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Byzantine Empire, Constans II, September 641 - 15 July 668 A.D.

|Constans| |II|, |Byzantine| |Empire,| |Constans| |II,| |September| |641| |-| |15| |July| |668| |A.D.||12| |nummi|
On 8 November 641, after a fourteen month siege, Alexandria capitulated to the Arab Muslims. In late 645 the Byzantines recaptured Alexandria but lost it again in May 646. This coin may have been struck either during the siege or during the short lived recovery. The last Byzantine attempt to recover Alexandria failed in 654.
BZ94898. Bronze 12 nummi, DOC II-2 105; Morrisson BnF p. 350, 13/Al/AE/01; Hahn MIB 189; Ratto 1321 (Heraclius); SBCV 1027; Sommer 12.63; Wroth BMC -; Tolstoi -, gF, earthen deposits, overstruck, weight 7.571 g, maximum diameter 20.8 mm, die axis 180o, Alexandria mint, Sep - Nov 641 and/or late 645 - May 646; obverse Constans II standing facing, beardless, wearing crown and chlamys, long cross in left hand, globus cruciger in right hand, no legend; reverse large I-B (12 nummi), divided by cross potent on globe, pellet outer right and outer left, AΛEZ (Alexandria) in exergue; from the Ray Nouri Collection; rare; $100.00 (101.00)


Mark Antony, Triumvir and Imperator, 44 - 30 B.C., LEG VII, Ancient Counterfeit

|Marc| |Antony|, |Mark| |Antony,| |Triumvir| |and| |Imperator,| |44| |-| |30| |B.C.,| |LEG| |VII,| |Ancient| |Counterfeit||denarius|NEW
This LEG VII was probably raised by Antony and disbanded by Octavian. It may have been the XV Apollinaris, a legion later was reconstituted by Octavian. The VII Claudia, an old legion of Caesar's, fought for Octavian.
RR111118. Fouree silver plated denarius, Crawford 544/20, Sydenham 1224, BMCRR II East 198, RSC I 34, Sear CRI 357, VF/F, scattered small pits, large plating break and pit on obverse, off center, weight 2.904 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 0o, illegal counterfeiter's mint, c. 31 - 10 B.C.; obverse ANTAVG / IIIVIRRPC, galley right with rowers, mast with banners at prow; reverse LEG - VII, aquila (legionary eagle) between two legionary standards; $110.00 (111.10)


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Tiberias, Galilee

|Trajan|, |Trajan,| |25| |January| |98| |-| |8| |or| |9| |August| |117| |A.D.,| |Tiberias,| |Galilee||AE| |14|NEW
Tiberias was founded by Herod Antipas in 20 A.D. on the shore of Galilee and served as the capital of the province until 61 A.D. In time Tiberias became a very important Jewish religious center.
JD111121. Bronze AE 14, RPC Online III 3930; SNG ANS 1105; Lindgren 1488; BMC Palestine p. 7, 18; Rosenberger III 10; Sofaer 7; Kindler Tiberias 5, aF, highlighting earthen deposits, porous, weight 2.554 g, maximum diameter 14.8 mm, die axis 0o, Galilee, Tiberias (Israel) mint, 107 - 108 A.D.; obverse AY KAI NE TPAIANOC CE ΓE∆ (Imperator Caesar Nerva Traianus Augustus Germanicus Dacicus), laureate head right; reverse TIBEP KΛAY, anchor, date L - (year 90) flanking shaft; rare; $50.00 (50.50)


Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D., Judaea Capta, Caesarea Maritima, Samaria, Judaea

|Judaea| |&| |Palestine|, |Domitian,| |13| |September| |81| |-| |18| |September| |96| |A.D.,| |Judaea| |Capta,| |Caesarea| |Maritima,| |Samaria,| |Judaea||AE| |24|NEW
Judaea Capta issue minted at Caesarea Maritima, Judaea. This issue mistakenly titles Domitian 'IMP XXIII' though he never received a twenty-third acclamation. All known specimens of this type display this error.
JD111095. Bronze AE 24, Meshorer TJC 395a (same c/m); Hendin 6486a (same); SNG ANS 489 (same); Sofaer 38 (same); RPC Online II 2308; BMC Palestine p. 281, 38, aF, near black patina, highlighting earthen deposits, weight 9.839 g, maximum diameter 24.1 mm, die axis 0o, Caesarea Maritima mint, 92 - 93 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM PM TR P XII, laureate head right; countermark: laureate head right (Howgego GIC 133); reverse IMP XXIII COS XVI CENS P P P, Victory advancing left in flowing gown, wreath in right hand, trophy in left hand; $200.00 (202.00)


Herod Archelaus, Ethnarch of Samaria, Judea, and Idumea, 4 B.C. - 6 A.D.

|Herod| |Archelaus|, |Herod| |Archelaus,| |Ethnarch| |of| |Samaria,| |Judea,| |and| |Idumea,| |4| |B.C.| |-| |6| |A.D.||prutah|NEW
Grapes, the vine and wine were an important part of the ancient economy and ritual. Grapes were brought to the Temple as offerings of the first-fruits and wine was offered upon the altar. The vine and grapes decorated the sacred vessels in the sanctuary and a golden vine with clusters of grapes stood at its entrance.
JD111097. Bronze prutah, Hendin 6227; Meshorer TJC 73; BMC Palestine p. 232, 10; SGICV 5539; RPC I 4917, aF, porosity, edge splits, weight 1.608 g, maximum diameter 16.1 mm, die axis 180o, Jerusalem mint, 4 B.C. - 6 A.D.; obverse HPω∆OY (Greek: of Herod), bunch of grapes, leaf on left; reverse EΘNOPXOY (Greek: Ethnarch), tall helmet with crest and neck straps viewed from the front, small caduceus in lower left field; $90.00 (90.90)


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Ascalon, Philistia, Judaea

|Judaea| |&| |Palestine|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.,| |Ascalon,| |Philistia,| |Judaea||AE| |19|NEW
Askalon lies on the shore of the Mediterranean, ten miles north of Gaza and about 40 miles south of Joppa. Herod the Great ruled all of Palestine, except Askalon, which remained a free city. Today, a national park at Ashqelon, Israel includes ruins of Canaanite, Greek, Roman, Byzantine and Crusader walls and buildings.
JD111088. Bronze AE 19, RPC Online III 4002 (9 spec.); Sofaer 123; SNG ANS 714; De Saulcy 3; Rosenberger 151; Yashin 176; BMC Palestine -, F, toned, porous, a little off center, weight 6.283 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 0o, Askalon (Ashqelon, Israel) mint, 118 - 119 A.D.; obverse CEBACTOC (clockwise on right), laureate head right; reverse ACKA-ΛΩ, war-god Phanebal standing left, wearing helmet, harpa in raised right hand, small round shield on left arm, long palm frond in left hand, BKC (year 222) lower right; zero sales of this type listed on Coin Archives in the last two decades; rare; $180.00 (181.80)


Judean Kingdom, Herod Agrippa I, 37 - 44 A.D.

|Agrippa| |I|, |Judean| |Kingdom,| |Herod| |Agrippa| |I,| |37| |-| |44| |A.D.||prutah|NEW
Agrippa was son of Aristobulus and Bernice, a grandson of Herod the Great. He spent his boyhood at the imperial court in Rome. His friend Caligula bestowed former territories of Philip and Herod Antipas. Claudius bestowed Judaea. He had James, the brother of John, executed (Acts 12:1-2) and imprisoned Peter (Acts 12:3-5).
JD111089. Bronze prutah, Hendin 6274, Meshorer TJC 120, RPC I 4981, SNG ANS 262, Sofaer 153, F, grainy porous surfaces, off center, obv. edge beveled, tiny edge crack, weight 2.226 g, maximum diameter 16.1 mm, die axis 0o, Jerusalem mint, 41 - 42 A.D.; obverse AΓPIΠA BACIΛEWC (King Agrippa), umbrella-like canopy with fringes; reverse three heads of barley between two leaves, L - ς (year 6) divided across field; $40.00 (40.40)


Ascalon, Philistia, Judaea, Late 1st Century B.C.

|Judaea| |&| |Palestine|, |Ascalon,| |Philistia,| |Judaea,| |Late| |1st| |Century| |B.C.||AE| |16|NEW
Askalon lies on the shore of the Mediterranean, ten miles north of Gaza and about 40 miles south of Joppa. Herod the Great ruled all of Palestine, except Askalon, which remained a free city. Today, a national park at Ashqelon, Israel includes ruins of Canaanite, Greek, Roman, Byzantine and Crusader walls and buildings.
JD111091. Bronze AE 16, cf. RPC Online I 4873 (10 spec.); Sofaer 47; Baramki AUB 52; Rosenberger 79; BMC Palestine p. 110, 36, gF, green patina, earthen encrustations, irregular flan with part of the edge ragged, weight 2.831 g, maximum diameter 15.9 mm, die axis 0o, Askalon (Ashqelon, Israel) mint, late 1st century B.C.; obverse bare-headed and beardless young male head right; reverse prow of war galley left with ram, acrostolium, and oars, AΣ above (Σ in the form of a squared C); rare; $150.00 (151.50)


Persian Empire, Samaria, 5th - 4th Century B.C.

|Persian| |Rule|, |Persian| |Empire,| |Samaria,| |5th| |-| |4th| |Century| |B.C.||half| |ma'ha| |(1/48| |shekel)|NEW
Samaria was the capital of the northern Kingdom of Israel in the 9th - 8th centuries B.C. The Assyrians took the city and the northern kingdom in 722/721 B.C. The city did not recover until the Persian period, the mid 5th century. The tensions between the ruling Sanballat family and Jerusalem under the governorship of Nehemiah are documented in the Bible (Ezra 4:10, Neh 4:78). Samaria became Hellenistic in 332 B.C. Thousands of Macedonian soldiers were settled there following a revolt. The Judaean king John Hyrcanus destroyed Samaria in 108 B.C., but it was resettled under Alexander Jannaeus. In 63 B.C., Samaria was annexed to the Roman province of Syria. Herod the Great fortified the city and renamed it Sebaste. The ruins are located in the Samaria mountains almost 10 km to the northwest of Nablus.

This reverse type is copied from the obols of Sidon.
GS110667. Silver half ma'ha (1/48 shekel), unpublished denomination, cf. Meshorer-Qedar 203 (obol, 0.56g); Sofaer 134 (obol, 0.72); Samuels -; SNG ANS -; Hendin -; HGC 10 -, VF, centered, toned, rough, weight 0.223 g, maximum diameter 6.8 mm, die axis 0o, Samaria (Sebastia, West Bank) mint, 5th - 4th Century B.C.; obverse head of satrap left, bearded, wearing tiara and Assyrian coiffure; reverse Great king kneeling right, wearing kidaris and kandys, fighting a lion standing on its hind legs, the king has seized the lion by the mane with his left hand and holds a dagger in his right hand, all within a square dot border in a shallow square incuse; ex Gorny & Mosch auction 289 (10 Oct 2022), lot 450; ex Gert Cleff Collection (Wuppertal); ex Numismatica Ars Classica auction 64 (17-18 May 2012), lot 1679; this coin is one of only two specimens of this type sold in the last two decades recorded on Coin Archives; extremely rare; $750.00 (757.50)


Persian Empire, Samaria, c. 375 - 332 B.C.

|Persian| |Rule|, |Persian| |Empire,| |Samaria,| |c.| |375| |-| |332| |B.C.||ma'ah-obol|NEW
Samaria was the capital of the northern Kingdom of Israel in the 9th - 8th centuries B.C. The Assyrians took the city and the northern kingdom in 722/721 B.C. The city did not recover until the Persian period, the mid 5th century. The tensions between the ruling Sanballat family and Jerusalem under the governorship of Nehemiah are documented in the Bible (Ezra 4:10, Neh 4:78). Samaria became Hellenistic in 332 B.C. Thousands of Macedonian soldiers were settled there following a revolt. The Judaean king John Hyrcanus destroyed Samaria in 108 B.C., but it was resettled under Alexander Jannaeus. In 63 B.C., Samaria was annexed to the Roman province of Syria. Herod the Great fortified the city and renamed it Sebaste. The ruins are located in the Samaria mountains almost 10 km to the northwest of Nablus.
GS110668. Silver ma'ah-obol, Meshorer-Qedar 188, Sofaer 165, HGC 10 -, Sunrise -, Hendin -, SNG ANS -, VF, centered, toned, light marks, die break upper reverse, weight 0.614 g, maximum diameter 9.7 mm, die axis 180o, Samaria (Sebastia, West Bank) mint, c. 375 - 332 B.C.; obverse head of the satrap right, bearded, wearing Kyrbasia (Persian tiara); reverse head right, bare-headed, bearded; ex Gorny & Mosch auction 289 (10 Oct 2022), lot 422; ex Gert Cleff Collection (Wuppertal); ex Italo Vecchi (London) auction 10 (24-25 Mar 1998), lot 436; rare; $500.00 (505.00)











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