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Byzantine, Holyland (Northern Israel or Jordan), Beit Natif Related Pottery Lamp, c. 400 - 500 A.D.

|Oil| |Lamps|, |Byzantine,| |Holyland| |(Northern| |Israel| |or| |Jordan),| |Beit| |Natif| |Related| |Pottery| |Lamp,| |c.| |400| |-| |500| |A.D.|
This lamp, from northern Israel or Jordan, is a locally made copy of the Beit Natif type. Beit Natif, in southern Israel, is the site of the primary workshop where the prototype "Beit Natif" Judaean lamps were made. This lamp and Beit Natif lamps typically have a round body, a small handle, and the sides of the nozzle are sightly convex (bow-shaped) with a narrow rim around its shoulder that is pinched to strengthen the impression that the sides are convex.
AL93944. Adler type 6.2, BN.6; cf. Alder 953, Warschaw 388, Qedem 8 -; 8.3 cm (3 1/4") long, near Choice, a few small chips, pin head size hole at tip of nozzle and another below handle, ornamentation worn, c. 400 - 500 A.D.; mould-made, pink clay, sides of nozzle are slightly convex, rims on the nozzle shoulder with scroll on each end, decorations on top of nozzle obscure but perhaps grapes, double rim around large filling hole, tongue shaped handle rising diagonally ornamented with four vertical bands, radiating bands on shoulders of body, slight ring base; $110.00 (€101.20)


Ancient Near Eastern Cylinder Seals, From the Marcopoli Collection

|Antiquities| |Books|, |Ancient| |Near| |Eastern| |Cylinder| |Seals,| |From| |the| |Marcopoli| |Collection|
Ex Libris Alex G. Malloy
BK21982. Ancient Near Eastern Cylinder Seals, From the Marcopoli Collection by Beatrice Teissier, 407 pages, 643 seals, illustrated, hardcover, dust cover wear, international shipping at actual cost of shipping; $350.00 (€322.00)


Late Roman - Byzantine, Holyland (Syro-Palestinian), Bi-Lanceolate Pottery Oil Lamp, c. 300 - 500 A.D.

|Oil| |Lamps|, |Late| |Roman| |-| |Byzantine,| |Holyland| |(Syro-Palestinian),| |Bi-Lanceolate| |Pottery| |Oil| |Lamp,| |c.| |300| |-| |500| |A.D.|
Adler notes these lamps are found throughout the northern part of Israel, especially in Beit Shean and Hamat Gader, and date to the fourth and fifth centuries. At this time, Beit Shean, was primarily Christian, but evidence of Jewish habitation and a Samaritan synagogue indicate established minority communities. Hamat Gader was already a well known health and recreation site in Roman times, mentioned in Strabo, Origen and Eunapius, as well as the Rabbinic literature. Construction of the bath complex began in the 2nd century by the 10th Roman Legion, which was garrisoned in nearby Gadara (modern Umm Qais). The ancient Hebrew name means hot springs of (the ancient city of) Gadara. The Arabic name El-Hamma preserves this, and the name of the tel located near the site, Tel Bani, is a corruption of the Latin word meaning "baths." The empress Aelia Eudocia composed a poem praising the qualities of the multiple springs which was inscribed so that visitors could see it as they went into the pool. The photo to the right is of the ancient Roman baths. Click the photo to see a larger image.Hammat Gader Baths
AL93918. Bi-lanceolate pottery oil lamp; Adler Collection (website) type N2; 8.0 cm (3 1/8") long, near Choice, complete and intact, light encrustation, wear, c. 300 - 500 A.D.; pink-buff clay, mold made with incised decoration, the body includes the entire lamp from tip of nozzle to tip of "tongue" handle, wide rim surrounds a large fill hole, incised herring-bone geometric wreath pattern on narrow convex shoulders, two incised lengthwise lines on the handle, incised lines between fill hold rim and nozzle; bi-lanceolate oil lamp BETTER condition than the lamp in the photo, limit one per customer please; $80.00 (€73.60)


Byzantine, Holyland (Northern Israel or Jordan), Beit Natif Related Pottery Lamp, c. 500 - 550 A.D.

|Oil| |Lamps|, |Byzantine,| |Holyland| |(Northern| |Israel| |or| |Jordan),| |Beit| |Natif| |Related| |Pottery| |Lamp,| |c.| |500| |-| |550| |A.D.|
This lamp, from northern Israel or Jordan, is a locally made copy of the Beit Natif type. Beit Natif, in southern Israel, is the site of the primary workshop where the prototype "Beit Natif" Judaean lamps were made. This lamp and Beit Natif lamps typically have a round body, a small handle, and the sides of the nozzle are sightly convex (bow-shaped) with a narrow rim around its shoulder that is pinched to strengthen the impression that the sides are convex. The flat ended nozzle is a 6th century characteristic, normally associated with a conical handle. This lamp has the earlier tongue shaped handle style, suggesting it is an early example of Adler type BN.7.
AL93932. Adler type 6.2, BN.7; cf. Alder 960, Qedem 8 515 (conical handle); 8.3 cm (3 1/4") long, near Choice, intact, some surface flaking, small cracks, c. 500 - 550 A.D.; mould-made, buff clay, trace of cream slip, the nozzle ends in almost a straight line, rim on shoulder of nozzle pinched to create the impression the sides are convex, decorations on nozzle obscure, double rim around large filling hole, tongue shaped handle rising diagonally ornamented with three vertical bands, radiating bands on shoulders of body, slight ring base; $110.00 (€101.20)


De l'archéologie à l'histoire, Lampes antiques du Bilad es Sham : Jordanie, Syrie, Liban, Palestine

|Oil| |Lamps|, |De| |l'archéologie| |à| |l'histoire,| |Lampes| |antiques| |du| |Bilad| |es| |Sham| |:| |Jordanie,| |Syrie,| |Liban,| |Palestine|
The colloquium that took place in the autumn of 2005 both in Amman and in the sumptuous site of Petra had the objective of bringing together researchers from more than thirty countries, with the theme of "ancient lamps" of the Middle East, Jordan, Lebanon and Syria. From an archaeological point of view, it was an unprecedented initiative: to bring together the best specialists of the region by asking them to attach themselves to a common but often neglected type of material, in order to present the most recent results of their research, both the lamps themselves and the contexts in which they had been discovered (stratigraphy, ceramic types, various dating, etc.).
BK21972. De l'archéologie à l'histoire, Lampes antiques du Bilad es Sham, 2011, in French, 435 pages, soft cover, new in original packaging, international shipping at actual cost of shipping; $90.00 (€82.80)


Die Lampen aus den romischen Topfereien von Frankfurt am Main-Nied

|Oil| |Lamps|, |Die| |Lampen| |aus| |den| |romischen| |Topfereien| |von| |Frankfurt| |am| |Main-Nied|
This work offers a study on the model types of lamps of Roman pottery from the Frankfurt-Nied museum, with dating as well as an evaluation on the signature pieces of this group of artifacts, whose main area of distribution was in the Rhine-Main region. An analysis of the clay proves that the factory lamps as well as the various red-painted lamps in the Wetterauer wares collection originated from a collaborative workshop.
BK21975. Die Lampen aus den romischen Topfereien von Frankfurt am Main-Nied by Ingeborg Huld-Zetsche, 2014, hardcover, new in original packing, international shipping at cost; $45.00 (€41.40)


Ancient Lamps

|Oil| |Lamps|, |Ancient| |Lamps|
 
BK21976. Ancient Lamps by Tihamer Szentleleky, 1969, 158 pages, 74 plates, hardcover, used, cover wear, musty, international shipping at actual cost of shipping; $45.00 (€41.40)


Iberia, Hacksilver, Solid Lunate Earring, c. 650 - 150 B.C.

|Iberia|, |Iberia,| |Hacksilver,| |Solid| |Lunate| |Earring,| |c.| |650| |-| |150| |B.C.||Ring| |Money|
The lunate earring type, characterized by a solid crescentric body in a tapered bent over hoop, is the most basic and popular form of earring found in Bronze and Iron Age contexts. The earliest know were found at Ur and date to the third millennium B.C. They are very often found in hacksilver hoards, indicating that they were a bullion medium of exchange. The referenced examples and others known to Forum are all from the East and are under 2 grams. This much larger and heavier example was found in Iberia. Perhaps it was produced locally or perhaps it was brought to the region by Phoenician trade.
CE96102. Silver Ring Money, cf. Gitler Hacksilber 24 ff. (Samaria, late 4th c. B.C.); Golani-Sass Fig. 10, 1 - 2 (Tel Miqne-Ekron, Canaan, 7th c. B.C.) , weight 7.044 g, maximum diameter 31.0 mm, solid silver, crescentric body in a tapered bent over hoop; ex Moneta Numismatic Services; photos are of both sides, ONE earring; $160.00 (€147.20)


Roman - Byzantine, Italy, Bronze Acorn Steelyard Pendant Weight, c. 1st to 7th century A.D.

|Weights| |&| |Scales|, |Roman| |-| |Byzantine,| |Italy,| |Bronze| |Acorn| |Steelyard| |Pendant| |Weight,| |c.| |1st| |to| |7th| |century| |A.D.||weight|
Steelyards with acorn shaped counterweights were in use from the 1st century A.D. to the late Roman and Byzantine times. This weight is close to a very light Byzantine pound (285g) (cf. Ballance et al. 1989, 134). See Waclawik, M. "A bronze steelyard with an acorn-shaped counterweight from the Paphos Agora" in Studies in Art and Civilization 20 (Krakow, 2016) (PDF Available) for a similar but larger (405.5g) acorn weight and steelyard. The article notes that another similar scale and acorn weight was found at Pompeii.
LT96147. Bronze weight, Romano-Byzantine acorn steelyard pendant weight, 280.7g, 62mm tall, 33mm maximum diameter, part of loop missing otherwise complete and intact, light corrosion, light encrustation, $270.00 (€248.40)


Caesarea Maritima, Judaea / Syria Palaestina, 1st - 3rd Century A.D., Lead Half Italian Litra Weight

|Weights| |&| |Scales|, |Caesarea| |Maritima,| |Judaea| |/| |Syria| |Palaestina,| |1st| |-| |3rd| |Century| |A.D.,| |Lead| |Half| |Italian| |Litra| |Weight|
A nearly identical specimen, from the same mold, was found near Caesarea Maritima in 1949 and is listed in the Corpus Inscriptionum Iudaeae/Palaestinae, Vol. II, Ameling, Cotton, Eck, et.al. on page 621. According to the authors, in Judaea, the term "litra" derived from the Roman word "libra" came to indicate local weight standards between the 1st and 2nd centuries CE. Therefore the word Iταλικη (Italica) was added whenever the Roman standard was intended. This weight is inscribed to indicate it is half an Italian litra. It is about 8 grams short of the standard but it probably originally had an handle attached that would have made it close to the appropriate weight. Around the end of the 3rd century CE, local standards were replaced entirely by the Roman system and the descriptive word Iταλικη was no longer necessary.
AS96251. Corpus Inscriptionum Iudaeae/Palaestinae, Vol. II, p. 621 (nearly identical specimen from the same mold), VF, roughly oval shape, probably missing handle at the top, weight 153.5 g, maximum diameter 87x43 mm, obverse ITA/ΛIK/H H/MI Λ/ITPA (half an Italian litra) in six lines; reverse blank; from The Jimi Berlin Caesarea Collection; surface find 1974 Caesarea Maritima; very rare; $540.00 (€496.80)











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