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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Thrace & Moesia| ▸ |Anchialus||View Options:  |  |  | 

Anchialus, Thrace

Anchialos (Pomorie, Bulgaria today) was possibly founded in the 5th or 4th century B.C. as a colony of Apollonia. It is mentioned in Strabo's Geographica as a small town. It was briefly captured by Messembria in the 2nd century B.C., but retaken by Apollonia and its fortified walls destroyed. The western Black Sea coast was conquered by the Romans under Marcus Licinius Crassus in 29 - 28 B.C. after continuous campaigns in the area since 72 - 71. The city became part of the Roman province of Thrace and was formally proclaimed a city under Trajan. Anchialos prospered as the most important import and export location in Thrace during the 2nd and 3rd centuries and acquired the appearance of a Roman city during the Severan Dynasty.

Geta, 209 - c. 26 December 211 A.D., Anchialos, Thrace

|Anchialus|, |Geta,| |209| |-| |c.| |26| |December| |211| |A.D.,| |Anchialos,| |Thrace||4| |assaria|
When the Odrysian kingdom was abolished in 45 A.D., Anchialos (Pomorie, Bulgaria today) became part of the Roman province of Thrace. It was formally proclaimed a city under Trajan. Anchialos thrived in the 2nd and 3rd centuries serving as the most important import and export station of Thrace and acquired the appearance of a Roman city under the Severan Dynasty.
RP68711. Bronze 4 assaria, Varbanov 464 (R5), AMNG II 555, SNG Cop -, BMC Thrace -, Lindgren -, aVF, glossy green patina, weight 14.534 g, maximum diameter 30.7 mm, die axis 45o, Anchialos (Pomorie, Bulgaria) mint, 209 - 212 A.D.; obverse AY K Π CEΠ ΓETAC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse OYΛΠIANΩN AΓ-C-IAΛEΩN, Demeter standing left, reaching with right toward serpent coiled around large torch before her, small torch cradled in her left, two small pellets over ∆ in center field; rare; SOLD


Gordian III and Tranquillina, May 241 - 25 February 244 A.D., Anchialos, Thrace

|Anchialus|, |Gordian| |III| |and| |Tranquillina,| |May| |241| |-| |25| |February| |244| |A.D.,| |Anchialos,| |Thrace||AE| |27|
Anchialos (Pomorie, Bulgaria today) was possibly founded in the 5th or 4th century B.C. as a colony of Apollonia. It is mentioned in Strabo's Geographica as a small town. It was briefly captured by Messembria in the 2nd century B.C., but retaken by Apollonia and its fortified walls destroyed. The western Black Sea coast was conquered by the Romans under Marcus Licinius Crassus in 29 - 28 B.C. after continuous campaigns in the area since 72 - 71. The city became part of the Roman province of Thrace and was formally proclaimed a city under Trajan. Anchialos prospered as the most important import and export location in Thrace during the 2nd and 3rd centuries and acquired the appearance of a Roman city during the Severan Dynasty.
SH38481. Bronze AE 27, Varbanov II 699, VF, weight 11.482 g, maximum diameter 26.6 mm, die axis 0o, Anchialos (Pomorie, Bulgaria) mint, May 241 - 25 Feb 244 A.D.; obverse AYT K M ANT ΓOP∆IANOC AYΓCEB TPANKYΛΛINA, confronted busts of Gordian on left, laureate, draped, and cuirassed, and Tranquillina on right, draped and wearing stephane; reverse OYΛΠIANWN AΓXIAΛEWN, galley under sail left, containing five crew members, hull decorated with dolphin, fish and octopus right, waves below; SOLD


Gordian III and Tranquillina, May 241 - 25 February 244 A.D., Anchialos, Thrace

|Anchialus|, |Gordian| |III| |and| |Tranquillina,| |May| |241| |-| |25| |February| |244| |A.D.,| |Anchialos,| |Thrace||AE| |27|
Anchialos (Pomorie, Bulgaria today) was possibly founded in the 5th or 4th century B.C. as a colony of Apollonia. It is mentioned in Strabo's Geographica as a small town. It was briefly captured by Messembria in the 2nd century B.C., but retaken by Apollonia and its fortified walls destroyed. The western Black Sea coast was conquered by the Romans under Marcus Licinius Crassus in 29 - 28 B.C. after continuous campaigns in the area since 72 - 71. The city became part of the Roman province of Thrace and was formally proclaimed a city under Trajan. Anchialos prospered as the most important import and export location in Thrace during the 2nd and 3rd centuries and acquired the appearance of a Roman city during the Severan Dynasty.
SH33329. Bronze AE 27, Varbanov II 761, VF, weight 10.640 g, maximum diameter 27.1 mm, die axis 180o, Anchialos (Pomorie, Bulgaria) mint, May 241 - 25 Feb 244 A.D.; obverse AYT K M ANT ΓOP∆IANOC AYΓCAB TPANKYΛΛINA, confronted busts of Gordian on left, laureate, draped, and cuirassed, and Tranquillina on right, draped and wearing stephane; reverse OYΛΠIANWN AΓXIAΛEWN, galley under sail left, containing five crew members, hull decorated with dolphin, fish and octopus right, waves below; SOLD










REFERENCES|

Burnett, A., M. Amandry, et al. Roman Provincial Coinage. (1992 - ).
Corpus Nummorum Thracorum - http://www.corpus-nummorum.eu/
Forrer, L. Descriptive Catalogue of the Collection of Greek Coins formed by Sir Hermann Weber, Vol. II: Macedon, Thrace, Thessaly, Greece. (London, 1924).
Lindgren, H. Ancient Greek Bronze Coins. (Quarryville, 1993).
Lindgren, H. Ancient Greek Bronze Coins: European Mints. (San Mateo, 1989).
Mionnet, T. Description de Médailles antiques grecques et romaines, supplement 2: Thrace. (Paris, 1822).
Moushmov, N. Ancient Coins of the Balkan Peninsula. (1912).
Münzer, F. & M. Strack. Die antiken Münzen von Thrakien, Die antiken Münzen Nord-Griechenlands Vol. II. (Berlin, 1912).
Poole, R. ed. A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Thrace, etc. (London, 1877).
Sear, D. Greek Imperial Coins and Their Values. (London, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 2: Macedonia and Thrace. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, USA, The Collection of the American Numismatic Society, Part 7: Macedonia 1 (Cities, Thraco-Macedonian Tribes, Paeonian kings). (New York, 1987).
Varbanov, I. Greek Imperial Coins And Their Values, Vol. II: Thrace (from Abdera to Pautalia). (Bourgas, Bulgaria, 2005).

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