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Antiquities Categorized by Type
Roman Syria-Palestina, Jewish, Lead Bulla Seal, 7 Branched Menorah, c. 5th - 6th Century A.D.

|Seals|, |Roman| |Syria-Palestina,| |Jewish,| |Lead| |Bulla| |Seal,| |7| |Branched| |Menorah,| |c.| |5th| |-| |6th| |Century| |A.D.||bulla| |(tag| |seal)|
A bulla (plural, bullae) is a lump of clay or lead molded around a cord and stamped with a seal that identifies the sender. With a bulla in place, a container cannot be violated without visible damage to either the bulla or the cord, revealing the tampering. Bullae depicting a menorah are known but very rare and not well documented. Dattari-Savio p. 327, 3 is a 1901 rubbing of a very similar menorah sealing. Michael Still lists two menorah sealings in his thesis on Roman seals, 1696 with a Latin inscription reverse, 1765 with a Hebrew inscription reverse. The recently published catalogue of the Vossen collection by Gert Boersema and Bill Dalzell, has two Menorah seals, numbers 181 and 182, both with blank reverses. There are also a few examples known from auctions. A FORVM member posted a bulla of this exact type from his collection on the Classical Numismatic Discussion on the Forum Ancient Coins website. We received three examples of this type on consignment, all with the same fire damage, suggesting they were found together.
JD98655. Lead bulla (tag seal), VF, chip on reverse, light earthen deposits, raised bumps from exposure to an ancient fire that heated and expanded air bubbles within the lead, weight 4.679 g, maximum diameter 15.9 mm, c. 5th - 6th Century A.D.; obverse seven branched menorah with tripod base; reverse lulav, uncertain Syriac inscription; very rare; $750.00 SALE PRICE $675.00


Roman Syria-Palestina, Jewish, Lead Bulla Seal, 7 Branched Menorah, c. 5th - 6th Century A.D.

|Seals|, |Roman| |Syria-Palestina,| |Jewish,| |Lead| |Bulla| |Seal,| |7| |Branched| |Menorah,| |c.| |5th| |-| |6th| |Century| |A.D.||bulla| |(tag| |seal)|
A bulla (plural, bullae) is a lump of clay or lead molded around a cord and stamped with a seal that identifies the sender. With a bulla in place, a container cannot be violated without visible damage to either the bulla or the cord, revealing the tampering. Bullae depicting a menorah are known but very rare and not well documented. Dattari-Savio p. 327, 3 is a 1901 rubbing of a very similar menorah sealing. Michael Still lists two menorah sealings in his thesis on Roman seals, 1696 with a Latin inscription reverse, 1765 with a Hebrew inscription reverse. The recently published catalogue of the Vossen collection by Gert Boersema and Bill Dalzell, has two Menorah seals, numbers 181 and 182, both with blank reverses. There are also a few examples known from auctions. A FORVM member posted a bulla of this exact type from his collection on the Classical Numismatic Discussion on the Forum Ancient Coins website. We received three examples of this type on consignment, all with the same fire damage, suggesting they were found together.
JD98656. Lead bulla (tag seal), VF/Fair, light earthen deposits, raised bumps from exposure to an ancient fire that heated and expanded air bubbles within the lead, c. 5th - 6th Century A.D.; obverse seven branched menorah with tripod base; reverse lulav, uncertain Syriac inscription (obscure); very rare; $380.00 SALE PRICE $342.00


Lot of 100 Bronze Ancient Trilobate Arrowheads, Hellenistic - Byzantine, c. 300 B.C. - 1000 A.D.

|Metal| |Arrowheads|, |Lot| |of| |100| |Bronze| |Ancient| |Trilobate| |Arrowheads,| |Hellenistic| |-| |Byzantine,| |c.| |300| |B.C.| |-| |1000| |A.D.|
 
LT96894. Lot of 100 bronze trilobate arrowheads, mostly or all Hellenistic - Byzantine, c. 300 B.C. - 1000 A.D., c. 12 - 28 mm, some complete and intact, some with chips or bends, unattributed to type, no tags, from the same larger lot as the arrowheads in the photograph, as-is, no returns; $500.00 SALE PRICE $450.00


Lot of 100 Bronze Ancient Trilobate Arrowheads, Hellenistic - Byzantine, c. 300 B.C. - 1000 A.D.

|Metal| |Arrowheads|, |Lot| |of| |100| |Bronze| |Ancient| |Trilobate| |Arrowheads,| |Hellenistic| |-| |Byzantine,| |c.| |300| |B.C.| |-| |1000| |A.D.|
LT96895. Lot of 100 bronze trilobate arrowheads, mostly or all Hellenistic - Byzantine, c. 300 B.C. - 1000 A.D., c. 12 - 28 mm, some complete and intact, some with chips or bends, unattributed to type, no tags, from the same larger lot as the arrowheads in the photograph, as-is, no returns; $500.00 SALE PRICE $450.00


Ancient Near Eastern Cylinder Seals, From the Marcopoli Collection

|Antiquities| |Books|, |Ancient| |Near| |Eastern| |Cylinder| |Seals,| |From| |the| |Marcopoli| |Collection|
Ex Libris Alex G. Malloy
BK21982. Ancient Near Eastern Cylinder Seals, From the Marcopoli Collection by Beatrice Teissier, 407 pages, 643 seals, illustrated, hardcover, dust cover wear, international shipping at actual cost of shipping; $350.00 SALE PRICE $315.00


Late Roman - Byzantine, Holyland (Syro-Palestinian), Bi-Lanceolate Pottery Oil Lamp, c. 300 - 500 A.D.

|Oil| |Lamps|, |Late| |Roman| |-| |Byzantine,| |Holyland| |(Syro-Palestinian),| |Bi-Lanceolate| |Pottery| |Oil| |Lamp,| |c.| |300| |-| |500| |A.D.|
Adler notes these lamps are found throughout the northern part of Israel, especially in Beit Shean and Hamat Gader, and date to the fourth and fifth centuries. At this time, Beit Shean, was primarily Christian, but evidence of Jewish habitation and a Samaritan synagogue indicate established minority communities. Hamat Gader was already a well known health and recreation site in Roman times, mentioned in Strabo, Origen and Eunapius, as well as the Rabbinic literature. Construction of the bath complex began in the 2nd century by the 10th Roman Legion, which was garrisoned in nearby Gadara (modern Umm Qais). The ancient Hebrew name means hot springs of (the ancient city of) Gadara. The Arabic name El-Hamma preserves this, and the name of the tel located near the site, Tel Bani, is a corruption of the Latin word meaning "baths." The empress Aelia Eudocia composed a poem praising the qualities of the multiple springs which was inscribed so that visitors could see it as they went into the pool. The photo to the right is of the ancient Roman baths. Click the photo to see a larger image.Hammat Gader Baths
AL93918. Bi-lanceolate pottery oil lamp; Adler Collection (website) type N2; 8.0 cm (3 1/8") long, near Choice, complete and intact, light encrustation, wear, c. 300 - 500 A.D.; pink-buff clay, mold made with incised decoration, the body includes the entire lamp from tip of nozzle to tip of "tongue" handle, wide rim surrounds a large fill hole, incised herring-bone geometric wreath pattern on narrow convex shoulders, two incised lengthwise lines on the handle, incised lines between fill hold rim and nozzle; bi-lanceolate oil lamp BETTER condition than the lamp in the photo, limit one per customer please; $80.00 SALE PRICE $72.00


De l'archéologie à l'histoire, Lampes antiques du Bilad es Sham : Jordanie, Syrie, Liban, Palestine

|Oil| |Lamps|, |De| |l'archéologie| |à| |l'histoire,| |Lampes| |antiques| |du| |Bilad| |es| |Sham| |:| |Jordanie,| |Syrie,| |Liban,| |Palestine|
The colloquium that took place in the autumn of 2005 both in Amman and in the sumptuous site of Petra had the objective of bringing together researchers from more than thirty countries, with the theme of "ancient lamps" of the Middle East, Jordan, Lebanon and Syria. From an archaeological point of view, it was an unprecedented initiative: to bring together the best specialists of the region by asking them to attach themselves to a common but often neglected type of material, in order to present the most recent results of their research, both the lamps themselves and the contexts in which they had been discovered (stratigraphy, ceramic types, various dating, etc.).
BK21972. De l'archéologie à l'histoire, Lampes antiques du Bilad es Sham, 2011, in French, 435 pages, soft cover, new in original packaging, international shipping at actual cost of shipping; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00


Die Lampen aus den romischen Topfereien von Frankfurt am Main-Nied

|Oil| |Lamps|, |Die| |Lampen| |aus| |den| |romischen| |Topfereien| |von| |Frankfurt| |am| |Main-Nied|
This work offers a study on the model types of lamps of Roman pottery from the Frankfurt-Nied museum, with dating as well as an evaluation on the signature pieces of this group of artifacts, whose main area of distribution was in the Rhine-Main region. An analysis of the clay proves that the factory lamps as well as the various red-painted lamps in the Wetterauer wares collection originated from a collaborative workshop.
BK21975. Die Lampen aus den romischen Topfereien von Frankfurt am Main-Nied by Ingeborg Huld-Zetsche, 2014, hardcover, new in original packing, international shipping at cost; $45.00 SALE PRICE $40.50


Ancient Lamps

|Oil| |Lamps|, |Ancient| |Lamps|
 
BK21976. Ancient Lamps by Tihamer Szentleleky, 1969, 158 pages, 74 plates, hardcover, used, cover wear, musty, international shipping at actual cost of shipping; $45.00 SALE PRICE $40.50


Roman-Byzantine, Syro-Palestinian, Glass Dropper Flask, c. Late 1st - Early 5th Century A.D.

|Glass| |Antiquities|, |Roman-Byzantine,| |Syro-Palestinian,| |Glass| |Dropper| |Flask,| |c.| |Late| |1st| |-| |Early| |5th| |Century| |A.D.|
Thick enamel-like weathering, as seen on this piece, is common on glass found in the Levant and this piece is certainly from the Levante. This flask is, however, a bit of a mystery. There is nothing very similar in the large library of ancient and medieval glass references held by Forum. It resembles an aryballos, but lacks the handles which define that type. It probably was used like an aryballos, to store and dispense scented oil which was rubbed on the skin and then scraped off to clean the body. The date is uncertain. Weathering obscures the original color, making another mystery, but the only other a similar flasks we know are described as opaque black glass.
AG20822. Isings -, et al. -; apparently unpublished but two similar pieces are known from the market (priced $2,500 - $3,000!), Choice, complete and intact, thick tan and brown enamel-like weathering, dropper flask, free-blown, amber(?) glass, 12.0 cm (4 3/4") tall, 8.5 cm maximum diameter, piriform body, very short narrow neck, broad flat folded in rim, round bottom with large pontil mark, not designed to stand on its own, attractive clear plexiglass three prong stand included; from the collection of Alex G. Malloy, former dealer in antiquities for 40 years; very rare form; $540.00 SALE PRICE $486.00











Catalog current as of Friday, January 28, 2022.
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