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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |Roman Provincial| ▸ |Roman Syria||View Options:  |  |  |   

Roman Provincial Coins of Syria

In 63 B.C., Syria was incorporated into the Roman Republic as a province following the success of Pompey the Great against the Parthians. In 135 A.D., after the defeat of the Bar Kokhba Revolt, Roman Syria and Judaea were merged into the province Syria Palaestina. The province Coele-Syria was split from Syria Palaestina in 193. Syria became part of the splinter Palmyrene Empire for a brief period from 260 to 272, when it was restored to Roman central authority. In the 3rd century, with the Severan dynasty, Syrians even achieved imperial power.

Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Seleucia, Seleucia Pieria, Syria

|Roman| |Syria|, |Trajan,| |25| |January| |98| |-| |8| |or| |9| |August| |117| |A.D.,| |Seleucia,| |Seleucia| |Pieria,| |Syria||AE| |20|NEW
One of the rare examples of ancient coinage showing a three-dimensional view with somewhat accurate perspective. The sacred stone enshrined on this coin was probably a meteorite.
RP97250. Bronze AE 20, RPC Online III 3770 (3 spec.); Butcher CRS 420/54b; SNG Hunterian II 2728; SNG Cop 403; cf. BMC Galatia p. 274, 38 (larger denomination), VF, dark green patina with highlighting earthen deposits, well centered, small edge splits, weight 5.390 g, maximum diameter 19.7 mm, die axis 0o, Seleucia (Cevlik, Hatay Province, Turkey) mint, 25 Jan 98 - 8/9 Aug 117 A.D.; obverse AYTOK KAIΣ NEP TPAIANOC APIΣT ΓEPM ∆AK, laureate head right; reverse CELEYKEΩN ΠEIEΠIAC, sacred stone of Zeus Kaisos draped with ribbon, in shrine with four columns supporting a pyramidal roof surmounted by an eagle, SEYC / KACIOC in two lines in exergue, Γ lower right; ex Leu Numismatik web auction 12 (31 May, 2020), part of lot 2018; $110.00 SALE |PRICE| $99.00
 


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Chalcis ad Belum, Chalcidice, Syria

|Roman| |Syria|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.,| |Chalcis| |ad| |Belum,| |Chalcidice,| |Syria||AE| |21|NEW
Trajan's last coinage struck at Chalcis ad Belum used the same reverse, dated KE. Year 25 of the local era must have been Autumn 116 - Autumn 117 A.D.; thus the era of the city began in Autumn 92 A.D. The KE reverse was used for Hadrian's coinage only for the short time after the mint learned he was the new emperor until the local New Year's day (perhaps 29 August). When the New Year began the date was changed to B referring to Hadrian's second regnal year (a new regnal year began on New Year's day, not the one year anniversary of rule).
RP97251. Bronze AE 21, RPC III 3471A (1 spec., added post publication); Butcher CRS p. 437, 15 var. (obv. leg.); SNG Hunterian II 2711 var. (same, slight drapery), VF, near black patina with red earthen highlighting, tight flan, marks, edge a little ragged, weight 9.023 g, maximum diameter 21.2 mm, die axis 0o, Chalcis ad Belum (Qinnasrin, Syria) mint, Autumn 119 - Autumn 120 A.D.; obverse AYT KAIC Θ TPA YI Θ NEP YI - A∆PIANOC CEB, laureate and draped bust right; reverse ΦΛ XAΛ/KI∆EWN / ∆ (Flavius Chalkis [year] 4) in three lines, all within laurel wreath of eight bunches of leaves, closed at the top with a jewel; ex Leu Numismatik web auction 12 (31 May, 2020), part of lot 2018; very rare; $120.00 SALE |PRICE| $108.00
 


Trajan Decius, September 249 - June or July 251 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria

|Antioch|, |Trajan| |Decius,| |September| |249| |-| |June| |or| |July| |251| |A.D.,| |Antioch,| |Seleucis| |and| |Pieria,| |Syria||tetradrachm|NEW
In 256 A.D., about six years after this coin was struck, the Persian King Shapur conquered and plundered Antioch.
RY94930. Billon tetradrachm, McAlee 1120(b) (rare); Prieur 538 (10 spec.); Dura Coins 494; RPC Online IX 1634 (6 spec.); BMC Galatia p. 220, 580, VF, full border centering, flow lines, minor encrustation, uneven toning, slight porosity, weight 11.412 g, maximum diameter 26.9 mm, die axis 225o, 2nd officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, Sep 249 - Jun/Jul 251 A.D.; obverse AVT K Γ ME KY ∆EKIOC TPAIANOC CEB, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind, •• below bust; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞOYCIAC (holder of Tribunitian power), eagle standing left on palm branch, head left, wings spread, wreath in beak, S C (senatus consulto) in exergue; from the Ray Nouri Collection; scarce; $110.00 SALE |PRICE| $99.00 ON RESERVE


Philip II, July or August 247 - Late 249 A.D., Antioch, Seleukis and Pieria, Syria

|Antioch|, |Philip| |II,| |July| |or| |August| |247| |-| |Late| |249| |A.D.,| |Antioch,| |Seleukis| |and| |Pieria,| |Syria||tetradrachm|NEW
The ruins of Antioch on the Orontes lie near the modern city of Antakya, Turkey. Founded near the end of the 4th century B.C. by Seleucus I Nicator, one of Alexander the Great's generals, Antioch's geographic, military and economic location, particularly the spice trade, the Silk Road, the Persian Royal Road, benefited its occupants, and eventually it rivaled Alexandria as the chief city of the Near East and as the main center of Hellenistic Judaism at the end of the Second Temple period. Antioch is called "the cradle of Christianity," for the pivotal early role it played in the emergence of the faith. It was one of the four cities of the Syrian tetrapolis. Its residents are known as Antiochenes. Once a great metropolis of half a million people, it declined to insignificance during the Middle Ages because of warfare, repeated earthquakes and a change in trade routes following the Mongol conquests, which then no longer passed through Antioch from the far east.6th Century Antioch
RY94953. Billon tetradrachm, McAlee 1043; RPC Online VIII U28990; Prieur 473; BMC Galatia p. 218, 559; SNG Cop 268; SNG Fitzwilliam 5912; SNG Hunterian II 3073, VF, lightly toned, porous, slight doubling of the reverse legend, small areas of corrosion on edge, weight 10.438 g, maximum diameter 28.3 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 248 A.D.; obverse AVTOK K M IOVΛI ΦIΛIΠΠOC CEB, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞOYCIAC YΠA TO ∆ (holder of Tribunitian power, consul for the 4th time), eagle standing left, wings open, head left, wreath in beak, ANTIOXIA over S C (senatus consulto) in exergue; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $90.00 SALE |PRICE| $81.00
 


Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria

|Antioch|, |Philip| |I| |the| |Arab,| |February| |244| |-| |End| |of| |September| |249| |A.D.,| |Antioch,| |Seleucis| |and| |Pieria,| |Syria||tetradrachm|NEW
When Philip visited Antioch, Saint Babylas refused to let him enter the gathering of Christians at the Easter vigil (Eusebius, Historia ecclesiastica, VI, 34). Later legend elaborates, stating that Babylas demanded that he do penance for his part in the murder of the young Gordian III before he would allow Philip to celebrate Easter. Saint Babylas died in prison in 253 during the Decian persecution. He asked to be buried in his chains.
RY94954. Billon tetradrachm, Prieur 319; RPC Online VIII U29183; McAlee 887; BMC Galatia p. 212, 506; Dura Coins 397, F, dark toning, light earthen deposits, strike a bit flat with parts of legends weak, slightly off center, weight 9.455 g, maximum diameter 26.7 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 244 A.D.; obverse AVTOK K M IOVΛI ΦIΛIΠΠOC CEB, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞOYCIAC (holder of Tribunitian power), eagle standing facing on palm branch, head left, tail left, wings open, wreath in beak, S C (senatus consulto) in exergue; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $120.00 SALE |PRICE| $108.00
 


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Samosata, Commagene, Syria

|Samosata|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.,| |Samosata,| |Commagene,| |Syria||AE| |19|NEW
Samosata, meaning "sun," was an ancient city whose ruins existed at the modern city of Samsat, Adiyaman Province, Turkey until the site was flooded by the Atatürk Dam. -- wikipedia.org
RY94959. Bronze AE 19, cf. RPC III 3419; SNG Munchen XXVIII 373 ff.; BMC Galatia p. 118, 20 ff., VF, attractive portrait, nice dark green patina with highlighting earthen deposits, tight flan cutting off right side of obv. legend, reverse off center, weight 4.345 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 0o, Samosata (site now flooded by the Atatürk Dam) mint, 11 Aug 117 - 10 Jul 138 A.D.; obverse A∆PIANOC CEBACTOC (or similar with date at end of legend), laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from rear; reverse ΦΛA / CAMO / MHTPO / KOM (Flavia Samosata Metropolis Commagene), inscription in four lines within oak wreath, pellet in annulet at top; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $100.00 SALE |PRICE| $90.00
 


Severus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D., Antioch, Seleukis and Pieria

|Antioch|, |Severus| |Alexander,| |13| |March| |222| |-| |March| |235| |A.D.,| |Antioch,| |Seleukis| |and| |Pieria||8| |assaria|NEW
The Tyche of Antioch was a cult statue of the city goddess (fortune) of Antioch, venerated in a temple called the Tychaion. The statue was made by Eutychides of Sicyon (c. 335 - c. 275), a pupil of the great Lysippus. It was the best-known piece of Seleucid art, remarkable because it was sculpted to be viewed from all directions, unlike many statues from the period. Although the original has been lost, many copies exist, including the one in the photograph right, now at the Vatican. The goddess is seated on a rock (Mount Sipylus), has her right foot on a swimming figure (the river Orontes), wears a mural crown (the city's walls), and has grain in her right hand (the city's fertility).Tyche of Antioch
RY94894. Bronze 8 assaria, SNG Hunt 3042 (same obv. die); McAlee 832/2 (same); Butcher 488a; SNG Cop 256 var. (SHC in ex.); BMC Galatia, p. 209, 479 var. (same), aF, attractive for the grade, dark brown toning with green and red earthen highlighting deposits, porosity, weight 17.391 g, maximum diameter 32.2 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 13 Mar 222 - Mar 235 A.D.; obverse AVT KAI MAP AVP CE AΛEΞAN∆POC CEB, laureate head right; reverse ANTIOXEΩN MHTPO KOΛΩNIAC, Tyche seated left on rocks between standing Tyche, on left, holding rudder and cornucopia, and figure in military dress, on right, crowning the seated Tyche, tiny ∆-E (∆ EΠAPXEIΩN - of the four eparchies) high across field, river god Orontes swimming left between S C (senatus consulto) in exergue; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $90.00 SALE |PRICE| $81.00
 


Herennius Etruscus, Early 251 - First Half of June 251 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria

|Antioch|, |Herennius| |Etruscus,| |Early| |251| |-| |First| |Half| |of| |June| |251| |A.D.,| |Antioch,| |Seleucis| |and| |Pieria,| |Syria||tetradrachm|NEW
In 250 the Plague of Cyprian, a pandemic probably smallpox, began. It was still raging in 270 when it claimed the life of emperor Claudius II Gothicus. At the height of the outbreak, 5,000 people a day were said to be dying in Rome. The plague caused widespread manpower shortages in agriculture and the Roman army.
RY97763. Billon tetradrachm, McAlee 1153b (scarce), RPC Online IX 1715 (11 spec.), Prieur 630, Dura Coins 552, BMC Galatia 614 var. (5th officina), VF, slightly rough, weight 12.615 g, maximum diameter 25.3 mm, die axis 0o, 2nd officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, as caesar, 250 - early 251; obverse EPENN ETPOV ME KV ∆EKIOC KECAP, bare-headed, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind, two dots (2nd officina) below; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞOYCIAC (holder of Tribunitian power), eagle standing left on palm frond, wings open, head right, tail left, wreath in beak, S C (senatus consulto) in exergue; scarce; $110.00 SALE |PRICE| $99.00
 


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Struck in Rome for use in Syria

|Trajan|, |Trajan,| |25| |January| |98| |-| |8| |or| |9| |August| |117| |A.D.,| |Struck| |in| |Rome| |for| |use| |in| |Syria||chalkous|NEW
In 116 A.D., Trajan made Syria a Roman province. The orichalcum coinage of 116 A.D., which included this coin, was struck in Rome and shipped to Antioch.
RY96780. Bronze chalkous, Woytek 939v (11 spec.), McAlee 526 (rare), RPC III 3681, BMCRE III 1075, Strack 496, gVF, thick earthen deposits, weight 0.748 g, maximum diameter 11.9 mm, die axis 225o, Rome mint, c. 116 A.D.; obverse laureate and draped bust right; reverse large S•C in wreath; a little gem; rare; $120.00 SALE |PRICE| $108.00
 


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D., Laodicea ad Mare, Syria, Julia Domna Reverse

|Decapolis,| |Arabia| |&| |Syria|, |Septimius| |Severus,| |9| |April| |193| |-| |4| |February| |211| |A.D.,| |Laodicea| |ad| |Mare,| |Syria,| |Julia| |Domna| |Reverse||diassarion|NEW
During the reign of Commodus, in 179 A.D., Lucius Septimius Severus was put in command of Legio IV Scythica stationed at Antioch. In Syria, he was introduced to a little girl, Julia Domna, aged nine, the daughter of the high priest of Emesa, Julius Bassianus. Whoever marries this child, the astrologers had predicted, she will make into a king. Severus was devoted to astrology, and both the girl and the fable fascinated him. They married in 187 A.D., when she was 17.
RY93391. Bronze diassarion, BMC Galatia, p. 258, 81 - 82; SNG Hunterian 3211 - 3212; Meyer 23 – 34; c/m: Howgego 586 (COL) and 581 (CAΓ), aF, well centered, rough, weight 10.553 g, maximum diameter 25.2 mm, die axis 45o, Laodicea ad Mare (Latakia, Syria) mint, 194 - 197 A.D.; obverse AVT KAI CEPT CEOYHPOC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust of Septimius Severus right, countermarks: COL in a rectangular punch, and probably CAΓ (AΓ ligate) in a rectangular punch; reverse AYΓ ∆OMNA TYXH MHTPOΠOΛEΩC, draped bust of Julia Domna right within distyle shrine; from the Errett Bishop Collection; rare; $70.00 SALE |PRICE| $63.00
 




  






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