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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Anatolia| ▸ |Aeolis||View Options:  |  |  |   

Aeolis

Aeolis was not originally a geographic term but a collective name for the cities in the region on the west coast of Asia Minor founded by the Aeolians, a branch of the Hellenic peoples. The twelve southern cities were grouped in the Aeolian League; these were Temnos, Smyrna, Pitane, Neonteichos, Aegirusa, Notium, Cilla or Killa, Cyme, Gryneum, Larissa, Myrina, and Aegae.

Kyme, Aiolis, 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

|Aeolis|, |Kyme,| |Aiolis,| |2nd| |-| |1st| |Century| |B.C.|, |AE| |16|
Cyme, one of the oldest Aeolian cities, was probably a colony of Cyme in Euboea, though according to tradition it was founded by the Amazon Kyme. Its large capable port was a valuable maritime asset to the Persian Empire, contributing ships to Dareios in 512 B.C. and to Xerxes in 480 B.C. After the Battle of Salamis, the remnants of Xerxes' fleet wintered at Cyme. After Persia, Aeolis was held successively by the Macedonians, Seleucids, Pergamenes, Romans, Byzantine, and Ottomans.
MA95726. Bronze AE 16, BMC Troas, p. 113, 90; SNG Cop 106; SNGvA 1641; SNG Ashmolean 1416, F, weight 3.739 g, maximum diameter 16.0 mm, die axis 0o, Kyme (near Nemrut Limani, Turkey) mint, 2nd - 1st century B.C.; obverse draped bust of Artemis right, bow and quiver at shoulder; reverse oinochoe (one-handled vase), between two laurel branches, KY above, A−ΠA/T−OY/P−I/O−Σ across field; $23.50 (21.62)


Julia Domna, Augusta, 194 - 8 April 217 A.D., Elaia, Aiolis

|Aeolis|, |Julia| |Domna,| |Augusta,| |194| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.,| |Elaia,| |Aiolis|, |AE| |19|
Elaea was the ancient port for Pergamum, located near the modern town of Zeytindag, Izmir Province, Turkey. During the Hellenistic period, Elaia was under the control of Alexander the Great, Lysimachus, Seleucids and Attalids respectively. Travelers coming to Pergamum by sea, would land at Elaea. One of the passages of Livy shows that there was a small hill near Elaea, and that the town was in a plain and walled. Elaea was damaged by an earthquake in the reign of Trajan, at the same time that Pitane suffered. The ruins of the silted port's breakwater can be seen on satellite photos.
RP92861. Bronze AE 19, SNG Munchen 433, Tekin Elaia -, SNG Cop -, SNGvA -, BMC Troas -, Weber -, Choice F, well centered, light marks, light deposits, weight 3.789 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 0o, Elaia (near Zeytindag, Turkey) mint mint, 194 - 8 Apr 217 A.D.; obverse IOY ∆OMNA CEBA, draped bust right; reverse EΛAITΩN, Hygieia standing left, feeding serpent held in her arms; extremely rare; $110.00 SALE |PRICE| $99.00


Myrina, Aeolis, 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

|Aeolis|, |Myrina,| |Aeolis,| |2nd| |-| |1st| |Century| |B.C.|, |AE| |16|
Myrina is said to have been founded before the other Aeolian cities by either Myrinus or the Amazon Myrina. Artaxerxes gave Gryneium and Myrina to Gongylus, an Eretrian, who had been banished from his native city for favoring Persia. Myrina had a good harbor. Pliny the Elder mentions the fame of its oysters and that it bore the surname of Sebastopolis (venerable city). An inscription tells us that Myrina was within the Kingdom of Pergamon in the 3rd century B.C. For some time Myrina was occupied by Philip V of Macedon; but the Romans compelled him to evacuate, and declared the place free. It twice suffered severe earthquakes, in the reigns of Tiberius and Trajan. The town was restored each time, and continued to exist until a late period. It was the birthplace of Agathias, a Byzantine poet and historian of the 6th century.
GB93490. Bronze AE 16, SNG Cop 225; SNGvA 1666; SNG Munchen 571 - 573; BMC Troas p. 137, 27 ff., Choice VF, green patina with highlighting buff earthen deposits, weight 4.477 g, maximum diameter 16.1 mm, die axis 0o, Aiolis, Myrina (near Aliaga, Turkey) mint, 2nd - 1st century B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse amphora, lyre right, MY-PI flanking across lower field; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $100.00 SALE |PRICE| $90.00


Kyme, Aiolis, c. 480 - 450 B.C.

|Aeolis|, |Kyme,| |Aiolis,| |c.| |480| |-| |450| |B.C.|, |hemiobol|
Cyme, one of the oldest Aeolian cities, was probably a colony of Cyme in Euboea, though according to tradition it was founded by the Amazon Kyme. Its large capable port was a valuable maritime asset to the Persian Empire, contributing ships to Dareios in 512 B.C. and to Xerxes in 480 B.C. After the Battle of Salamis, the remnants of Xerxes' fleet wintered at Cyme. After Persia, Aeolis was held successively by the Macedonians, Seleucids, Pergamenes, Romans, Byzantine, and Ottomans.
GS94116. Silver hemiobol, cf. SNG Kayhan 84; SNG Cop 31; SNGvA 1623; BMC Troas p. 105, 10 ff.; Klein 333; Rosen 538, aVF, etched surfaces, scratches, weight 0.280 g, maximum diameter 7.0 mm, Kyme (near Nemrut Limani, Turkey) mint, c. 480 - 450 B.C.; obverse eagle head left, KY or no ethnic; reverse irregular square incuse; $90.00 SALE |PRICE| $81.00


Elaia, Aeolis, c. 340 - 275 B.C.

|Aeolis|, |Elaia,| |Aeolis,| |c.| |340| |-| |275| |B.C.|, |AE| |11|
Herodotus describes the following story relevant to the olive wreath. Xerxes was interrogating some Arcadians after the Battle of Thermopylae. Asked why there were so few Greek men defending the Thermopylae, they answered, "All other men are participating in the Olympic Games." And when asked "What is the prize for the winner?", "An olive-wreath" came the answer. Then Tigranes, one of his generals uttered a most noble saying: "Good heavens! Mardonius, what kind of men are these against whom you have brought us to fight? Men who do not compete for possessions, but for honor."
GB92019. Bronze AE 11, SNG Cop 169; SNGvA 1605; SNG Munchen 386; SNG Tbingen 2685; BMC Troas p. 126, 11, VF, some porosity, light earthen deposits, weight 1.387 g, maximum diameter 11.2 mm, die axis 270o, Elaia (near Zeytindag, Turkey) mint, c. 340 - 275 B.C.; obverse head of Athena left in Corinthian helmet; reverse E − Λ either side of grain kernel, the whole within olive wreath; ex FORVM (2009), ex Mediterranean Coins; $65.00 SALE |PRICE| $58.50


Atarneus, Mysia, c. 400 - 350 B.C.

|Other| |Mysia|, |Atarneus,| |Mysia,| |c.| |400| |-| |350| |B.C.|, |AE| |10|
Atarneus, also known as Atarna, was in the region of Aeolis but most numismatic references place the city in Mysia. It was on the mainland opposite the island of Lesbos, on the road from Adramyttium to the plain of the Caicus. Atarneus was founded by Cilicians during the 5th century B.C., it received many Chian colonists. The city is best known for its association with Aristotle. After the death of his father, Aristotle was cared for and educated by Proxenus of Atarneus, possibly his uncle. At the Academy, Aristotle made friends with Hermias, who became the ruler of Atarneus. After the death of Plato, Aristotle stayed with Hermias, and married Hermias' niece Pythia. Atarneus was probably deserted completely in the 1st century A.D. due to an epidemic.
GB89007. Bronze AE 10, cf. SNG BnF 130; SNG Cop 27; Fritze Mysiens 346; BMC Mysia p. 14, 6; SNGvA -, aF, tight irregular flan, corrosion, weight 0.918 g, maximum diameter 10.4 mm, die axis 90o, Aiolis, Atarneus (Kale Tepe, NE of Dikili, Turkey) mint, c. 400 - 350 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse ATA, horse forepart right; rare city; $36.00 SALE |PRICE| $32.40


Elaia, Aiolis, 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

|Aeolis|, |Elaia,| |Aiolis,| |2nd| |-| |1st| |Century| |B.C.|, |AE| |15|
Elaea or Elaia was an ancient city of Aeolis, the port of Pergamum. The site is not precisely determined but is somewhere near the modern town of Zeytindag, Izmir Province, Turkey. According to Strabo, from Livy (xxxv. 13), travelers who would reach Pergamum from the sea, would land at Elaea. One of the passages of Livy shows that there was a small hill near Elaea, and that the town was on a plain and walled. Elaea was damaged by an earthquake in the reign of Trajan.
GB89013. Bronze AE 15, BMC Troas p. 127, 20; SNGvA 7685; SNG Cop 181; SNG Munchen 395; SGCV II 4206, F, dark patina, scratches, porosity, earthen deposits, weight 3.725 g, maximum diameter 14.9 mm, die axis 0o, Aiolis, Aigai (near Yuntdagi Koseler, Turkey) mint, 2nd - 1st century B.C.; obverse head of Demeter right, wearing grain wreath; reverse lit torch, EΛ−AI/T−ΩN in two divided lines, all within grain wreath; ex Gerhard Rohde; $36.00 SALE |PRICE| $32.40


Aigai, Aiolis, 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

|Aeolis|, |Aigai,| |Aiolis,| |2nd| |-| |1st| |Century| |B.C.|, |AE| |16|
Aegae (or Aigai) means place of goats and was the name of many cities of antiquity. Aigai, Aiolis was also an important sanctuary of Apollo. It was within the Lydian Empire, then the Achaemenid Persian Empire, but had its brightest period under the Attalid dynasty, which ruled from nearby Pergamon in the 3rd and 2nd centuries B.C. It changed hands from Pergamon to the Seleucid Empire, but was recaptured by Attalus I of Pergamon in 218 B.C. In the war between Bithynia and Pergamon, it was destroyed by Prusias II of Bithynia in 156 B.C. After a peace was brokered by the Romans, the city was compensated with 100 talents. In 129 B.C., the Kingdom of Pergamon became part of the Roman Empire. Aigai was destroyed by an earthquake in 17 A.D. and received aid for reconstruction from Tiberius. The ruins are near the village of Yuntdagi Koseler in Manisa Province, Turkey.
GB85812. Bronze AE 16, Gorny & Mosch auction 160, lot 1477 (otherwise apparently unpublished); SNG Cop 14 var. (monograms); SNGvA -; SNG Munchen -, BMC Troas -; Lindgren -, aVF, marks and scratches, encrustations, light corrosion, edge crack, weight 2.205 g, maximum diameter 15.8 mm, die axis 315o, Aiolis, Aigai (near Yuntdagi Koseler, Turkey) mint, 2nd - 1st Century B.C.; obverse draped bust of Hermes right, wearing petasos; reverse AIΓAEΩN, forepart of goat standing right, monograms (controls) above and right; ex Moneta Numismatic Services; extremely rare; $45.00 SALE |PRICE| $40.50


Elaea, Aeolis, 138 - 192 A.D.

|Aeolis|, |Elaea,| |Aeolis,| |138| |-| |192| |A.D.|, |AE| |15|
The head on this type has traditionally been identified as Lucius Verus; however, Lucius Verus was 30 years old when he was made caesar and he was made augustus simultaneously. The legend and young portrait suggest it might be someone else. RPC identifies the identity of the head as uncertain and lists Lucius Verus, Lucius Aelius and Commodus as possibilities.
GB86137. Orichalcum AE 15, RPC IV temp 216; SNG Cop 197; SNGvA 1612; SNG Mn 427; SNG Delepierre 9; SNG Leypold I 513; BMC Troas p. 130, 46; Lindgren III 330; McClean III 7943, VF, centered on a tight flan, porous, weight 2.708 g, maximum diameter 14.5 mm, die axis 0o, Aeolis, Elaea mint, 138 - 192 A.D.; obverse Λ OVKIOC - KAICAP, head of youthful Caesar (Lucius Verus, Annius Verus or Commodus) right; reverse EΛAI-TΩN, kalathos containing poppy in center and four stalks of grain; $40.00 SALE |PRICE| $36.00


Aigai, Aiolis, 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

|Aeolis|, |Aigai,| |Aiolis,| |2nd| |-| |1st| |Century| |B.C.|, |AE| |17|
Aigai, or Aigaiai, is mentioned by both Herodotus and Strabo as being a member of the Aeolian dodecapolis. It was also an important sanctuary of Apollo. Initially the city was a possession of the Lydian Empire and later the Achaemenid Empire. Aigai had its brightest period under the Attalid dynasty, which ruled from nearby Pergamon in the 3rd and 2nd century B.C. It changed hands from Pergamon to the Seleucid Empire, but was recaptured by Attalus I of Pergamon in 218 B.C. In the war between Bithynia and Pergamon, it was destroyed by Prusias II of Bithynia in 156 B.C. After a peace was brokered by the Romans, the city was compensated with hundred talents. In 129 B.C. the Kingdom of Pergamon became part of the Roman Empire. The city was destroyed by an earthquake in 17 A.D. and received aid for reconstruction from emperor Tiberius. The remains of the city are located near the modern village of Yuntdagi Koseler in Manisa Province, Turkey.
GB90401. Bronze AE 17, SNG Cop 12 var. (different monograms); SNGvA 1598 var. (same); SNG Munchen 368 var. (same); BMC Troas p. 96, 14 (no monograms); SGCV II 4169, gVF, weight 4.601 g, maximum diameter 17.3 mm, die axis 0o, Aiolis, Aigai (near Yuntdagi Koseler, Turkey) mint, 2nd - 1st Centuries B.C.; obverse helmeted head of Athena right; reverse AIΓAEΩN, Nike standing left, wreath in right hand, palm frond in left hand, monogram left, monogram right; $80.00 SALE |PRICE| $72.00




  






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