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Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus IV Epiphanes, 175 - 164 B.C., Quasi-Municipal Antioch Issue

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Antiochus IV took the name "Epiphanes," meaning "Select of God." His subjects made a pun on his name, calling him "Epimanes" or "madman." In 168 B.C., Antiochus IV ordered the Jews to worship Greek gods. The Temple in Jerusalem was seized and dedicated to Zeus. The Jews revolted and after three years of fighting, Judah Maccabee defeated the Seleukid army. Hanukkah, the Festival of Lights, commemorates the rededication of the Temple in 165 B.C. According to the Talmud, there was only enough consecrated olive oil to fuel the eternal flame in the Temple for one day. Miraculously, the oil burned for eight days, enough time to prepare and consecrate fresh oil.
GY87388. Bronze AE 22, Houghton-Lorber II 1416(2); Houghton CSE 129; Babelon 628; BMC Seleucid p. 40, 65 var. (controls); SNG Spaer 1008 var. (same); HGC 9 656 (R1), aVF, black patina, red earthen deposits, porous, weight 6.817 g, maximum diameter 22.0 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, summer 168 - 164 B.C.; obverse radiate and diademed head of Antiochos IV right, one diadem flying up behind, the other falling forward over shoulder; reverse Zeus standing slightly right, head left, raising wreath right hand, resting left hand on side, ANTIOXEΩN downward on right, TΩN / ΠPOΣ ∆AΦNHI in two lines downward on left, ΩΠA monogram (control) outer left, AB (control) outer right; rare; $100.00 (85.00)


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus IV Epiphanes, 175 - 164 B.C.

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Antiochus IV took the name "Epiphanes," meaning "Select of God." His subjects made a pun on his name, calling him "Epimanes" or "madman." In 168 B.C., Antiochus IV ordered the Jews to worship Greek gods. The Temple in Jerusalem was seized and dedicated to Zeus. The Jews revolted and after three years of fighting, Judah Maccabee defeated the Seleukid army. Hanukkah, the Festival of Lights, commemorates the rededication of the Temple in 165 B.C. According to the Talmud, there was only enough consecrated olive oil to fuel the eternal flame in the Temple for one day. Miraculously, the oil burned for eight days, enough time to prepare and consecrate fresh oil.
GY87389. Bronze AE 19, Houghton-Lorber II 1499e; BMC Seleucids p. 41, 74; Babelon 609; HGC 9 672 (R1-2), VF, mostly black patina, light deposits, porous, weight 6.058 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch on the Kallirhoe (Edessa, Mesopotamia) mint, c. 168 - 164 B.C.; obverse radiate and diademed head of Antiochos IV right; reverse Zeus standing left, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, ANTIOXEΩN downward on right, TΩN / EΠI KAΛΛIPOHI in two downward lines on left, CΩ (control) outer left; rare; $80.00 (68.00)


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus IV Epiphanes, 175 - 164 B.C.

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Antiochus IV took the name "Epiphanes," meaning "Select of God." His subjects made a pun on his name, calling him "Epimanes" or "madman." In 168 B.C., Antiochus IV ordered the Jews to worship Greek gods. The Temple in Jerusalem was seized and dedicated to Zeus. The Jews revolted and after three years of fighting, Judah Maccabee defeated the Seleukid army. Hanukkah, the Festival of Lights, commemorates the rededication of the Temple in 165 B.C. According to the Talmud, there was only enough consecrated olive oil to fuel the eternal flame in the Temple for one day. Miraculously, the oil burned for eight days, enough time to prepare and consecrate fresh oil.
GY87384. Bronze dichalkon, Houghton-Lorber 1509, SNG Spaer 1204, BMC Seleucid 24, Newel ESM p. 272, Houghton CSE 984, Hoover Seleukid 637 (R2), F, brown tone, light corrosion, edge crack, weight 8.286 g, maximum diameter 20.1 mm, die axis 0o, Seleucia on the Tigris (south of Baghdad, Iraq) mint, c. 173 - 164 B.C.; obverse radiate head of Antiochos IV right, B over X (mark of value = dichalkon) lower left, fillet border; reverse goddess Nicephorus seated left on high backed throne, wearing polos, Nike in extended right hand, long beaked bird left at feet, BAΣIΛEΩΣ downward on right, ANTIOXOY downward on left; rare; $80.00 (68.00)


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus IV Epiphanes, 175 - 164 B.C.

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Antiochus IV took the name "Epiphanes," meaning "Select of God." His subjects made a pun on his name, calling him "Epimanes" or "madman." In 168 B.C., Antiochus IV ordered the Jews to worship Greek gods. The Temple in Jerusalem was seized and dedicated to Zeus. The Jews revolted and after three years of fighting, Judah Maccabee defeated the Seleukid army. Hanukkah, the Festival of Lights, commemorates the rededication of the Temple in 165 B.C. According to the Talmud, there was only enough consecrated olive oil to fuel the eternal flame in the Temple for one day. Miraculously, the oil burned for eight days, enough time to prepare and consecrate fresh oil.
GY87385. Bronze AE 21, Houghton-Lorber 1425(1), Babelon 647, Hoover Syrian 657 (R2), BMC Seleucid 84 var., SNG Spaer 1046 var., Houghton CSE 405 var. (all var. monograms), aVF, well centered, brown tone, corrosion, weight 8.039 g, maximum diameter 20.9 mm, die axis 135o, quasi-municipal, Seleukia Pieria mint, c. 169 - 168 B.C.; obverse diademed and radiate head of Antiochos IV right; reverse vertical winged thunderbolt, ΣEΛEYKEΩN/TΩN in two lines downward on right, EM ΠIEPIAI downward on left, monogram over quiver (controls) outer left, monogram (control) outer right, all in oak wreath; rare; $95.00 (80.75)


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus IV Epiphanes, 175 - 164 B.C.

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Antiochus IV took the name "Epiphanes," meaning "Select of God." His subjects made a pun on his name, calling him "Epimanes" or "madman." In 168 B.C., Antiochus IV ordered the Jews to worship Greek gods. The Temple in Jerusalem was seized and dedicated to Zeus. The Jews revolted and after three years of fighting, Judah Maccabee defeated the Seleukid army. Hanukkah, the Festival of Lights, commemorates the rededication of the Temple in 165 B.C. According to the Talmud, there was only enough consecrated olive oil to fuel the eternal flame in the Temple for one day. Miraculously, the oil burned for eight days, enough time to prepare and consecrate fresh oil.
GY87386. Bronze AE 21, Houghton-Lorber II 1418(1)a, Houghton CSE 131, Hoover Syrian 656 (R1), BMC Seleucid 61 var. (control), Babelon 631 var. (same), VF, well centered, black patina with red earthen highlighting, scratches, encrustations, some light corrosion, weight 8.345 g, maximum diameter 21.0 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 168 - 164 B.C.; obverse radiate and diademed head of Antiochos IV right, one diadem end flying up, the other falling forward over shoulder; reverse Zeus standing slightly right, head left, wreath in raised right hand, ANTIOΞEΩN downward on right, TΩN ΠPOΣ ∆AΦNHI, A over M (control) outer left; rare; $80.00 (68.00)


Tiberius, 19 August 14 - 16 March 37 A.D.

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In 36 A.D., Herod Antipas suffered major losses in a war with Aretas IV of Nabataea, provoked partly by Antipas' divorce of Aretas' daughter. According to Josephus, Herod's defeat was popularly believed to be divine punishment for his execution of John the Baptist. Tiberius ordered Vitellius, the governor of Syria, to capture or kill Aretas, but Vitellius was reluctant to support Herod and abandoned his campaign upon Tiberius' death in 37.
SL87331. Silver denarius, Giard Lyon, group 5, 152; RIC I 30 (C); BMCRE I 60; RSC II 16a; SRCV I 1763, NGC AU (about uncirculated), strike 5/5, surface 3/5 (2490380-003), weight 3.561 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 270o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, c. 36 - 37 A.D.; obverse TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS, laureate head right, laurel wreath ties fall in small undulations (waves); reverse PONTIF MAXIM (high priest), Pax (or Livia as Pax) seated right on chair with decorated legs, a single line below, long scepter vertical behind in her right hand, branch in left hand, feet on footstool; certified (slabbed) by NGC (the photograph was taken before certification); $800.00 (680.00)


Probus, Summer 276 - September 282 A.D.; EQVITI Series II of Ticinum, Q XXI

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Ticinum mint EQVITI series II - click "EQVITI" to read the NumisWiki article, "Coins of Probus with Coded Markings of EQVITI Embedded in the mint mark." The letter "I" in the reverse field is the fourth letter of the codeword EQVITI. The letter "Q" in the exergue indicates this coin was struck by the fourth officina (mint workshop). The letters of the word EQVITI are coded in the mint marks of coins from all the officinae of the mint, with the specific letters of the codeword assigned to each officina in order corresponding with their officina numbers. This codeword probably refers to cavalry. It may be AEQVITI truncated because there were only six officinae in operation.
RA87271. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 508; Hunter IV 148; Pink VI-1, p. 56; Cohen VI 352; SRCV III -; Hunter IV 148; Pink VI-1, p. 56; Cohen VI 352; SRCV III -, gVF, well centered on a broad oval flan, much silvering remains, weight 3.739 g, maximum diameter 24.5 mm, die axis 0o, 4th officina, Ticinum (Pavia, Italy) mint, 280 A.D.; obverse IMP C PROBVS AVG, radiate mantled bust left, eagle-tipped scepter in right; reverse MARTI PACIF (to Mars the peacemaker), Mars advancing left, holding olive-branch, shield and spear, I left, QXXI in exergue; $80.00 (68.00)


Cappadocian Kingdom, Ariarathes X Eusebes Philadelphos, 42 - 36 B.C.

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Ariarathes X Eusebes Philadelphos (Pious, brother-loving) was the king of Cappadocia from c. 42 - 36 B.C. He was of Persian and Greek ancestry. His father was King Ariobarzanes II of Cappadocia and his mother was Queen Athenais. He became king after his brother Ariobarzanes III Philoromaios was killed. His rule did not last long as Mark Antony of Rome removed and executed him, replacing him with Sisines of Komana, who became Archelaus of Cappadocia.
GB83633. Bronze AE 15, HGC 856 (R2); Simonetta p. 48, 4 (uncertain attribution), F, encrustations, small flan, weight 2.584 g, maximum diameter 14.7 mm, die axis 0o, Mazaka-Eusebeia (Kayseri, Turkey) mint, 42 - 36 B.C.; obverse draped bust of Artemis left, wearing diadem, bow and quiver on shoulder; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ APIAPAΘOY, stag standing left; rare; $60.00 (51.00)


Akragas, Sicily, c. 420 - 406 B.C.

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On similar common types, the eagle is right, sometimes devouring the fish, and on the reverse the positions of octopus and conch are switched. This particular type with the eagle screaming left and the octopus to the left the conch is missing from all the references examined (Calciati, HGC 2, SNG ANS, SNG Cop, SNG Munchen, SNG Tubingen, SNG Lloyd, BMC Sicily, McClean, Weber, et al.). This coin is the only example on Coin Archives (the Savoca auction).
GB86317. Bronze hemilitron, apparently unpublished; Calciati 47 var. (conch to left); HGC 2 135 (R1) corr. (same obv. die but text says eagle right) var. (conch to left), VF, well centered, some porosity, reverse slightly rough, weight 21.219 g, maximum diameter 27.9 mm, die axis 90o, Akragas (Agrigento, Sicily, Italy) mint, c. 420 - 406 B.C.; obverse AKP-AΓANTIN-ON, eagle standing left on fish, raising head up screaming, wings open; reverse crab from above, eel in right claw, octopus to left of conch shell below, six pellets around; ex Savoca Numismatik, auction 4 (30 Aug 2015), lot 176; extremely rare variety; $500.00 (425.00)


Lycian League, Myra, Masicytus, Lycia, c. 35 - 27 B.C.

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Cragus and Masicytus were the two principal districts of Lycia, named for the Cragus and Masicytus mountain ranges. Xanthus, Patara, and Tlos were towns in Cragus. Myra, the primary town in Masicytus, was on the river Myros, 5.4 kilometers from the sea. Saint Paul visited the port on his way to Italy. The remains of the ancient city are some of the most beautiful ruins in Lycia and include a large theater.
GB86566. Bronze half unit, Troxell 174 (4 spec.); Waddington 3089; BMC Lycia p. 70, 5 corr. (MY); RPC I 3315; Mseler -; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -, F, green patina, scratches, obverse off center, weight 2.327 g, maximum diameter 13.8 mm, die axis 0o, Myra (Demre, Turkey) mint, c. 35 - 27 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse bow and quiver in saltire (crossed), ΛYKI (Lycia) above, M-A (Masicytus) across field, all within an incuse square; from the David Cannon Collection, ex Beast Coins; very rare; $80.00 (68.00)











Catalog current as of Saturday, October 20, 2018.
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