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Selge, Pisidia, c. 350 - 300 B.C.

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Selge, Pisidia on the southern slope of Mount Taurus where the river Eurymedon (Köprücay) forces its way through the mountains, was once the most powerful and populous city of Pisidia. Protected by precipices, torrents, and an army of 20,000 regarded as worthy kinsmen of the Spartans, Selge was never subject to a foreign power until Rome. In the 5th century A.D., Zosimus calls it a little town, but it was still strong enough to repel a body of Goths. The remains of the city consist mainly of parts of the encircling wall and of the acropolis. A few traces have survived of the gymnasium, the stoa, the stadium and the basilica. There are also the outlines of two temples, but the best-conserved monument is the theater, restored in the 3rd century AD.
GS86788. Silver trihemiobol, BMC Lycia p. 257, 4; SNG BnF 1928 var.; SNGvA 5281 var., Klein 631 var., SNG Tub 4466 var., SNG Cop -, SNG Pfalzer - (all var. astragalos behind), EF, well centered, some die wear, light marks, weight 0.874 g, maximum diameter 10.7 mm, die axis 180o, Selge (southern slope of Mount Taurus, Turkey) mint, c. 350 - 300 B.C.; obverse facing head of Medusa (gorgoneion), tongue protruding; reverse head of Athena right in crested Attic helmet, astragalos before on left; extremely rare, an apparently unpublished variety and the only specimen known to Forum; $340.00 (€289.00)


Probus, Summer 276 - September 282 A.D.

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Providentia is the personification of the ability to foresee and to make provision for the future. This ability was considered essential for the emperor and providentia was among the embodiments of virtues that were part of the imperial cult. Cicero said that providentia, memoria (memory) and intellegentia (understanding) are the three main components of prudentia, the knowledge what is good or bad or neither.
RA87277. Billon antoninianus, unpublished variety; RIC 722 var. (bust type), Alföldi type 53, unlisted var. (bust type and officina not listed with this obv. legend), Choice aEF, nice dark brown patina, excellent portrait, speckled silvering, light cleaning marks, weight 3.920 g, maximum diameter 22.2 mm, die axis 180o, 4th officina, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, 7th emission, 280 A.D.; obverse VIRTVS PROBI AVG (the valor of Emperor Probus), radiate, helmeted and cuirassed bust left, spear in right hand over shoulder; reverse PROVIDENT AVG (the foresight of the Emperor), Providentia standing left, globe in right hand, transverse long scepter in left hand, Q right, XXI in exergue; very rare; $150.00 (€127.50)


Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D.

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S - P flanking across the fields with MC in the exergue (S-P/MC) is not a standard mintmark, most references cited do not list any examples with this mark. RIC V-2 does list one type each for Pax, Pietas, and Salus. MC in the exergue was used at Camulodunum for earlier issues but without S - P. Perhaps the rare specimens with this mintmark were issued in a small quantity for some special purpose. Perhaps the engravers just unintentionally added the M out of habit. Perhaps they are all unofficial. Further study is needed.
RA73505. Billon antoninianus, apparently unpublished, RIC V-2 -, Web Carausius -, SRCV IV -, Hunter IV -, Burton Latimer -, Bicester -, Linchmere -;, VF/F, dark patina, nice portrait, minor patina chipping on edge, top half of reverse mostly weak or off flan, weight 4.334 g, maximum diameter 22.3 mm, die axis 225o, unofficial or Camulodunum (Colchester, England) mint, 292 - 293 A.D.; obverse IMP C CARAVSIVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse PROVID AVGGG (the foresight of the three emperors), Providentia standing left, raising globe in right hand, transverse scepter in left hand, S - P flanking across fields, MC in exergue; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection; none of the approximately eighty published Providentia varieties struck under Carausius have this S - P / MC mintmark, no others known to Forum; $240.00 (€204.00)


Ephesos, Ionia, 133 - 88 B.C.

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The Ephesians believe that Artemis was born in Ephesus and her temple at Ephesus, the Artemision, was one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. Antipater of Sidon described the temple in his list of the world's Seven Wonder: "I have set eyes on the wall of lofty Babylon on which is a road for chariots, and the statue of Zeus by the Alpheus, and the hanging gardens, and the colossus of the Sun, and the huge labour of the high pyramids, and the vast tomb of Mausolus; but when I saw the house of Artemis that mounted to the clouds, those other marvels lost their brilliancy, and I said, "Lo, apart from Olympus, the Sun never looked on aught so grand."
SH87300. Gold stater, Jenkins Hellenistic, pl. B, 6; Montagu I 567; SNGvA 1869 var. (control); Head HN p. 69, 2 ff. var. (control); Gulbenkian 985 var. (same); SNG Cop -, Choice gVF, well centered and struck, attractive style, die wear, bumps and marks, weight 8.463 g, maximum diameter 21.1 mm, die axis 0o, Ephesos mint, c. 123 - 119 B.C.; obverse draped bust of Artemis right, wearing stephane and single-pendant earring, hair drawn together and tied in the back, bow and quiver over shoulder; reverse Ephesian Artemis cult statue facing, kalathos on head, fore-arms outward horizontal at sides, fillet hanging from each hand, E−Φ flanking head, thymiaterion (control) inner right between legs and fillet; rare; $6800.00 (€5780.00)


Olbia, Sarmatia, c. 5th Century B.C.

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Small bronze dolphins were cast in Olbia, Thrace, beginning around 550 - 525 B.C., at first as sacrificial objects for the worship of Apollo. Soon after their introduction it seems they were used as an early form of proto-money. Later, when proper coins came into the area, we find the cast bronze dolphins in hoards mixed along with coins, strong evidence that they were being used as money.

Most of the Olbia dolphins were cast in trees with a sprue attached to where the tail would be. Many like this one were broken off in the body of the dolphin, leaving them without a tail.
GB87302. Bronze cast dolphin, cf. SGCV I 1684, SNG BM 360 ff., SNG Stancomb 334 ff., SNG Pushkin 12 ff., SNG Cop 67 ff., VF, weight 0.927 g, maximum diameter 24.2 mm, Olbia (Parutino, Ukraine) mint, obverse dolphin with raised eye and dorsal fin; ex Vaughn Rare Coin Gallery; $36.00 (€30.60)


China, Warring States, Chu Kingdom, c. 476 - 221 B.C., Ghost Face Money

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This cowrie form is nicknamed Ant Nose Money and the specific type is nicknamed the Ghost Face Coin. The "face" is actually the characters "Gui Lian Qian." David Hartill notes, "They have been found in areas to the south of the Yellow River corresponding to the State of Chu in the Warring States period. One hoard was of some 16,000 pieces. Their weight is very variable, and their alloy often contains a high proportion of lead."
CH87310. Bronze cowrie, Hartill 1.4, Schjoth 15-17, Fisher 4, VF, red and green mottled patina, weight 2.026 g, maximum diameter 16.9 mm, c. 476 - 221 B.C.; obverse Gui Lian Qian; reverse plain; $60.00 (€51.00)


Ionia, c. 650 - 600 B.C., Plain Globular Type

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Rare and important. This is an example of the very earliest form of coinage; a type-less (blank) electrum globule, weighed to a specific standard, with a simple square punch mark on one side (two or three punch marks on larger denominations).
SH87337. Electrum hemihekte, 1/12 stater; SNG Kayhan 676, SNGvA 7763, Rosen 324, Traité -, Weidauer -, VF, bumps and scratches, weight 1.237 g, maximum diameter 7.4 mm, uncertain Ionian mint, period of the Artemision Find, c. 650 - 600 B.C.; obverse plain globular surface; reverse incuse roughly square pyramidal punch; $600.00 (€510.00)


Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D.

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Colchester (Camulodunum) and its wall were rebuilt by the Romans after Queen Boudica led a rebellion in A.D. 60 and destroyed the town. Balkerne Gate in Colchester is the largest Roman arch in Britain. Balkerne Gate Colchester

RA73498. Billon antoninianus, Hunter IV 146, Bourne Carausius 131, RIC V-2 371 (R) var. (no cuir.), Webb Carausius 430 var. (same), Burton Latimer 49 var. (same), Choice F, well centered on a broad flan, black patina, light red earthen deposits, weight 3.892 g, maximum diameter 23.5 mm, die axis 180o, Camulodunum (Colchester, England) mint, c. mid 292 - mid 293; obverse IMP C CARAVSIVS P AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, late reign tetrarchic portrait; reverse PROVID AVGGG (the foresight of the three emperors), Providentia standing left, globe in right hand, transverse scepter in left, S - P across fields, C in exergue; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection; rare; $180.00 (€153.00)


Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D.

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In The Reign and Coinage of Carausius, Percy Webb wrote that for Carausius, "...the type Providentia appears with some twenty-four varieties of reverse legend, while the joint effect of obverse and reverse variations of legend and type is to produce upwards of eighty varieties of coins dedicated to that divinity."
RA73501. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 152 (R2) var. (PROVIDENTIA AVGGG), SRCV IV 13697 var. (same), Webb Carausius 178 var. (same), Bourne 33 var. (same), Hunter IV - (p. ccii), aVF/aF, well centered, green patina, near complete legends, nice portrait, corrosion, pit/flaw reverse left field, weight 3.282 g, maximum diameter 22.2 mm, die axis 0o, Londinium (London, England) mint, 292 - 293 A.D.; obverse IMP C CARAVSIVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse PROVIDEN AVGGG (the foresight of the three emperors), Providentia standing left with baton and cornucopia, globe at feet left, S - P across fields, MLXXI in exergue; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection, extremely rare, apparently unpublished, the only specimen known to Forum; $220.00 (€187.00)


Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D.

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In The Reign and Coinage of Carausius, Percy Webb wrote that for Carausius, "...the type Providentia appears with some twenty-four varieties of reverse legend, while the joint effect of obverse and reverse variations of legend and type is to produce upwards of eighty varieties of coins dedicated to that divinity."
RA73503. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 152 (R2), SRCV IV 13697, Webb Carausius 178, Bourne 33, Askew 183, Hunter IV - (p. ccii), aVF, good portrait, mottled green patina, tight flan, rough, pitting smoothed to remove corrosion, weight 3.526 g, maximum diameter 21.9 mm, die axis 180o, Londinium (London, England) mint, 292 - 293 A.D.; obverse IMP C CARAVSIVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse PROVIDEN AVGGG (the foresight of the three emperors), Providentia standing left with baton and cornucopia, globe at feet left, S - P across fields, MLXXI in exergue; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection; rare; $220.00 (€187.00)











Catalog current as of Tuesday, July 17, 2018.
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