Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  STORE WIDE SALE!!! 10% OFF EVERYTHING!!! WE ARE OPEN AND SHIPPING!!! We Are Working From Home, Social Distancing, Wearing Masks, And Sanitizing To Pack Orders!!! Please Call Us If You Have Questions 252-646-1958 Expert Authentication - Accurate Descriptions - Reasonable Prices - Coins From Under $10 To Museum Quality Rarities STORE WIDE SALE!!! 10% OFF EVERYTHING!!! WE ARE OPEN AND SHIPPING!!! We Are Working From Home, Social Distancing, Wearing Masks, And Sanitizing To Pack Orders!!! Please Call Us If You Have Questions 252-646-1958 Explore Our Website And Find Joy In The History, Numismatics, Art, Mythology, And Geography Of Coins!!!

× Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Recent Additions

Oct 21, 2020

Oct 20, 2020

Oct 19, 2020

Oct 18, 2020

Oct 17, 2020

Oct 16, 2020

Oct 15, 2020

Oct 14, 2020

Oct 13, 2020
Asian Coins

Oct 12, 2020

Oct 11, 2020

Oct 10, 2020

Oct 09, 2020
Asian Coins

Oct 08, 2020

Oct 07, 2020

Oct 06, 2020

Oct 05, 2020

Oct 04, 2020
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Medieval & Modern Coins| ▸ |United Kingdom||View Options:  |  |  | 

Coins of the United Kingdom
Great Britain, George IV, 29 January 1820 - 26 June 1830

|United| |Kingdom|, |Great| |Britain,| |George| |IV,| |29| |January| |1820| |-| |26| |June| |1830||farthing|NEW
From 1811 until his accession, George IV served as regent during his father's mental illness. He forbade his wife from attending his coronation and unsuccessfully attempted to divorce her, which brought the contempt of the people. For most of George's regency and reign, Prime Minister Lord Liverpool controlled the government with little help from George. George's extravagant lifestyle and wasteful spending angered taxpayers at a time when Britain was fighting the Napoleonic Wars. He did not provide leadership in a time of crisis, nor did he act as a role model for his people. Liverpool led Britain's ultimate victory, negotiated the peace settlement, and attempted to deal with the social and economic malaise that followed. George IV was succeeded by his younger brother William.
UK94088. Copper farthing, Peck 1414, SCBC 3822, AU, areas of light porosity on reverse, light marks, weight 4.961 g, maximum diameter 21.1 mm, die axis 180o, London mint, 1825, high 2, low 5; obverse GEORGIUS IV DE GRATIA (George IV, by the grace of God), laureate and draped bust left; reverse BRITANNIAR: REX FID: DEF: (King of The British territories, Defender of the Faith), Britannia seated right, arm on shield, holding laurel branch and trident, date below; ex D.B. Bailey Collection; $125.00 SALE |PRICE| $107.00
 


Great Britain, William IV, 26 June 1830 - 20 June 1837

|United| |Kingdom|, |Great| |Britain,| |William| |IV,| |26| |June| |1830| |-| |20| |June| |1837||half| |crown|NEW
William IV was the third son of George III and younger brother and successor to George IV, he was the last king and penultimate monarch of Britain's House of Hanover. He was nicknamed the "Sailor King" because he served in the Royal Navy in his youth. He served in North America and the Caribbean. Since his two older brothers died without leaving legitimate issue, he inherited the throne at 64 years old. His reign saw reforms: the poor law was updated, child labor restricted, slavery abolished in nearly all the Empire, and the electoral system was reformed. Although William did not engage in politics as much as his brother or his father, he was the last monarch to appoint a prime minister contrary to the will of Parliament. He granted his German kingdom a short-lived liberal constitution. At the time of his death, William had no surviving legitimate children, but he was survived by eight of the ten illegitimate children he had by the actress Dorothea Jordan, with whom he cohabited for twenty years. William was succeeded in the United Kingdom by his niece, Victoria, and in Hanover by his brother, Ernest Augustus.
UK94089. Silver half crown, SCBC 3834, gVF, light marks, reeded edge, weight 13.915 g, maximum diameter 32.1 mm, die axis 180o, London mint, 1836; obverse GULIELMUS IIII D: G: BRITANNIAR: REX F: D: (William IV, by the grace of God, King of the British territories, Defender of the Faith), bare head right, W.W. script (William Wyon, engraver) on base of neck truncation; reverse quartered shield of arms (harp and lions) with an escutcheon of the Arms of Hanover at center, Order of the Garter draped below, all on a crowned ermine mantle, small figure of St. George slaying the dragon between ANNO and 1836 below; $160.00 SALE |PRICE| $144.00
 


Great Britain, Victoria, 20 June 1837 - 22 January 1901

|United| |Kingdom|, |Great| |Britain,| |Victoria,| |20| |June| |1837| |-| |22| |January| |1901
||penny|NEW
Queen Victoria inherited the throne at 18, after her father's three elder brothers had all died, leaving no legitimate surviving children. The UK was already a constitutional monarchy, in which the Sovereign held relatively little direct political power. Privately, Victoria attempted to influence government policy and ministerial appointments. Publicly, she became a national icon and was identified with strict standards of personal morality. Her reign of 63 years and seven months is known as the Victorian era.
UK94022. Copper penny, SCBC 3948, AU, light marks and rim bumps, weight 19.042 g, maximum diameter 34.1 mm, die axis 0o, London mint, 1854; obverse VICTORIA DEI GRATIA (Victoria, by the Grace of God), first uncrowned portrait ('Young Head') of Queen Victoria left, 1854 below; reverse BRITANNIAR: REG: FID: DEF: (Queen of the Britons, Defender of the Faith), Britannia seated right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet, resting right hand on shield at side ornamented with the Union Jack, trident in left hand, rose, shamrock, and thistle in exergue; ex CNG e-sale 453 (2 Oct 2019), lot 893 (part of); ex Brondesbury Park Collection; $130.00 SALE |PRICE| $117.00
 


Great Britain, Victoria, 20 June 1837 - 22 January 1901

|United| |Kingdom|, |Great| |Britain,| |Victoria,| |20| |June| |1837| |-| |22| |January| |1901||half| |farthing|NEW
Queen Victoria inherited the throne at 18, after her father's three elder brothers had all died, leaving no legitimate surviving children. The UK was already a constitutional monarchy, in which the Sovereign held relatively little direct political power. Privately, Victoria attempted to influence government policy and ministerial appointments. Publicly, she became a national icon and was identified with strict standards of personal morality. Her reign of 63 years and seven months is known as the Victorian era.
UK94023. Copper half farthing, SCBC 3951, EF, darker spots on reverse, light marks, weight 2.345 g, maximum diameter 17.5 mm, die axis 0o, London mint, 1852; obverse VICTORIA D: G: BRITANNIAR: REGINA F: D: (Victoria, by the Grace of God, Queen of Britain, Defender of the Faith), first uncrowned portrait ('Young Head') of Queen Victoria left; reverse HALF / FARTHING / 1852 in three lines, crown above, rose, shamrock, and thistle below; ex CNG e-sale 453 (2 Oct 2019), lot 893 (part of); ex Brondesbury Park Collection; $60.00 SALE |PRICE| $54.00
 


Great Britain, Victoria, 20 June 1837 - 22 January 1901

|United| |Kingdom|, |Great| |Britain,| |Victoria,| |20| |June| |1837| |-| |22| |January| |1901||half| |farthing|NEW
Queen Victoria inherited the throne at 18, after her father's three elder brothers had all died, leaving no legitimate surviving children. The UK was already a constitutional monarchy, in which the Sovereign held relatively little direct political power. Privately, Victoria attempted to influence government policy and ministerial appointments. Publicly, she became a national icon and was identified with strict standards of personal morality. Her reign of 63 years and seven months is known as the Victorian era.
UK94024. Copper half farthing, SCBC 3951, EF, stains, light marks and rim bumps, weight 2.386 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 0o, London mint, 1852; obverse VICTORIA D: G: BRITANNIAR: REGINA F: D: (Victoria, by the Grace of God, Queen of Britain, Defender of the Faith), first uncrowned portrait ('Young Head') of Queen Victoria left, ribbons in her hair; reverse HALF / FARTHING / 1842 in three lines, crown above, rose, shamrock, and thistle below; ex CNG e-sale 453 (2 Oct 2019), lot 893 (part of); ex Brondesbury Park Collection; $55.00 SALE |PRICE| $49.00
 


Great Britain, William IV, 26 June 1830 - 20 June 1837

|United| |Kingdom|, |Great| |Britain,| |William| |IV,| |26| |June| |1830| |-| |20| |June| |1837||Fourpence|NEW
In William IV's reign, fourpence (groats) were initially struck for use in British Guiana. The groat returned to domestic circulation in 1836. They were given the nickname 'Joey' after Joseph Hume, MP for Weymouth, Dorset. He had successfully campaigned for their reintroduction. It is said that the average handsome cab fare in London at the time was fourpence and if the passenger tendered a sixpence, the cabbies would often either keep the twopence as a gratuity or give 16 half farthings in return.
UK94090. Silver Fourpence, SCBC 3837, SCWC KM 723, aVF, toned, scratches, weight 1.864 g, maximum diameter 16.3 mm, die axis 0o, London mint, 1837; obverse GULIELMUS IIII D: G: BRITANNIAR: REX F: D: (William IV, by the grace of God, King of the British territories, Defender of the Faith), bare head right; reverse FOUR PENCE, Britannia seated right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet, right hand resting on a Union shield at her side, trident in left hand, 1837 in exergue; $50.00 SALE |PRICE| $45.00
 


Great Britain, Robert Reynolds & Co., Copper Halfpenny Token, 1792

|United| |Kingdom|, |Great| |Britain,| |Robert| |Reynolds| |&| |Co.,| |Copper| |Halfpenny| |Token,| |1792||token|
 
UK94091. Copper token, Dalton-Hamer 233, EF, evenly toned surfaces with a hint of red, light marks; Inscription on edge: PAYABLE AT THE WAREHOUSE OF ROBERT REYNOLDS & CO., weight 11.607 g, maximum diameter 31.1 mm, die axis 180o, 1792; obverse PRO BONO PUBLICO, Lady Godiva aside horse left (from the flag of the city of Coventry), 1792 in exergue; reverse COVENTRY HALFPENNY., castle on the back of an elephant (from the arms of the city of Coventry); ; rare; $180.00 SALE |PRICE| $162.00
 


Coins of England & the United Kingdom - Decimal Issues

|Numismatic| |Books|, |Coins| |of| |England| |&| |the| |United| |Kingdom| |-| |Decimal| |Issues|
Standard catalogue of British coins by denomination. A second edition to the 2015 catalogue due to the quantity of commemorative issues released in 2015.
BK12931. Coins of England & the United Kingdom - Decimal Issues, Spink, 2016, 173 pages, color illustrated, paperback, new; $4.00 SALE |PRICE| $3.60
 










REFERENCES|

Borden D. & I. Brown. "The Milled Coinage of Elizabeth I" in BNJ vol 53. (1983). pp. 108 - 132.
Brown, I., C. Comber, & W. Wilkinson. The Hammered Silver Coins Produced at the Tower Mint During the Reign of Elizabeth I. (Llanfyllin, 2012).
Bull, M. English Silver Coinage Since 1649. (London, 2015).
Davies, P. British Silver Coins Since 1816. (1982).
Elias, E. The Anglo-Gallic Coins. (Paris/London, 1984).
Everson, T. The Galata Guide to the Farthing Tokens of James I and Charles I: A History and Reclassification. (Llanfyllin, 2008).
Freeman, M. Bronze Coinage of Great Britain. (London, 1985).
Krause C. & Mishler, C. Standard Catalog of World Coins. (Iola, WI, 2010 - )
Lawrence, L. "The Coinage of Edward III from 1351" in NC 1926, 1929, 1932, 1933.
Marsh, M. The Gold Half Sovereign. (Cambridge, 2004).
Marsh, M. The Gold Sovereign. (Cambridge, 2002).
Mass, J. Mass Collection, English Short Cross Coins, 1180-1247. SCBI 56. (Oxford, 2001).
Montagu, H. The copper, tin and bronze coinage and patterns for coins of England, from the reign of Elizabeth to that of Her present Majesty. (London, 1893).
Nelson, P. The Coinage of William Wood, 1722-1733. (Brighton, 1903).
North, J. English Hammered Coinage Vol 1: Early Anglo-Saxon to Henry 111 c. A.D. 600-1272. (London, 1994).
North, J. English Hammered Coinage Vol 2: Edward 1 to Charles 11 1272-1662. (London, 1991).
North, J. & P. Preston-Morley. Brooker Collection, Coins of Charles I. SCBI 33. (London, 1984).
Peck, C. English Copper, Tin and Bronze Coins in the British Museum, 1558-1958. (London, 1964).
Spink. Coins of England & the United Kingdom, Standard Catalogue of British Coins. (London, 2012).
Spink. Coins of Scotland, Ireland and the Islands (Jersey, Guernsey, Man and Lundy) Pre-Decimal Issues, Standard Catalogue of British Coins. (Cambridge, 2003).
Wilson, A. & M. Rasmussen. English Pattern Trial and Proof Coins in Gold 1547-1968. (Cambridge, 2000).
Withers, P. & B. Small Change I - V Farthings and Halfpennies. (Llanfyllin, 2003 - 2005).
Withers, P. & B., & S. Ford. Anglo-Gallic Coins - Monnaies Anglo-Francaises. (Llanfyllin, 2015).
Woodhead, P. & D. Liddell. The Herbert Schneider Collection, Volume One, English Gold Coins and their Imitations, Henry III to Elizabeth I, 1257-1603. (London, 1996).
Woodhead, P. The Herbert Schneider Collection, Volume Two, English Gold Coins, 1603-20th Century. (London, 2002).
Woodhead, P. The Herbert Schneider Collection, Volume Three, Anglo-Gallic, Flemish and Brabantine Gold Coins, 1330 - 1794. (London, 2011).

Catalog current as of Wednesday, October 21, 2020.
Page created in 1.734 seconds.
All coins are guaranteed for eternity