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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Iberia||View Options:  |  |  |   

Ancient Coins of Iberia
Iberian Celts, Hacksilver, c. 300 - 150 B.C.

|Hacksilver|, |Iberian| |Celts,| |Hacksilver,| |c.| |300| |-| |150| |B.C.||fragment|NEW
Hacksilver or hacksilber, is ancient silver disks, bars, rods, foil, and broken and cut fragments of those forms and also of coins, jewelry or other silver items used as a medium of exchange by weight. It was common in trade beginning at the end of the Iron Age, c. 1200 B.C. in the Levant, and lasted until the first century B.C., were it was used by the Celts and other tribal people in Hispania and Gaul. It was used again in the Middle Ages by the Vikings.
CE98172. Hacksilver fragment, cf. Van Alfen Hacksilber 57, Kim and Kroll 54, Garcia-Bellido 393, larger than most specimens we have handled, cut marks, casting bubbles, 38.3 mm, 34.53 g, weight 34.530 g, maximum diameter 38.3 mm, die axis 0o, c. 300 - 150 B.C.; $300.00 (€246.00)
 


Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D., Carthago Nova, Hispania Tarraconensis

|Hispania|, |Augustus,| |16| |January| |27| |B.C.| |-| |19| |August| |14| |A.D.,| |Carthago| |Nova,| |Hispania| |Tarraconensis||provincial| |as|NEW
Cartagena, Spain was originally named Mastia. Possessing one of the best harbors in the Western Mediterranean, it was re-founded by the Carthaginian general Hasdrubal in 228 B.C. as Qart Hadasht ("New City"), identically named to Carthage, for the purpose of serving as a stepping-off point for the conquest of Spain. The Roman general Scipio Africanus conquered it in 209 B.C. and renamed it Carthago Nova (literally, New New City). Julius Caesar gave the town Latin Rights, and Octavian renamed it in his honor as the colony Colonia Victrix Iulia Nova Carthago or Colonia Vrbs Iulia Nova Carthago (C.V.I.N.C.) depending on the source. During the Roman period, it was the site of major silver mines, yielding revenue of 25,000 drachmae daily. It was known also for the production of garum, a fermented fish sauce. In 298 A.D. Diocletian constituted a new Roman province in Hispania called Carthaginensis and settled the capital in this city. It remained important until it was destroyed by the Vandals in 435 A.D.
RP96889. Bronze provincial as, Villaronga-Benages 3137, Alvarez-Burgos 577, SNG Cop 510, RPC Online I 167, aF, weight 13.350 g, maximum diameter 27.8 mm, die axis 0o, Carthago Nova (Cartagena, Spain) mint, obverse AVGVSTVS DIVI F, laureate head right; reverse C VAR RVF SEX IVL POL II VIR Q (C. Varius Rufus and Sex. Iulius Pol(lio?), duoviri quinquennalis), priest's implements: simpulum (ladle), aspergillum (sprinkler), securis (sacrificial ax), and apex (priest's hat); $60.00 (€49.20)
 


Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D., Julia Traducta, Hispania Baetica

|Roman| |Hispania|, |Augustus,| |16| |January| |27| |B.C.| |-| |19| |August| |14| |A.D.,| |Julia| |Traducta,| |Hispania| |Baetica||provincial| |as|NEW
Julia Traducta, in the Algeciras Bay, on the Mediterranean coast of Hispania Baetica, only struck coins during the reign of Augustus. It is not possible to precisely date this type but it may have been struck when Augustus visited the region in 15 - 14 B.C. Octavian-Augustus founded Julia Traducta by moving part of the population of Zilis, in North Africa, and settling them there alongside his veterans. His purpose was to establish a stronghold of his supporters in an area that had overwhelmingly supported Pompey during the Civil War.
RP96857. Bronze provincial as, Villaronga-Benages 3352, RPC I 108, Burgos 1760, SNG Cop 459, SNG Milan 396, VF, dark green patina, obv. off center, light earthen deposits, areas of slightest porosity, edge crack, weight 8.603 g, maximum diameter 25.6 mm, die axis 300o, Julia Traducta (Algeciras, Andalucia, Spain) mint, 15 - 14 B.C.(?); obverse PERM CAES AVG, bare head left; reverse IVLIA / TRAD in two lines within oak wreath; $110.00 (€90.20)
 


Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D., Colonia Patricia, Hispania Baetica

|Roman| |Hispania|, |Augustus,| |16| |January| |27| |B.C.| |-| |19| |August| |14| |A.D.,| |Colonia| |Patricia,| |Hispania| |Baetica||provincial| |dupondius|NEW
This type was probably struck for Augusts' visit to Colonia Patricia, c. 15 - 14 B.C.
RP98533. Bronze provincial dupondius, Villaronga-Benages 3356, Burgos 1988, RPC I 128, SNG Cop 464, F, dark green patina, a little off center, bumps and marks, scattered corrosion, earthen deposits, weight 22.268 g, maximum diameter 33.3 mm, die axis 270o, Colonia Patricia (Cordoba, Spain) mint, 19 - 2 B.C.; obverse PERMISSV CAESARIS AVGVSTI, bare head right; reverse COLONIA PATRICIA, aquila between two signa; $150.00 (€123.00)
 


Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D., Colonia Patricia, Hispania Baetica

|Roman| |Hispania|, |Augustus,| |16| |January| |27| |B.C.| |-| |19| |August| |14| |A.D.,| |Colonia| |Patricia,| |Hispania| |Baetica||provincial| |as|
Cordova, a city in Andalusia was the first colony planted by the Romans in Spain. Its original name was Corduba. When it was made a Roman colony it was renamed Colonia Patricia, to honor the veterans and worthy men who settled it, to whom honor was due, as to Fathers (Patribus).
RP96868. Bronze provincial as, Villaronga-Benages 3357, RPC I 129, Ripollès 129, SNG Lorichs 1378, SNG Tübingen 93, F, nice dark green patina, tight flan, struck with worn/damaged dies, obverse edge beveled, weight 9.434 g, maximum diameter 26.0 mm, die axis 315o, Colonia Patricia (Cordoba, Spain) mint, 19 - 2 B.C.; obverse PERM CAES AVG, bare head of Augustus to left; reverse COLONIA / PATRICIA in two lines within oak wreath; ex Trusted Coins; $80.00 (€65.60)
 


Hispania, 2nd to 1st century B.C., Lot of 7 Bronze Coins

|Multiple| |Coin| |Lots|, |Hispania,| |2nd| |to| |1st| |century| |B.C.,| |Lot| |of| |7| |Bronze| |Coins
||Lot|
Consignor's list, not verified by FORVM but believed to be accurate:
1) Ulia, Spain, AE as, Villaronga-Benages 2119.
2) Cordoba, Spain, AE quadrans, Villaronga-Benages 2484.
3) Castulo, Spain, AE semis, Villaronga-Benages 2119.
4) Gades, Spain, AE unit, Villaronga-Benages 666.
5) Belikio, Spain, AE as, Villaronga-Benages 1433.
6) Castulo, Spain, AE semis, Villaronga-Benages 2119.
7) Obulco, Spain, AE semis, Villaronga-Benages 2262.
LT98635. Bronze Lot, Lot 7 bronze coins from ancient Hispania, F to VF, 19.1mm - 32.4mm, 2nd to 1st century B.C.; the actual coins in the photograph; no tags or flips; as-is, no returns; $250.00 (€205.00)
 


Iberia, Hackgold and Hacksilver, c. 300 - 150 B.C.

|Iberia|, |Iberia,| |Hackgold| |and| |Hacksilver,| |c.| |300| |-| |150| |B.C.||Lot|
 
GA98193. Mixed Lot, See Maria Paz Garcia-Bellido (2011), "Hackgold and Hacksilber in protomonetary Iberia", one piece of gold hackgold (3.184) and two pieces of hacksilver (2.483g and 1.790g), all found in Spain, three pieces in lot; $650.00 (€533.00)
 


Celtic, Ring Money, Lot of 27 Small Rings, c. 800 - 100 B.C.

|Ring| |Money|, |Celtic,| |Ring| |Money,| |Lot| |of| |27| |Small| |Rings,| |c.| |800| |-| |100| |B.C.||Ring| |Money|
Ring money of bronze, of silver, and of gold was used by the Celts in trade from Ireland to the Danube region. The dating of Celtic ring money is uncertain. Some authorities date the use of ring money from as early as 800 B.C. and it may have been used as late as 100 B.C. Some believe the bronze rings are actually just strap fittings, not a trade currency. Bronze rings are, however, sometimes found in quite large hoards and, in Spain, they are sometimes found with silver bar and disk ingots, and with 2nd century B.C. denarii of the Roman Republic. Undoubtedly they were used as fittings but they were also undoubtedly used as a store of wealth and for trade.
LT96278. Bronze Ring Money, 27 plain small rings, cf. Victoor I - 1b, Alvarez-Burgos P15; 19.3 - 28.0mm diameter, the actual rings in the photograph, lot of 27; $200.00 (€164.00)
 


Iberian Celts, Hacksilver, c. 300 - 150 B.C.

|Hacksilver|, |Iberian| |Celts,| |Hacksilver,| |c.| |300| |-| |150| |B.C.||fragment|
Hacksilver or hacksilber, is ancient silver disks, bars, rods, foil, and broken and cut fragments of those forms and also of coins, jewelry or other silver items used as a medium of exchange by weight. It was common in trade beginning at the end of the Iron Age, c. 1200 B.C. in the Levant, and lasted until the first century B.C., were it was used by the Celts and other tribal people in Hispania and Gaul. It was used again in the Middle Ages by the Vikings.
CE97576. Hacksilver fragment, cf. Kim and Kroll 55; Garcia-Bellido 393, fragment broken and cut from a bar or disk ingot, 9.199g, 21.2mm long, $110.00 (€90.20)
 


Iberian Celts, Hacksilver, c. 300 - 150 B.C.

|Hacksilver|, |Iberian| |Celts,| |Hacksilver,| |c.| |300| |-| |150| |B.C.||fragment|
Hacksilver or hacksilber, is ancient silver disks, bars, rods, foil, and broken and cut fragments of those forms and also of coins, jewelry or other silver items used as a medium of exchange by weight. It was common in trade beginning at the end of the Iron Age, c. 1200 B.C. in the Levant, and lasted until the first century B.C., were it was used by the Celts and other tribal people in Hispania and Gaul. It was used again in the Middle Ages by the Vikings.
CE97577. Hacksilver fragment, cf. Van Alfen Hacksilber 57, Kim and Kroll 54, Garcia-Bellido 393, irregular shape with many casting bubbles, 8.713g, 28.0mm, $100.00 (€82.00)
 




  






REFERENCES|

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