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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Anatolia| ▸ |Lycaonia||View Options:  |  |  | 

Lycaonia

Lycaonia was a large region in the interior of Anatolia, north of Mount Taurus, bounded on the east by Cappadocia, on the north by Galatia, on the west by Phrygia and Pisidia, and on the south by Cilicia and in the Byzantine period Isauria; but its boundaries varied greatly at different times. The Lycaonians appear to have been in early times to a great extent independent of the Persian empire, and were like their neighbors the Isaurians a wild and lawless race of freebooters; but their country was traversed by one of the great natural lines of high road through Asia Minor, from Sardis and Ephesus to the Cilician gates, and a few considerable towns grew up along or near this line. After the defeat of Antiochus the Great, Lycaonia was given by the Romans to King Eumenes II of Pergamon. About 160 BC, part of Lycaonia was added to Galatia; and in 129 BC the eastern half was given to Cappadocia. Its administration and grouping changed often under the Romans. In Acts 14:6 Paul, after leaving Iconium, crossed the frontier and came to Lystra in Lycaonia. The mention of the Lycaonian language in the Acts of the Apostles (14:11) shows that the native language was spoken by the common people at Lystra even in 50 A.D.; and probably it was only later and under Christian influence that Greek took its place. In 371, Lycaonia was first formed into a separate Roman province. The ancient coinage of Lycaonia is quite limited. Judging from the number of types and known issues, coins appear to have been struck sporadically and perhaps mostly for prestige or important occasions.

Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D., Iconium, Lycaonia

|Lycaonia|, |Antoninus| |Pius,| |August| |138| |-| |7| |March| |161| |A.D.,| |Iconium,| |Lycaonia||AE| |17|
Iconium, Lycaonia, is modern Konya, Turkey.

Lycaonia was bounded on the west by Pisidia, on the north by Galatia, on the east by Cappadocia, and on the south by the mountainous country of Isauria or Cilicia Tracheia.
RP97770. Bronze AE 17, RPC Online IV.3 T7259; vA Lykao 308; SNGvA 8648; SNG Hunterian I 2150; BMC Lycaonia p. 5, 7; Imhoof-Blumer KM p. 418, 7, VF, green patina, centered on a tight flan, porosity, scattered pits, edge flaw, weight 3.931 g, maximum diameter 19.3 mm, die axis 180o, Iconium (Konya, Turkey) mint, Aug 138 - 7 Mar 161 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS AVG PIVS, laureate and draped bust right; reverse COL ICO, helmeted head of Athena right; $60.00 (60.60)


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D., Claudiolaodicea Combusta, Lycaonia

|Lycaonia|, |Vespasian,| |1| |July| |69| |-| |24| |June| |79| |A.D.,| |Claudiolaodicea| |Combusta,| |Lycaonia||AE| |25|
Claudiolaodicea, founded by Seleucus I Nicator, was one of five cities he named after his mother Laodice. Restored by Claudius in the 1st century A.D., it was renamed Claudiolaodicea in his honor. Its Latin epithet Combusta indicates it was once destroyed by fire. Located northwest of Iconium (now Konya), on the high road from the west coast to Melitene on the Euphrates, it is now Ladik, Konya Province, Turkey. Some ancient authors describe it as located in Lycaonia, others in Pisidia, and Ptolemy places it in Galatia. This discrepancy is easily explained because these territories were often extended or reduced and the city was likely in each of them at one time. The few imperial coins of Claudiolaodicea all belong to the reigns of Titus and Domitian.
RP91181. Bronze AE 25, RPC Online II 1612 (19 spec.), vA Lykien 141, SNG BnF 2320, SNGvA 5399, Lindgren-Kovacs 1384, Waddington 4778, VF, dark green patina, bumps and marks, reverse a little off center, weight 9.779 g, maximum diameter 25.1 mm, die axis 0o, Laodicea Catacecaumene (Ladik, Turkey) mint, 71 A.D.; obverse AYTOKPATWP KAICAP OYECΠACIANOC, laureate head right; reverse CEBACTH NEIKH KΛAY∆IOΛAO∆IKEWN, Nike standing slightly left, head left, wreath in extended right hand, palm frond in left hand; scarce; SOLD


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D., Lystra, Lycaonia

|Lycaonia|, |Antoninus| |Pius,| |August| |138| |-| |7| |March| |161| |A.D.,| |Lystra,| |Lycaonia||AE| |23|
Lystra, mentioned six times in the New Testament, was on an ancient road from Ephesus, to Sardis, to Antioch in Pisidia, to Iconium, to Lystra, to Derbe, through the Cilician Gates, to Tarsus, to Antioch in Syria, and then to points east and south. The city was visited several times by the Paul the Apostle, along with Barnabas or Silas. There Paul met a young disciple, Timothy. The site of Lystra is believed to be located 30 kilometres south of the city of Konya (Iconium in the New Testament), north of the village of Hatunsaray. A small museum within the village of Hatunsaray displays artifacts from ancient Lystra.
RP97243. Bronze AE 23, RPC Online IV.3 7263 (7 spec.); SNG Righetti 1465; vA Lystra p. 516; vA Lycaoniens -, SNGvA -; SNG BnF -; BMC Lycaonia -; SNG Cop -, SNG Hunterian -, VF, attractive dark green paint, earthen deposits, tight flan cutting off part of legends, weight 7.914 g, maximum diameter 23.4 mm, die axis 0o, Lystra mint, Aug 138 - 7 Mar 161 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P COS IIII, laureate head right; reverse MINERVAE COL LVSTRA, Athena standing, facing, head left, wearing Corinthian helmet, holding patera over lighted altar and spear, shield at feet right; ex Leu Numismatik web auction 13 (15 Aug 2020), lot 910; rare, and rare city; SOLD










REFERENCES

Babelon, E. La collection Waddington au cabinet des mdailles. (Paris, 1898).
Gktrk, M.T. "Small coins from Cilicia and surroundings" in MIMAA.
Hill, G.F. A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Greek Coins of Lycaonia, Isauria, and Cilicia. (London, 1900).
Hoover, O. Handbook of Coins of Northern and Central Anatolia, Pontos, Paphlagonia, Bithynia, Phrygia, Galatia, Lykaonia, and Kappadokia...Fifth to First Centuries BC. HGC 7. (Lancaster, PA, 2012).
Imhoof-Blumer, F. Kleinasiatische Mnzen. (Vienna, 1901-2).
Lindgren, H. & F. Kovacs. Ancient Bronze Coins of Asia Minor and the Levant. (San Mateo, 1985).
Lindgren, H. Lindgren III: Ancient Greek Bronze Coins. (Quarryville, 1993).
RPC Online - http://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Vol. 2: Asia and Africa. (London, 1979).
Sear, D. Greek Imperial Coins and Their Values. (London, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 6: Phrygia to Cilicia. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Sammlung Hans Von Aulock, Vol. 3: Pisidia, Lycaonia, Cilicia, Galatia, etc. (Berlin, 1964).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, France, Cabinet des Mdailles, Bibliothque Nationale, Vol. 3: Pamphylia, Pisidia, Lycaonia, Galatia. (Paris, 1994).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Switzerland I, Levante-Cilicia. (Zurich,1986).
Troxell, H. A. & J. H. Kagin. ?Cilicians and Neighbors in Miniature? in Kraay-Mrkholm Essays.
von Aulock, H., ed. Mnzen und Stdte Lycaoniens. (Tbingen, 1976).

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