kastilo" in Iberian script in exergue, linear border; ex Lusitania Ancient Coins; $200.00 (€176.00)
 


Iberia, Bronze Bar Ingot, 1st Century B.C.

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GA91942. Bronze Bar Ingot, Alvarez-Burgos P35, 12.81g, 2.5mm long; found in Southern Spain, $60.00 (€52.80)
 


Celtic, Ring Money, c. 800 - 100 B.C.

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Ring money of bronze, of silver, and of gold was used by the Celts in trade from Ireland to the Danube region. The dating of Celtic ring money is uncertain. Some authorities date the use of ring money from as early as 800 B.C. and it may have been used as late as 100 B.C. Some believe the bronze rings are actually just strap fittings, not a trade currency. Bronze rings are, however, sometimes found in quite large hoards and, in Spain, they are sometimes found with silver bar and disk ingots, and with 2nd century B.C. denarii of the Roman Republic. Undoubtedly they were used as fittings but they were also undoubtedly used as a store of wealth and for trade.
CE91970. Bronze Ring Money, plain ring, cf. Victoor I - 1b, Alvarez-Burgos P15, VF, weight 7.729 g, maximum diameter 25.3 mm, found in southern Spain; $35.00 (€30.80)
 


Celtic, Ring Money, c. 800 - 100 B.C.

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Ring money of bronze, of silver, and of gold was used by the Celts in trade from Ireland to the Danube region. The dating of Celtic ring money is uncertain. Some authorities date the use of ring money from as early as 800 B.C. and it may have been used as late as 100 B.C. Some believe the bronze rings are actually just strap fittings, not a trade currency. Bronze rings are, however, sometimes found in quite large hoards and, in Spain, they are sometimes found with silver bar and disk ingots, and with 2nd century B.C. denarii of the Roman Republic. Undoubtedly they were used as fittings but they were also undoubtedly used as a store of wealth and for trade.
CE91971. Bronze Ring Money, plain ring, cf. Victoor I - 1b, Alvarez-Burgos P15, VF, weight 5.945 g, maximum diameter 25.5 mm, found in southern Spain; $35.00 (€30.80)
 


Celtic, Ring Money, c. 800 - 100 B.C.

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Ring money of bronze, of silver, and of gold was used by the Celts in trade from Ireland to the Danube region. The dating of Celtic ring money is uncertain. Some authorities date the use of ring money from as early as 800 B.C. and it may have been used as late as 100 B.C. Some believe the bronze rings are actually just strap fittings, not a trade currency. Bronze rings are, however, sometimes found in quite large hoards and, in Spain, they are sometimes found with silver bar and disk ingots, and with 2nd century B.C. denarii of the Roman Republic. Undoubtedly they were used as fittings but they were also undoubtedly used as a store of wealth and for trade.
CE91973. Bronze Ring Money, plain ring, cf. Victoor I - 1b, Alvarez-Burgos P15, VF, weight 5.962 g, maximum diameter 28.0 mm, found in southern Spain; $35.00 (€30.80)
 




  






REFERENCES|

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Catalog current as of Thursday, November 21, 2019.
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Iberia