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Hellenistic Greek, Bronze Relief Ring Fragment, Anatolia, 3rd - 2nd Century B.C.

|Jewelry|, |Hellenistic| |Greek,| |Bronze| |Relief| |Ring| |Fragment,| |Anatolia,| |3rd| |-| |2nd| |Century| |B.C.|NEW
This bronze ring fragment is nearly identical to the referenced the ring fragment currently in The J. Paul Getty Museum in Malibu, California, listed in Spier Rings, as shown to the right. It is clearly the same woman depicted and they are very likely from the same engraver and workshop. The Getty Museum piece is similarly missing almost the entire hoop. In fact, all known examples of this ring type are broken in this same manner. Perhaps wearing the ring indicated the wearer had the authority of the queen and these rings were officially recalled and made unwearable when this authority expired.ring fragment
AS97567. Spier Rings 90 (nearly identical fragment!, bezel 21.1 x 17.3 x 4.5 mm), fragment, entire bezel present, only traces of the hoop remain, rough green patina, scratches, some corrosion, earthen deposits, bezel 21 x 16.7 x 8.6 mm, high relief portrait of a woman facing left (perhaps a Ptolemaic queen), draped and wearing her hair in melon coiffure; $350.00 (287.00)


Roman, Bronze Ring-Key, 2nd - 4th Century A.D.

|Jewelry|, |Roman,| |Bronze| |Ring-Key,| |2nd| |-| |4th| |Century| |A.D.|
Roman ring-keys were usually worn on belt or string, or carried in a purse, not worn on the finger, and were usually used to open a strongbox or cabinet. Roman ring keys were made of bronze, brass or iron. Pollio notes many ring-keys identified as Roman [in online sales] are actually medieval and replicas and fakes exist. This is, of course, a genuine Roman era specimen.
AS79097. Milovanivic-Mrdjic type II/1, fig. 6 & pl. 2, 36; Guiraud type 5a; Pollio p. 63, complete and intact, rough corrosion, Roman bronze ring-key, 32mm maximum length; $80.00 (65.60)


Lot of 100 Bronze Ancient Trilobate Arrowheads, Hellenistic - Byzantine, c. 300 B.C. - 1000 A.D.

|Metal| |Arrowheads|, |Lot| |of| |100| |Bronze| |Ancient| |Trilobate| |Arrowheads,| |Hellenistic| |-| |Byzantine,| |c.| |300| |B.C.| |-| |1000| |A.D.|
 
LT96894. Lot of 100 bronze trilobate arrowheads, mostly or all Hellenistic - Byzantine, c. 300 B.C. - 1000 A.D., c. 12 - 28 mm, some complete and intact, some with chips or bends, unattributed to type, no tags, from the same larger lot as the arrowheads in the photograph, as-is, no returns; $500.00 (410.00)


Lot of 100 Bronze Ancient Trilobate Arrowheads, Hellenistic - Byzantine, c. 300 B.C. - 1000 A.D.

|Metal| |Arrowheads|, |Lot| |of| |100| |Bronze| |Ancient| |Trilobate| |Arrowheads,| |Hellenistic| |-| |Byzantine,| |c.| |300| |B.C.| |-| |1000| |A.D.|
LT96895. Lot of 100 bronze trilobate arrowheads, mostly or all Hellenistic - Byzantine, c. 300 B.C. - 1000 A.D., c. 12 - 28 mm, some complete and intact, some with chips or bends, unattributed to type, no tags, from the same larger lot as the arrowheads in the photograph, as-is, no returns; $500.00 (410.00)


Roman-Byzantine, Bronze Disk Nomisma(?) Weight, c. 350 - 650 A.D.

|Weights| |&| |Scales|, |Roman-Byzantine,| |Bronze| |Disk| |Nomisma(?)| |Weight,| |c.| |350| |-| |650| |A.D.|
Concentric circles disk weights are not rare, but they are still not well classified or understood. The flans are cast or made from coins. The concentric rings or circles on the face can be cast or turned. The back is often flat, sometimes with evidence of filing and sometimes with scratches from use. Grooves on the reverse may have been used to adjust the weight. Whether the number of rings represents a kind of coding for the indication of weight has been a subject of discussion but the answer is unresolved. They are often described as game pieces but that is unlikely, even if the same shapes carved from bone have been proven to be Roman game pieces.
MA96723. cf. Weber Byzantinische 127, Hendin Weights -, weight 4.285 g, maximum diameter 16.46 mm, die axis 0o, obverse concentric circles around a central depression (appear to be lathe cut); reverse single groove across the diameter; $45.00 (36.90)


Lot of 12 Roman Republic Lead Glans Sling-Bullets, 1st Century B.C.

|Lead| |Glandes| |Sling| |Bullets|, |Lot| |of| |12| |Roman| |Republic| |Lead| |Glans| |Sling-Bullets,| |1st| |Century| |B.C.|
According to the contemporary report of Vegatius, Republican slingers had an accurate range of up to six hundred feet. The best sling ammunition was cast from lead. For a given mass, lead, being very dense, offered the minimum size and therefore minimum air resistance. Also, lead sling-bullets were small and difficult to see in flight. In some cases, the lead would be cast in a simple open mold made by pushing a finger, thumb, or sharpened stick into sand and pouring molten metal into the hole. The flat top end could later be carved to a matching shape. More frequently, they were cast in two-part molds. Sling-bullets were made in a variety of shapes including an ellipsoidal form closely resembling an acorn; possibly the origin of the Latin word for lead sling-bullet: glandes plumbeae (literally leaden acorns) or simply glandes (meaning acorns, singular glans). The most common shape by far was biconical, resembling the shape of an almond or an American football. Why the almond shape was favored is unknown. Possibly there was some aerodynamic advantage, but it seems equally likely that there was a more prosaic reason, such as the shape being easy to extract from a mold, or that it will rest in a sling cradle with little danger of rolling out. Almond-shaped lead sling-bullets were typically about 35 millimeters (1.4 in) long and about 20 millimeters (0.8 in) wide.
LT96131. Lot of 12 large almond shape lead sling bullets, c. 50g, 33 - 44mm long, workshop made, cast in a two part mold, found in Spain, the actual sling bullets in the photo; $240.00 (196.80)


Byzantine, Holyland (Northern Israel or Jordan), Beit Natif Related Pottery Lamp, c. 400 - 500 A.D.

|Oil| |Lamps|, |Byzantine,| |Holyland| |(Northern| |Israel| |or| |Jordan),| |Beit| |Natif| |Related| |Pottery| |Lamp,| |c.| |400| |-| |500| |A.D.|
This lamp, from northern Israel or Jordan, is a locally made copy of the Beit Natif type. Beit Natif, in southern Israel, is the site of the primary workshop where the prototype "Beit Natif" Judaean lamps were made. This lamp and Beit Natif lamps typically have a round body, a small handle, and the sides of the nozzle are sightly convex (bow-shaped) with a narrow rim around its shoulder that is pinched to strengthen the impression that the sides are convex.
AL93944. Adler type 6.2, BN.6; cf. Alder 953, Warschaw 388, Qedem 8 -; 8.3 cm (3 1/4") long, near Choice, a few small chips, pin head size hole at tip of nozzle and another below handle, ornamentation worn, c. 400 - 500 A.D.; mould-made, pink clay, sides of nozzle are slightly convex, rims on the nozzle shoulder with scroll on each end, decorations on top of nozzle obscure but perhaps grapes, double rim around large filling hole, tongue shaped handle rising diagonally ornamented with four vertical bands, radiating bands on shoulders of body, slight ring base; $110.00 (90.20)


Ancient Near Eastern Cylinder Seals, From the Marcopoli Collection

|Antiquities| |Books|, |Ancient| |Near| |Eastern| |Cylinder| |Seals,| |From| |the| |Marcopoli| |Collection|
Ex Libris Alex G. Malloy
BK21982. Ancient Near Eastern Cylinder Seals, From the Marcopoli Collection by Beatrice Teissier, 407 pages, 643 seals, illustrated, hardcover, dust cover wear, international shipping at actual cost of shipping; $350.00 (287.00)


Late Roman - Byzantine, Holyland (Syro-Palestinian), Bi-Lanceolate Pottery Oil Lamp, c. 300 - 500 A.D.

|Oil| |Lamps|, |Late| |Roman| |-| |Byzantine,| |Holyland| |(Syro-Palestinian),| |Bi-Lanceolate| |Pottery| |Oil| |Lamp,| |c.| |300| |-| |500| |A.D.|
Adler notes these lamps are found throughout the northern part of Israel, especially in Beit Shean and Hamat Gader, and date to the fourth and fifth centuries. At this time, Beit Shean, was primarily Christian, but evidence of Jewish habitation and a Samaritan synagogue indicate established minority communities. Hamat Gader was already a well known health and recreation site in Roman times, mentioned in Strabo, Origen and Eunapius, as well as the Rabbinic literature. Construction of the bath complex began in the 2nd century by the 10th Roman Legion, which was garrisoned in nearby Gadara (modern Umm Qais). The ancient Hebrew name means hot springs of (the ancient city of) Gadara. The Arabic name El-Hamma preserves this, and the name of the tel located near the site, Tel Bani, is a corruption of the Latin word meaning "baths." The empress Aelia Eudocia composed a poem praising the qualities of the multiple springs which was inscribed so that visitors could see it as they went into the pool. The photo to the right is of the ancient Roman baths. Click the photo to see a larger image.Hammat Gader Baths
AL93918. Bi-lanceolate pottery oil lamp; Adler Collection (website) type N2; 8.0 cm (3 1/8") long, near Choice, complete and intact, light encrustation, wear, c. 300 - 500 A.D.; pink-buff clay, mold made with incised decoration, the body includes the entire lamp from tip of nozzle to tip of "tongue" handle, wide rim surrounds a large fill hole, incised herring-bone geometric wreath pattern on narrow convex shoulders, two incised lengthwise lines on the handle, incised lines between fill hold rim and nozzle; bi-lanceolate oil lamp BETTER condition than the lamp in the photo, limit one per customer please; $80.00 (65.60)


Byzantine, Holyland (Northern Israel or Jordan), Beit Natif Related Pottery Lamp, c. 500 - 550 A.D.

|Oil| |Lamps|, |Byzantine,| |Holyland| |(Northern| |Israel| |or| |Jordan),| |Beit| |Natif| |Related| |Pottery| |Lamp,| |c.| |500| |-| |550| |A.D.|
This lamp, from northern Israel or Jordan, is a locally made copy of the Beit Natif type. Beit Natif, in southern Israel, is the site of the primary workshop where the prototype "Beit Natif" Judaean lamps were made. This lamp and Beit Natif lamps typically have a round body, a small handle, and the sides of the nozzle are sightly convex (bow-shaped) with a narrow rim around its shoulder that is pinched to strengthen the impression that the sides are convex. The flat ended nozzle is a 6th century characteristic, normally associated with a conical handle. This lamp has the earlier tongue shaped handle style, suggesting it is an early example of Adler type BN.7.
AL93932. Adler type 6.2, BN.7; cf. Alder 960, Qedem 8 515 (conical handle); 8.3 cm (3 1/4") long, near Choice, intact, some surface flaking, small cracks, c. 500 - 550 A.D.; mould-made, buff clay, trace of cream slip, the nozzle ends in almost a straight line, rim on shoulder of nozzle pinched to create the impression the sides are convex, decorations on nozzle obscure, double rim around large filling hole, tongue shaped handle rising diagonally ornamented with three vertical bands, radiating bands on shoulders of body, slight ring base; $110.00 (90.20)











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