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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Thrace & Moesia| ▸ |Marcianopolis||View Options:  |  |  | 

Marcianopolis, Moesia Inferior

Renamed by Trajan after his sister, Ulpia Marciana, Marcianopolis was an important strategic center, part of Roman Thrace until c. 190, and then belonged to Moesia inferior. Marcianopolis' prosperity was ended by Gothic raids in 248 and 249, another in 267 or 268, and other barbarian invasions from the north. The city recovered and under Diocletian Marcianopolis became the center of the province Moesia Secunda of the Diocese of Thrace, and was thoroughly rebuilt in the late 3rd and early 4th century. During Valens' conflict with the Goths (366 - 369), Marcianopolis was a temporary capital of the empire and the largest city of Thrace. In 447, it was destroyed by the Huns under Attila, immediately after the bloody Battle of the Utus River. Justinian I restored and fortified it, but it was subject to regular barbarian attacks. An Avar raid finally destroyed it in 614 or 615.

Gordian III and Tranquillina, May 241 - 25 February 244 A.D., Marcianopolis, Moesia Inferior

|Marcianopolis|, |Gordian| |III| |and| |Tranquillina,| |May| |241| |-| |25| |February| |244| |A.D.,| |Marcianopolis,| |Moesia| |Inferior||pentassarion|
Homonoia was the goddess (or spirit or personification) of harmony, concord, unanimity, and oneness of mind. She is usually depicted either seated or standing with a cornucopia.
RP96914. Bronze pentassarion, H-J Marcianopolis 6.38.36.2 (R6), BMC Thrace p 40, 91; Varbanov I 2046 (R3), AMNG I/I 1188, SNG Cop -, VF, obverse off center, flow lines, central depressions, weight 13.543 g, maximum diameter 27.0 mm, die axis 0o, Markianopolis (Devnya, Bulgaria) mint, consular legate Tertullianus, 241 - 244 A.D.; obverse AYT K M ANT ΓOP∆IANOC AYΓ CEB, TPANKIΛΛEINA (her name in exergue), confronted busts of Gordian on left, laureate, draped, and cuirassed, and Tranquillina on right, draped and wearing stephane; reverse YΠ TEPTUΛΛIANOY MAPKIANOΠOΛ,I/T/Ω/N (the last four letters in column in right field), Homonoia standing left, patera in right hand held over flaming altar at feet on left, cornucopia in left hand, E (mark of value) in upper left field; rare; $160.00 (€147.20)
 


Marcianopolis, Moesia Inferior, Pseudo-Autonomous, c. 2nd - 3rd Century A.D.

|Marcianopolis|, |Marcianopolis,| |Moesia| |Inferior,| |Pseudo-Autonomous,| |c.| |2nd| |-| |3rd| |Century| |A.D.||AE| |20|
Renamed by Trajan after his sister, Ulpia Marciana, Marcianopolis was an important strategic center for centuries. The city was repeatedly destroyed by barbarians (Goths, Huns, Avars and others) but was repeatedly rebuilt and prospered. During Valens' conflict with the Goths, it was a temporary capital of the empire and the largest city in Thrace. An Avar raid destroyed the city in 614 or 615.
RL95898. Bronze AE 20, H-J Marcianopolis 6.0.31.4 (R3), AMNG I/I 539, RPC Online VIII U73840 (3 spec.), VF, green patina, uncleaned, encrustation, off center on a broad flan, weight 3.982 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 180o, Markianopolis (Devnya, Bulgaria) mint, c. 2nd - 3rd Century A.D.; obverse MAPKIANO-ΠOΛIC, turreted and draped bust of Tyche right, kalathos on head; reverse MAPKIANO-ΠOΛEITΩN, Cybele enthroned left, wearing kalathos, phiale in right hand, left elbow on tympanum (drum), two lions flanking throne; $45.00 (€41.40)
 


Caracalla and Julia Domna, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D., Marcianopolis, Moesia Inferior

|Marcianopolis|, |Caracalla| |and| |Julia| |Domna,| |28| |January| |198| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.,| |Marcianopolis,| |Moesia| |Inferior||pentassarion|
When Severus died in 211, Julia became the mediator between their two quarreling sons, Caracalla and Geta, who were to rule as joint emperors. Caracalla convinced his mother to call Geta for a reconciliation meeting in her residence. It was a trick. In his mother's house, Caracalla's soldiers attacked and Geta died in their mother's arms. afterward, Julia's relationship with Caracalla was understandably difficult. Nevertheless, she accompanied him on his Parthian campaign in 217. During this trip, Caracalla was assassinated, after which Julia committed suicide. Her body was brought to Rome and she was later deified.
RP54163. Bronze pentassarion, Varbanov I 1007, AMNG I/I 666, aEF, weight 11.786 g, maximum diameter 28.5 mm, die axis 180o, Markianopolis (Devnya, Bulgaria) mint, consular legate Quintilianus, 215 A.D.; obverse ANTΩNINOC AYΓOYCTOC IOYΛIA ∆OMNA, laureate bust of Caracalla right facing draped bust of Julia Domna left; reverse YΠ KYNTIΛIANOY MAPKIANOΠOΛI−TΩ−N, Athena standing left, phiale in extended right over flaming altar, left hand on shield, column surmounted by eagle right, E in right field; choice for the type; rare (Varbanov R7); SOLD










REFERENCES|

Corpus Nummorum Thracorum - http://www.corpus-nummorum.eu/
Hristova, N. & G. Jekov. The Local Coinage of the Roman Empire - Moesia Inferior, I - III c. A.D., Marcianopolis. (Blagoevgrad, 2006).
Lindgren, H. Ancient Greek Bronze Coins: European Mints. (San Mateo, 1989).
Lindgren, H. Ancient Greek Bronze Coins. (Quarryville, 1993).
Moushmov, N. Ancient Coins of the Balkan Peninsula. (1912).
Pick, B. & K. Regling. Die antiken Münzen von Dacien und Moesien. AMNG I/I. (Berlin, 1898).
Poole, R.S. ed. A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Thrace, etc. (London, 1877).
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Volume 1: Europe. (London, 1978).
Sear, D. Greek Imperial Coins and Their Values. (London, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 2: Macedonia and Thrace. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, München Staatlische Münzsammlung, Part 7: Taurische Chersones. Sarmatien. Dacia. Moesia superior. Moesia inferior. (Berlin, 1985).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain XII, The Hunterian Museum, University of Glasgow, Part 1: Roman Provincial Coins: Spain - Kingdoms of Asia Minor. (Oxford, 2004).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Hungary, Budapest, Magyar Nemzeti Múzeum, III: Moesia inferior. (Milan, 2000).
Varbanov, Ivan. Greek Imperial Coins And Their Values, Volume I: Dacia, Moesia Superior & Moesia Inferior. (Bourgas, Bulgaria, 2005).

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