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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Antiquities| ▸ |Holy Land Antiquities||View Options:  |  |  |   

Holy Land Antiquities

The Holy Land, also called the Syro-Palestinian region includes ancient Judaea and Palestine, and parts of ancient Phoenicia, Syria, and Arabia.

Kingdom of Israel, Samaria, Blackware Pyxis, 10th - Late 8th Century BCE

|Holy| |Land| |Antiquities|, |Kingdom| |of| |Israel,| |Samaria,| |Blackware| |Pyxis,| |10th| |-| |Late| |8th| |Century| |BCE|
Ancient Samaria is mentioned in the Bible as the capital of the northern Kingdom of Israel. Samaria was destroyed in 721 BCE, when the Kingdom of Israel fell to the Assyrians, and its people were taken to a foreign land as captives. The city was settled by the Macedonians during the Hellenistic period, but was again destroyed in 108 BCE by the Hasmonean king John Hyrcanus. Augustus gave Herod the Great the city in 30 BCE. In honor of the emperor, Herod revived the city and renamed it Sebaste (Greek for Augustus).
AA99532. Kingdom of Israel, black pyxis; Zayadine pl. LXIII, 2 & fig. 7, 12 (Samaria); cf. Amiran p. 262, photo 255, Choice, complete and intact, surface bumps and marks, earthen deposits; 7.2cm (2 3/4") tall, 7.3cm (2 7/8") maximum diameter, 10th - Late 8th Century BCE; rounded rim, very slightly everted mouth, short cylindrical neck, spherical body, two pierced horizontal lug handles, vertical burnishing, no base; used for cosmetics; ex Bruce Munday (Australia, 2017); scarcer then the juglets; $300.00 SALE PRICE $270.00


Canaanite, Tell El Yahudiyeh Ware, Piriform Juglet, c. 1750 - 1550 B.C.

|Holy| |Land| |Antiquities|, |Canaanite,| |Tell| |El| |Yahudiyeh| |Ware,| |Piriform| |Juglet,| |c.| |1750| |-| |1550| |B.C.|
Vessels of this type are called Tell el-Yahudiyeh Ware, named for the site in Egypt were they were first identified by Flinders Petrie. Despite the name, it is now believed that the earliest and most specimens, mostly juglets, were made by Canaanites in what is now Israel and Jordan. They were likely used for perfumed oils. Tell el-Yahudiyeh Ware is covered with a very dark grey-brown, almost black, burnished slip. The decoration is incised and pricked, and the resulting lines and holes are filled with white chalk to contrast with the vessel's surface. The specimens in Kaplan with the form, size, and decoration, most similar to our juglet were found at Jericho, Beth Shemesh, and Amman.
AA99531. Canaanite juglet; cf. Kaplan, piriform type 3, figs. 74a (form) & fig. 75a (decoration); Amiran pl. 36, 9 (different decoration), Choice, complete and intact, finely made, with elegant style, tiny chips in the rim and base; 15cm (6") tall, 10cm (4") maximum diameter; dark grey (Munsell color 5YR 4/1) slip, reverse everted rim, grooved strap handle from rim to the shoulder, narrow neck, inscribed decoration on shoulder - a band defined by two horizontal lines connected by dotted (pricked) vertical lines, piriform body, small ring base; ex Mera Antiq (Yossi Eilon, Tel Aviv), found in Israel; $1500.00 SALE PRICE $1350.00


Roman Judaea - Syria Palestina, Galilee, Kefar Hananya Ware, Kedera Cooking Pot, 1st - Early 5th Century A.D.

|Holy| |Land| |Antiquities|, |Roman| |Judaea| |-| |Syria| |Palestina,| |Galilee,| |Kefar| |Hananya| |Ware,| |Kedera| |Cooking| |Pot,| |1st| |-| |Early| |5th| |Century| |A.D.|
"The pots from Kefar Sihin and Kefar Hananya do not usually break." -- Rabbi Yossi, Babylonian Talmud, Shabbat 120b

Kefar Hananya was best known for production of cooking pots characterized by red-brown clay, distinctive ribbing or wheel-ridging on the body of the vessel and two handles for placing and removing the pot from the fire. Production of these cooking pots at Kefar Hananya began around 50 CE and extended to at least 430 CE. Wide-mouthed pots, most of which did not have handles (lifsa), were common in the first century BCE but began to be surpassed by the smaller-mouthed, handled cooking pot (kedera) in the first century CE.
AA99541. Judaean, kedera cooking pot, Adan-Bayewitz type 4E2 (simple rim variant), Crook fig. 4, Choice, complete and intact, two small rim chips; 14.0cm tall, 20.5cm diameter, predominantly reddish brown (Munsell color 2.5YR 5/8), some grayed areas, few white chalk grits, thin walls as typical, probably 4th century A.D.; simple rim, cylindrical neck, two strap handles from rim to shoulder, globular body with greatest diameter near the middle, wheel-ridged body and shoulder; base slightly pointed, ex Archaeological Center (Robert Deutsch, Tel Aviv, Israel, 16 Apr 2015), with photocopy of Israel Antiquities Authority export approval certificate; $1400.00 SALE PRICE $1260.00


Roman Judaea - Syria Palestina, Galilee, Kefar Hananya Ware, Kedera Cooking Pot, 1st - Early 5th Century A.D.

|Holy| |Land| |Antiquities|, |Roman| |Judaea| |-| |Syria| |Palestina,| |Galilee,| |Kefar| |Hananya| |Ware,| |Kedera| |Cooking| |Pot,| |1st| |-| |Early| |5th| |Century| |A.D.|
"The pots from Kefar Sihin and Kefar Hananya do not usually break." -- Rabbi Yossi, Babylonian Talmud, Shabbat 120b

Kefar Hananya was best known for production of cooking pots characterized by red-brown clay, distinctive ribbing or wheel-ridging on the body of the vessel and two handles for placing and removing the pot from the fire. Production of these cooking pots at Kefar Hananya began around 50 CE and extended to at least 430 CE. Wide-mouthed pots, most of which did not have handles (lifsa), were common in the first century BCE but began to be surpassed by the smaller-mouthed, handled cooking pot (kedera) in the first century CE.
AA99526. Judaean, kedera cooking pot, Adan-Bayewitz type 4E1 (variant with ridge below lip), Choice, complete and intact; 11.0cm tall, 12.5cm diameter, predominantly reddish brown (Munsell color 2.5YR 5/6), some grayed areas, few white chalk grits, light encrustations, thin walls as typical, probably early 4th - early 5th century A.D.; exterior ridge below the lip, cylindrical neck, two strap handles from rim to shoulder, globular body with greatest diameter near the middle, wheel-ridged body and shoulder; base slightly pointed, ex Archaeological Center (Robert Deutsch, Tel Aviv, Israel, 16 Apr 2015), with photocopy of Israel Antiquities Authority export approval certificate; $1400.00 SALE PRICE $1260.00


Kingdom of Judaea, First Temple Period, Pottery Wine Decanter or Beer Jug, 800 - 586 B.C.

|Holy| |Land| |Antiquities|, |Kingdom| |of| |Judaea,| |First| |Temple| |Period,| |Pottery| |Wine| |Decanter| |or| |Beer| |Jug,| |800| |-| |586| |B.C.|
This decanter form is the typical of the type unique to the Kingdom of Judaea during the First Temple Period. Historians debate what liquid this type of vessel would have contained. Wine seems likely, and decanter engraved with the word "wine" was recovered in excavations at the biblical Tel Lachish. Some, however, describe this decanter type as a beer jug!
AA99540. Kingdom of Judaea, Decanter; Gitin I, p. 362, 3.3.7.2; Lachish V pl. 24, 11 & pl. 49, 6; Tushingham fig. 2, 11, Choice, complete and intact, 23cm (9 1/8") tall, 14cm (5 1/2") diameter, Iron Age IIB - IIC, 800 - 586 B.C.; well shaped, wheel made, pink-orange clay, conical mouth, rounded rim, conical neck, strap handle from the neck to the shoulder, broad sloping shoulder with carinated edge, sack shaped body, ring base; ex Mera Antiq (Yossi Eilon) Tel Aviv, found in Israel; $2400.00 SALE PRICE $2160.00


Judaea, Terracotta Pottery Four-Horned Votive Altar, c. 1st - 2nd Century A.D.

|Holy| |Land| |Antiquities|, |Judaea,| |Terracotta| |Pottery| |Four-Horned| |Votive| |Altar,| |c.| |1st| |-| |2nd| |Century| |A.D.|
The book of Exodus relates that God gave Moses instructions..."You shall make the altar...five cubits long and five cubits widethe altar is to be squareand three cubits high. Make its horns on the four corners, the horns to be of one piece with it." Smaller four-horned pottery altars found in Israel date back to at least as early as the 10th Century B.C. (Dayagi-Mendels, p. 65). Our altar was probably intended as a votive gift to be filled with incense and left burning at a temple or shrine.
AA99528. Terracotta pottery four-horned votive altar, Choice, complete and intact, small surface only crack in interior, light encrustations, 14.5cm (5 3/4") tall, 9.3cm (3 5/8") maximum width, c. 1st - 2nd Century A.D.; buff-pinkish-white clay (Munsell color 7.5YR 8/2), four horned altar: W-shaped cut on each of the four sides of the square mouth, a cylindrical column body, square stepped base with 4 legs; ex Archaeological Center (Robert Deutsch, Tel Aviv, Israel), auction 65 (27 Sep 2018), lot 472; ex S.M. Collection (Herzliya Pituah, Israel); very rare; $2400.00 SALE PRICE $2160.00


Judah, Bronze Dome Weight (13.649g), c. 800 - 586 B.C.

|Weights| |&| |Scales|, |Judah,| |Bronze| |Dome| |Weight| |(13.649g),| |c.| |800| |-| |586| |B.C.|
 
AS111503. Judah, bronze dome weight, cf. Hendin Weights 222 (12.24g, 1 shekel), Hecht A -, Kletter 1998 -, Tushingham -, Choice, 13.649g, 15.2mm diameter, pre-exile, c. 800 - 586 B.C.; spherical bronze weight with a flat bottom, unmarked; ex Archaeological Center (Robert Deutsch, Tel Aviv, Israel, 2012); $300.00 SALE PRICE $270.00


Judah, Haematite Dome Weight (6.402g), c. 800 - 586 B.C.

|Weights| |&| |Scales|, |Judah,| |Haematite| |Dome| |Weight| |(6.402g),| |c.| |800| |-| |586| |B.C.|
Haematite is a black iron ore that is often red from oxidized iron on the surface.
AS111505. Judah, Haematite dome weight, Tushingham 7 (very similar, 6.51g); Hendin Weights 106 (polished, 7.71g), Hecht A -, Kletter 1998 -, Choice, 6.402g, 18.3mm diameter, 14.3mm high, pre-exile, c. 800 - 586 B.C.; rough unfinished surface, red oxidized surface; very rare; $150.00 SALE PRICE $135.00


Judah, Limestone Dome Weight, 4 Shekels (39.751g), c. 800 - 586 B.C.

|Weights| |&| |Scales|, |Judah,| |Limestone| |Dome| |Weight,| |4| |Shekels| |(39.751g),| |c.| |800| |-| |586| |B.C.|
This is a pre-exile limestone weight from Judah. Lead weights apparently were not used in Jerusalem. Ronny Reich in "Stone Scale Weights of the Late Second Temple Period from the Jewish Quarter," concludes that the Jerusalemites used limestone weights instead of lead for reasons of purity, since in Judaism, according to later rabbinical sources, stone does not acquire impurity.
AS111509. Judah, limestone dome weight; cf. Tushingham fig. 78, 27 (42.22g, pink and gray limestone); Hendin Weights 198 (43.82g, grey limestone), Choice, 39.751g, 27.3mm diameter, underweight, pre-exile, 800 - 586 B.C.; carved creamy white limestone, high dome, flat bottom, unmarked; $500.00 SALE PRICE $450.00


Phoenician, Bronze Trapezoid Cube Weight (Het - 8.644g), c. 7th - 4th Century B.C.

|Weights| |&| |Scales|, |Phoenician,| |Bronze| |Trapezoid| |Cube| |Weight| |(Het| |-| |8.644g),| |c.| |7th| |-| |4th| |Century| |B.C.|
This weight is the usual shape for the type, an inverted truncated pyramid - a cube with the bottom slightly smaller than the top. The type dates from perhaps as early as the the 9th century B.C. to the end of the Persian period. They were undoubtedly used to weigh silver bullion for transactions. They are a common find at Ashkelon in 7th century B.C. contexts, but not often available for sale.
AS111483. Phoenician, bronze cube weight, cf. Kletter 2000 p. 32, 15 - 16 (8.33 - 8.86g), Hendin Weights 248 - 251 (16.81 - 17.77g), Hecht A 53 (3.5g), Choice, 8.644g, 10.0x11.3x10.1mm, c. 7th - 4th Century B.C.; inverted truncated pyramid, incised (Phoenician het) on top, ex Shick Coins (Max Shick, Israel, 2012); $400.00 SALE PRICE $360.00




  






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The list above includes only references specifically dedicated to holy land antiquities. References not included in this list may be identified by clicking on them in the item description or on the Holy Land Antiquities page in NumisWiki.

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