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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |The Twelve Caesars| ▸ |Domitian||View Options:  |  |  |   

Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D.

Flavius Domitianus was an effective emperor who spent much of his time in the provinces preserving order. Despite his effectiveness, he was extremely unpopular with the senatorial class at Rome. He appointed persons from the lower classes to positions of authority. Domitian's reign was marred by paranoia and cruelty in his latter years and he executed many Senators. When asked to prohibit execution of senators without a trial by peers he declined, thus dispelling the old illusions of republican government and exposing the true autocracy of his rule. In 96 A.D., he was stabbed to death in a plot, allegedly involving his own wife.

|Domitian|, |Domitian,| |13| |September| |81| |-| |18| |September| |96| |A.D.||denarius|NEW
In 77 or 78 A.D., Gnaeus Julius Agricola was made governor of Roman Britain, a post he occupied until 84. In his first year, Agricola subdued the Ordovices in Wales and pursued the remnants of the tribe to Anglesey, the holy island of the Druids. According to Tacitus, he exterminated the whole tribe. The Ordovices do completely disappear from the historical record, but considering the mountainous terrain, it is unlikely killed the entire population. Another tribe, the Silures, was either also militarily defeated or simply agreed to terms. Tacitus wrote of the Silures: non atrocitate, non clementia mutabatur - the tribe "was changed neither by cruelty nor by clemency." A Roman squadron, sent by Agricola, explored the north of Scotland for the first time, discovering the Orkney and Shetland Islands.Pre-Roman Wales
RS113412. Silver denarius, RIC II-1 Vespasian 921 (C2); RSC II 47; BMCRE II Vespasian 193; BnF III Vespasian 169; SRCV I 2637, aVF, ragged irregular flan, toned, porous, weight 3.254 g, maximum diameter 17.2 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, as caesar, early 76 - early 77 A.D.; obverse CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS, laureate head right; reverse COS IIII, Pegasus standing right, archaic curved wing (only near wing showing), raising left foreleg; $70.00 SALE PRICE $63.00


|Domitian|, |Domitian,| |13| |September| |81| |-| |18| |September| |96| |A.D.||as|NEW
Domitian's CENSORIA POTESTAT issues were struck in April 85 A.D., followed for a very short transitional period by the CENS POTES issues, then the CENS POT issues, and finally the CENS P issues towards the end of the year.
RB111705. Copper as, RIC II-1 384 (R); BnF III 386; Hunter I 131 var. (AVGVST); BMCRE II p. 375* var. (same); Cohen I 326 var. (AVG); cf. SRCV I 2807 (COS XV), VF, excellent portrait, part of rev. legend unstruck/off flan, areas of porosity/light corrosion, weight 10.916 g, maximum diameter 28.9 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, Nov - Dec 85 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM COS XI CENS POT P P, laureate bust right with aegis; reverse MONETA AVGVSTI, Moneta standing left, scales in right cornucopia in left hand, S - C across field; rare; $180.00 SALE PRICE $162.00


Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D., Side, Pamphylia

|Side|, |Domitian,| |13| |September| |81| |-| |18| |September| |96| |A.D.,| |Side,| |Pamphylia||AE| |18|
Athena is the Greek goddess of wisdom, war, the arts, industry, justice, and skill. Her usual attribute is the owl and Nike is her frequent companion.
RP112716. Bronze AE 18, RPC II 1528, SNG Pflzer 625, SNGvA 4811 var. (ethnic divided across field), SNG Cop 415 var. (same), BMC Lycia -, F, dark patina, spots of corrosion, edge crack, weight 4.081 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 0o, Side (near Selimiye, Antalya Province, Turkey) mint, 13 Sep 81 - 18 Sep 96 A.D.; obverse ΔOMITIANOC KAICAP (counterclockwise from upper left), laureate head right; reverse CIΔHT (counterclockwise from upper left), Athena advancing left, wearing crested helmet, long chiton, and peplos, transverse spear and pomegranate in right hand, round shield in left hand, snake right at feet on left; scarce variant; $80.00 SALE PRICE $72.00


Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D., Antioch, Syria

|Antioch|, |Domitian,| |13| |September| |81| |-| |18| |September| |96| |A.D.,| |Antioch,| |Syria||AE| |26|
The ruins of Antioch on the Orontes lie near the modern city of Antakya, Turkey. Founded near the end of the 4th century B.C. by Seleucus I Nicator, one of Alexander the Great's generals, Antioch's geographic, military and economic location, particularly the spice trade, the Silk Road, the Persian Royal Road, benefited its occupants, and eventually it rivaled Alexandria as the chief city of the Near East and as the main center of Hellenistic Judaism at the end of the Second Temple period. Antioch is called "the cradle of Christianity," for the pivotal early role it played in the emergence of the faith. It was one of the four cities of the Syrian tetrapolis. Its residents are known as Antiochenes. Once a great metropolis of half a million people, it declined to insignificance during the Middle Ages because of warfare, repeated earthquakes and a change in trade routes following the Mongol conquests, which then no longer passed through Antioch from the far east.6th Century Antioch
CM112118. Bronze AE 26, RPC II 2022g (2 spec.); McAlee 407g (ex rare); countermark: Howgego 245, gF, tight flan cutting off most of legend, marks, weight 11.872 g, maximum diameter 25.6 mm, die axis 0o, 7th officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 81 - 83 A.D.; obverse IMP DOMITIANVS CAES AVG, laureate head right; countermark: Athena standing right in 6x4mm rectangular punch, spear vertical behind in her right, left hand resting on grounded shield; reverse large S C (senatus consulto), Z (7th officina) below, within laurel wreath with eight bunches of leaves; from the Michael Arslan Collection; extremely rare; $120.00 SALE PRICE $108.00


Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria

|Antioch|, |Domitian,| |13| |September| |81| |-| |18| |September| |96| |A.D.,| |Antioch,| |Seleucis| |and| |Pieria,| |Syria||as|
The ruins of Antioch on the Orontes lie near the modern city of Antakya, Turkey. Founded near the end of the 4th century B.C. by Seleucus I Nicator, one of Alexander the Great's generals, Antioch's geographic, military and economic location, particularly the spice trade, the Silk Road, the Persian Royal Road, benefited its occupants, and eventually it rivaled Alexandria as the chief city of the Near East and as the main center of Hellenistic Judaism at the end of the Second Temple period. Antioch is called "the cradle of Christianity," for the pivotal early role it played in the emergence of the faith. It was one of the four cities of the Syrian tetrapolis. Its residents are known as Antiochenes. Once a great metropolis of half a million people, it declined to insignificance during the Middle Ages because of warfare, repeated earthquakes and a change in trade routes following the Mongol conquests, which then no longer passed through Antioch from the far east.6th Century Antioch
RP111928. Bronze as, McAlee 402(d) (rare); RPC II 2016; BMC Galatia p. 181, 246, VF, earthen deposits, obverse corrosion, weight 13.209 g, maximum diameter 27.8 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, as caesar, 69 - 79 A.D.; obverse DOMITIANVS CAESAR, laureate head left; reverse large S C, no dot in field, within laurel wreath with eight bunches of leaves; from the Michael Arslan Collection; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00


Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D., Caesarea Maritima, Samaria, Judaea

|Roman| |Judea| |&| |Palestina|, |Domitian,| |13| |September| |81| |-| |18| |September| |96| |A.D.,| |Caesarea| |Maritima,| |Samaria,| |Judaea||AE| |21|
Caesarea, about 30 miles north of Joppa and about 70 miles northwest of Jerusalem, was founded by Herod the Great and named for Caesar Augustus. It was the seat of the Roman procurators and the Roman military headquarters in Judaea. The Pilate Stone, discovered here in 1961, is only archaeological find that names Pontius Pilate, by whose order Jesus was crucified. After the destruction of Jerusalem in 70 A.D., Caesarea was the provincial capital of the Judaea Province. Well into Byzantine times, Caesarea remained the capital. In the 630s, Arab Muslim armies took the region, but kept Caesarea as its administrative center until early 8th century. Caesarea's ruins are a national park on the Mediterranean coast of Israel, about halfway between Tel Aviv and Haifa.
RP111787. Bronze AE 21, RPC Online II 2231 (11 spec.); Kadman Caesarea 20; Rosenberger 18; Sofaer 19; BMC Palestine p. 16, 36, VF, brown-green surfaces, light earthen deposits, weight 9.036 g, maximum diameter 20.8 mm, die axis 0o, Caesarea Maritima (Keisaria, Israel) mint, obverse IMP DOMITIANVS CAESAR DIVI F AVG, laureate head right; reverse COL I FLA - AVG CAES (clockwise from upper right), Tyche standing slightly left, head left, wearing turreted crown, right foot on prow, human bust in right hand, cross-headed standard in left hand; ex Triton XXV (11 Jan 2022), lot 6497; ex Dr. Jay M. Galst Collection; ex IML (July 2006); this is the first specimen of this type handled by FORVM; $180.00 SALE PRICE $162.00


Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D., Judaea Capta, Caesarea Maritima, Samaria, Judaea

|Roman| |Judea| |&| |Palestina|, |Domitian,| |13| |September| |81| |-| |18| |September| |96| |A.D.,| |Judaea| |Capta,| |Caesarea| |Maritima,| |Samaria,| |Judaea||AE| |23|
Judaea Capta issue minted at Caesarea Maritima, Judaea. This issue mistakenly titles Domitian 'IMP XXIII' though he never received a twenty-third acclamation. All known specimens of this type display this error.
RP111372. Bronze AE 23, RPC Online II 2308 (20 spec.); Hendin 6486; Meshorer TJC 395; Sofaer 36; SNG ANS 487; SNG Cop 109; BMC Palestine p. 281, 38, aVF, nice portrait, blue-green and red patina, marks, off center, legends weak, edge splits, weight 10.817 g, maximum diameter 23.2 mm, die axis 0o, Caesarea Maritima (Keisaria, Israel) mint, 92 - 93 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM PM TR P XII, laureate head right; reverse IMP XXIII COS XVI CENS P P P, Victory advancing left in flowing gown, wreath in right hand, trophy in left; $135.00 SALE PRICE $122.00


Titus, 24 June 79 - 13 September 81 A.D., Germe ad Rhyndakos, Mysia, Domitian Reverse

|Other| |Mysia|, |Titus,| |24| |June| |79| |-| |13| |September| |81| |A.D.,| |Germe| |ad| |Rhyndakos,| |Mysia,| |Domitian| |Reverse||AE| |18|
There were two towns named Germe, Germe ad Rhyndakos near Pergamum in Mysia and Germa ad Caicus in Lydia. BMC and SNG Cop include the city under Lydia. But recent scholarship indicates only Germe ad Rhyndakos in Mysia struck coins.
RP111205. Brass AE 18, RPC Online II 930, Ehling 14-25, SNG Cop 135, Weber 6809 (Germe, Lydia), SNGvA -, BMC Lydia -, VF, off center, porous, die break on rev., weight 4.340 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 315o, Mysia, Germe ad Rhyndakos mint mint, obverse AYTO KAI CEBAC, laureate head of Titus, stalks of grain before chin; reverse AYTO KAI CEBAC, laureate head of Domitian right; from the Michael Arslan Collection; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00


Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D., Lampsakos, Mysia

|Lampsakos|, |Domitian,| |13| |September| |81| |-| |18| |September| |96| |A.D.,| |Lampsakos,| |Mysia
||AE| |16|
This type and a variety with the full ethnic were the only types struck at Lampsakos during the Flavian period.

In Greek mythology, Priapus was a minor rustic fertility god, protector of livestock, fruit plants, gardens and male genitalia. Priapus is marked by his oversized, permanent erection, which gave rise to the medical term priapism. He became a popular figure in Roman erotic art and Latin literature, and is the subject of the often humorously obscene collection of verse called the Priapeia.
RP111643. Bronze AE 16, RPC II 890 (3 spec.), SNG BnF 1270, SNG Cop 235, F/aF, green patina, corrosion, flaw in neck, edge split, weight 2.884 g, maximum diameter 16.0 mm, die axis 180o, Lampsakos (Lapseki, Turkey) mint, 13 Sep 81 - 18 Sep 96 A.D.; obverse ΔOMITIANOC KAICAPI, laureate head right; reverse statue of ithyphallic Priapos standing left on basis, ΛA-MKΨ in downward columns flanking statue; very rare; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00


Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D., Ascalon, Philistia, Judaea

|Judaea| |&| |Palestine|, |Domitian,| |13| |September| |81| |-| |18| |September| |96| |A.D.,| |Ascalon,| |Philistia,| |Judaea||AE| |18|
The Philistines conquered Canaanite Ashkelon about 1150 B.C. and it became one of the five Philistine cities that were constantly warring with the Israelites and the Kingdom of Judah. The last of the Philistine cities to hold out against Nebuchadnezzar, it finally fell in 604 B.C.; burned and destroyed, its people exiled, the Philistine era ended. Ashkelon was rebuilt, dominated by Persian culture. After the Alexander's conquest, Ashkelon was an important Hellenistic seaport. The Jews drove the Greeks out of the region during the Maccabean Revolt, which lasted from 167 to 160 B.C. In 63 B.C. the area was incorporated into the Roman Republic. Cleopatra VII used Ashkelon as her refuge when her brother and sister exiled her in 49 B.C. The city remained loyal to Rome during the First Jewish Revolt.
JD111092. Bronze AE 18, RPC Online II 2216; SNG Cop 36; SNG ANS 700; SNG Righetti 2460; BMC Palestine p. 123, 132; Lindgren 2458; Rosenberger 118; Sofaer 85, Choice F, green patina, highlighting earthen deposits, weight 5.622 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 0o, Askalon (Ashqelon, Israel) mint, 94 - 95 A.D.; obverse CEBAC (caesar) downward before, laureate head left; reverse Phanebal (war god of Ascalon) standing facing, wearing military dress, raising sword above head in right hand, shield and palm frond in left hand, HP (year 198 of the Ascalon Era) downward on left, AC (Ascalon) upward on right; scarce; $140.00 SALE PRICE $126.00




  






OBVERSE| LEGENDS|

CAESARAVGFDOMITIANCOSII
CAESARAVGFDOMITIANVS
CAESARAVGFDOMITIANVSCOSII
CAESARAVGFDOMITIANVSCOSIII
CAESARAVGFDOMITIANVSCOSIIII
CAESARAVGFDOMITIANVSCOSV
CAESARAVGFDOMITIANVSCOSVI
CAESARAVGFDOMITIANVSCOSVII
CAESARDIVIAVGVESPFDOMITIANVSCOSVII
CAESARDIVIFDOMITIANVSCOSVII
CAESAVGFDOMITCOSII
CAESAVGFDOMITCOSIII
CAESAVGFDOMITIANCOSII
CAESDIVIAVGVESP
CAESDIVIFDOMITIANVSCOSVII
CAESDIVIVESPFDOMITIANCOSVII
DOMITIANVSAVGGERM
DOMITIANVSAVGGERMANICVS
DOMITIANVSAVGVSTVS
DOMITIANVSCAESARAVGF
IMPCAESARDOMITIANVSAVG
IMPCAESDIVIVESPFDOMITIANAVG
IMPCAESDIVIVESPFDOMITIANAVGPM
IMPCAESDOMITAVGGERMANPMTRPVII
IMPCAESDOMITAVGGERMCOSXI
IMPCAESDOMITAVGGERMCOSXICENSPOTPP
IMPCAESDOMITAVGGERMCOSXICENSPERPP
IMPCAESDOMITAVGGERMCOSXIICENSPERPP
IMPCAESDOMITAVGGERMCOSXIIICENSPERPP
IMPCAESDOMITAVGGERMCOSXIIIICENSPERPP
IMPCAESDOMITAVGGERMCOSXVCENSPERPP
IMPCAESDOMITAVGGERMCOSXVICENSPERPP
IMPCAESDOMITAVGGERMCOSXVIICENSPERPP
IMPCAESDOMITAVGGERMPMCOSVII
IMPCAESDOMITAVGGERMPMTRPOTV
IMPCAESDOMITAVGGERMPMTRPIIII
IMPCAESDOMITAVGGERMPMTRPV
IMPCAESDOMITAVGGERMPMTRPVI
IMPCAESDOMITAVGGERMPMTRPVII
IMPCAESDOMITAVGGERMPMTRPVIII
IMPCAESDOMITAVGGERMPMTRPVIIICENSPERPP
IMPCAESDOMITAVGGERMPMTRPVIIII
IMPCAESDOMITAVGGERMPMTRPX
IMPCAESDOMITAVGGERMPMTRPXI
IMPCAESDOMITAVGGERMPMTRPXII
IMPCAESDOMITAVGGERMPMTRPXIII
IMPCAESDOMITAVGGERMPMTRPXIIII
IMPCAESDOMITAVGGERMPMTRPXV
IMPCAESDOMITAVGGERMPMTRPXVI
IMPCAESDOMITAVGGERMPMTRPVIIICENSPERPP
IMPCAESDOMITIANAVGGERMCOSX
IMPCAESDOMITIANAVGGERMCOSXI
IMPCAESDOMITIANAVGGERMANIC
IMPCAESDOMITIANAVGGERMANICVS
IMPCAESDOMITIANAVGGERMV
IMPCAESDOMITIANAVGPMCOSVII
IMPCAESDOMITIANAVGPMCOSVIII
IMPCAESDOMITIANVSAVGGERMANIC
IMPCAESDOMITIANVSAVGGERMANICVS
IMPCAESDOMITIANVSAVGPM
IMPCAESDOMITIANVSAVGPONT
IMPDOMITAVGGERM
IMPDOMITAVGGERMCOSXI
IMPDOMITIANCAESDIVIVESPFAVGPMTRPPPCOSVII
IMPDOMITIANCAESDIVIVESPFAVGPMTRPPPCOSVIII
IMPDOMITIANVSAVG


REFERENCES|

American Numismatic Society (ANS) Collections Database Online - http://numismatics.org/search/search
Banti, A. & L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Burnett, A. & M. Amandry. Roman Provincial Coinage II: From Vespasian to Domitian (AD 69-96). (London, 1999).
Butcher, K. Coinage in Roman Syria: Northern Syria, 64 BC - AD 253. Royal Numismatic Society Special Publication 34. (London, 2004).
Calic, E. The Roman Avrei, Vol. I: From the Republic to Pertinax, 196 BC - 193 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Carradice, I. & T. Buttrey. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol. II, Part 1: From AD 69 to 96. (London, 2007).
Cayn, J. Los Sestercios del Imperio Romano, Vol. I: De Pompeyo Magno a Matidia (Del 81 a.C. al 117 d.C.). (Madrid, 1984).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappes sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 1: Pompey to Domitian. (Paris, 1880).
Giard, J. Le monnayage de l'atelier de Lyon, De Claude Ier Vespasien (41-78 aprs J.-C.), et au temps de Clodius Albinus (196-197 aprs J.-C.). (Wetteren, 2000).
Giard, J. Monnaies de l'Empire romain, III Du soulvement de 68 aprs J.-C. a Nerva. Bibliothque nationale de France. (Paris, 1998).
Hendin, D. Guide to Biblical Coins, 6th Edition. (Amphora, 2021).
Mattingly, H. & R. Carson. Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum, Vol. 2: Vespasian to Domitian. (London, 1930).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. I. Augustus to Nerva. (Oxford, 1962).
Seaby, H. & R. Loosley. Roman Silver Coins, Vol. II: Tiberius to Commodus. (London, 1979).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values, The Millennium Edition, Volume One, The Republic and the Twelve Caesars 280 BC - AD 86. (London, 2000).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

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