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Roman Antiquities
Greek & Roman Art: Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

|Roman| |Coin| |Books|, |Greek| |&| |Roman| |Art:| |Museum| |of| |Fine| |Arts,| |Boston|
Free on request with any order. Don't put it in the shopping cart, just put "BL43196 Free" in the checkout comments.
BL43196. Greek & Roman Art: Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, a small booklet with over 40 black and white photographs and descriptions of superb pieces from the museum collection; perfect for throne room reading; $2.00 SALE PRICE $1.80


Late Roman - Byzantine, Holyland (Syro-Palestinian), Bi-Lanceolate Pottery Oil Lamp, c. 270 - 500 A.D.

|Oil| |Lamps|, |Late| |Roman| |-| |Byzantine,| |Holyland| |(Syro-Palestinian),| |Bi-Lanceolate| |Pottery| |Oil| |Lamp,| |c.| |270| |-| |500| |A.D.|
Adler notes these lamps are found throughout the northern part of Israel, especially in Beit Shean and Hamat Gader, and date to the fourth and fifth centuries. Sussman lists more than a dozen very similar lamps, most found at Beit Shean, and she dates them to the late third and fourth centuries. Hamat Gader was already a well known health and recreation site in Roman times, mentioned in Strabo, Origen and Eunapius, as well as the Rabbinic literature. Construction of the bath complex began in the 2nd century by the 10th Roman Legion, which was garrisoned in nearby Gadara (modern Umm Qais). The ancient Hebrew name means hot springs of (the ancient city of) Gadara. The Arabic name El-Hamma preserves this, and the name of the tel located near the site, Tel Bani, is a corruption of the Latin word meaning "baths." The empress Aelia Eudocia composed a poem praising the qualities of the multiple springs which was inscribed so that visitors could see it as they went into the pool. The photo to the right is of the ancient Roman baths. Click the photo to see a larger image.Hammat Gader Baths
AL93940. Bi-lanceolate pottery oil lamp; Adler Collection (website) type N2; cf. Sussman Late 3126; Schloessinger 451; Bailey BMC -; 8.7 cm (3 3/8") long, Choice, complete and intact, tiny chips (from ancient use), earthen deposits, soot at nozzle, c. 270 - 500 A.D.; pink clay, buff slip, mold made with incised and/or punched decoration, the body includes the entire lamp from tip of nozzle to tip of "tongue" handle, wide rim and incised groove surround a large fill hole, pair of grooves on handle, incised oblique lines radiating from fill hole (wreath?) on narrow convex shoulders, incised herringbone pattern on bottom of the nozzle; $120.00 SALE PRICE $96.00


Roman, Eastern Mediterranean, Glass Bottle, c. 1st - 3rd Century A.D.

|Glass| |Antiquities|, |Roman,| |Eastern| |Mediterranean,| |Glass| |Bottle,| |c.| |1st| |-| |3rd| |Century| |A.D.|
Our specimen is weathered making it in part iridescent and making the original color difficult to determine. Iridescence is a beautiful effect of ancient glass weathering, which distorts the original color and transparency of the glass with rainbow-like colors. The referenced Hermitage Collection bottle is described as clear pink-violet glass. It does appear this piece might have been the same color.
AG23897. cf. Hermitage Collection 355, Ontario Museum 222, Corning I 197,, Choice, very tiny chip on rim, areas of encrustation, weathering, iridescent areas, probably 1st century A.D.; glass unguentarium, 8.8 cm (3 1/2") tall, free-blown, violet(?) glass, squat piriform body, long cylindrical neck widening to body, rim everted and then folded in, flat bottom with no pontil mark; ex Griffin Gallery of Ancient Art (Boca Raton FL); $700.00 SALE PRICE $630.00


Roman-Byzantine, Syro-Palestinian, Glass Dropper Flask, c. Late 1st - Early 5th Century A.D.

|Glass| |Antiquities|, |Roman-Byzantine,| |Syro-Palestinian,| |Glass| |Dropper| |Flask,| |c.| |Late| |1st| |-| |Early| |5th| |Century| |A.D.|
Thick enamel-like weathering, as seen on this piece, is common on glass found in the Levant and this piece is certainly from the Levante. This flask is, however, a bit of a mystery. There is nothing very similar in the large library of ancient and medieval glass references held by Forum. It resembles an aryballos, but lacks the handles which define that type. It probably was used like an aryballos, to store and dispense scented oil which was rubbed on the skin and then scraped off to clean the body. The date is uncertain. Weathering obscures the original color, making another mystery, but the only other a similar flasks we know are described as opaque black glass.
AG20822. Isings -, et al. -; apparently unpublished but two similar pieces are known from the market (priced $2,500 - $3,000!), Choice, complete and intact, thick tan and brown enamel-like weathering, dropper flask, free-blown, amber(?) glass, 12.0 cm (4 3/4") tall, 8.5 cm maximum diameter, piriform body, very short narrow neck, broad flat folded in rim, round bottom with large pontil mark, not designed to stand on its own we will include a stand; from the collection of Alex G. Malloy, former dealer in antiquities for 40 years; very rare form; $500.00 SALE PRICE $450.00 ON RESERVE


Late Roman - Byzantine, Holyland (Syro-Palestinian), Bi-Lanceolate Pottery Oil Lamp, c. 270 - 500 A.D.

|Oil| |Lamps|, |Late| |Roman| |-| |Byzantine,| |Holyland| |(Syro-Palestinian),| |Bi-Lanceolate| |Pottery| |Oil| |Lamp,| |c.| |270| |-| |500| |A.D.|
Adler notes these lamps are found throughout the northern part of Israel, especially in Beit Shean and Hamat Gader, and date to the fourth and fifth centuries. Sussman lists more than a dozen very similar lamps, most found at Beit Shean, and she dates them to the late third and fourth centuries. At this time,, Beit Shean, was primarily Christian, but evidence of Jewish habitation and a Samaritan synagogue indicate established minority communities. Hamat Gader was already a well known health and recreation site in Roman times, mentioned in Strabo, Origen and Eunapius, as well as the Rabbinic literature. Construction of the bath complex began in the 2nd century by the 10th Roman Legion, which was garrisoned in nearby Gadara (modern Umm Qais). The ancient Hebrew name means hot springs of (the ancient city of) Gadara. The Arabic name El-Hamma preserves this, and the name of the tel located near the site, Tel Bani, is a corruption of the Latin word meaning "baths." The empress Aelia Eudocia composed a poem praising the qualities of the multiple springs which was inscribed so that visitors could see it as they went into the pool. The photo to the right is of the ancient Roman baths. Click the photo to see a larger image.Hammat Gader Baths
AL93918. Bi-lanceolate pottery oil lamp; Adler Collection (website) type N2; Sussman Late 3125- 3136; 8.0 cm (3 1/8") long, near Choice, complete and intact, encrustation, wear, soot on nozzle, c. 270 - 500 A.D.; pink-buff clay, mold made with incised decoration, the body includes the entire lamp from tip of nozzle to tip of "tongue" handle, wide rim surrounds a large fill hole, incised herring-bone geometric wreath pattern on narrow convex shoulders, two incised lengthwise lines on the handle, incised lines between fill hold rim and nozzle; $80.00 SALE PRICE $64.00


Late Roman-Byzantine, Bronze Disk Nomisma Weight, c. 350 - 700 A.D.

|Weights| |&| |Scales|, |Late| |Roman-Byzantine,| |Bronze| |Disk| |Nomisma| |Weight,| |c.| |350| |-| |700| |A.D.||weight|
Late Roman-Byzantine Nomisma weights listed in David Hendin's Ancient Scale Weights and Pre-Coin Currency of the Near East, page 212 - 213, range from 3.91g to 4.54g. Most are marked with the letter N. The variation cannot be solely due to inaccurate scales, the weight of the nomisma must have varied over time and place.
BZ99086. Bronze weight, cf. Weber Byzantinische p. 54, fig. 22; Hendin Weights p. 212, 350 - 351, VF, green patina, scratches, porous, light earthen deposits, weight 4.195 g, maximum diameter 15.3 mm, die axis 0o, c. 350 - 700 A.D.; obverse N engraved in dots, circle of dots within above, raised rim, center punch; reverse unmarked; $50.00 SALE PRICE $45.00


Roman, Lead Conical Bulla Seal, c. 3rd - 4th Century A.D., Attis in Phrygian Cap

|Seals|, |Roman,| |Lead| |Conical| |Bulla| |Seal,| |c.| |3rd| |-| |4th| |Century| |A.D.,| |Attis| |in| |Phrygian| |Cap||bulla| |(tag| |seal)|
During the late Roman and Byzantine periods, lead bullae (singular, Bulla) were widely used to seal and identify the sender of correspondence and containers in shipment. An iron, pliers-shaped instrument, a boulloterion, was used to impress the designs on a lead bulla seal. After the cord was wrapped around the package or document and the ends inserted in a channel in the blank seal, the seal was placed between the disk shaped engraved dies on the jaws of a boulloterion. The boulloterion had a projection above the jaws, which was struck with a hammer to impress the design on the seal and close the channel around the two ends of the cord. With a bulla in place a container cannot be violated without visible damage to either the bulla or the cord, ensuring the contents remain tamper-proof until they reach their destination.
AR83608. Lead bulla (tag seal), Boersema-Dalzell 189, Leukel (1995) N67, gVF, weight 4.45 g, maximum diameter 14.8 mm, die axis 0o, c. 3rd - 4th century A.D.; obverse draped bust of Attis(?) right, wearing Phrygian cap, pedum behind shoulder; reverse flattened conical back, pierced for cord; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00


Roman, Conical Lead Seal, Late 4th - Early 5th Century A.D.

|Seals|, |Roman,| |Conical| |Lead| |Seal,| |Late| |4th| |-| |Early| |5th| |Century| |A.D.||bulla| |(tag| |seal)|
Most likely an imperial seal with a senior Augustus between two junior Augusti, perhaps Theodosius I with Arcadius and Honorius (393 - 395). The similar but smaller Boersema-Dalzell 142 (4.6g) attributed to Arcadius, Honorius and Theodosius II (402 - 408) has DDD NNN above the busts, abbreviating Dominorum Nostrorum (meaning, in this instance, our three lords).
AR83656. Lead bulla (tag seal), cf. Boersema-Dalzell 142 (4.6g), Leukel (1995) 118 - 121, aVF, weight 9.238 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, late 4th - early 5th century A.D.; obverse laureate and draped bust of emperor facing between two smaller laureate and draped busts turned facing center and seen in profile (Theodosius I with Arcadius and Honorius?), possibly DDD NNN above; reverse domed cylindrical back with hole and channel for cord; $70.00 SALE PRICE $63.00


Roman, Conical Lead Bulla Seal, c. Late 3rd Century A.D., ANAK...

|Seals|, |Roman,| |Conical| |Lead| |Bulla| |Seal,| |c.| |Late| |3rd| |Century| |A.D.,| |ANAK...||bulla| |(tag| |seal)|
 
AR83616. Lead bulla (tag seal), cf. Boersema-Dalzell 157 (very similar size and style with inscription ΠA−NΦV), gVF, weight 3.13 g, maximum diameter 13.1 mm, die axis 0o, obverse bare-headed, draped male bust right, ANAK... upward behind; reverse conical with rounded top, pierced for cord; $120.00 SALE PRICE $108.00


Roman Syria-Palestina, Jewish, Lead Bulla Seal, 7 Branched Menorah, c. 5th - 6th Century A.D.

|Seals|, |Roman| |Syria-Palestina,| |Jewish,| |Lead| |Bulla| |Seal,| |7| |Branched| |Menorah,| |c.| |5th| |-| |6th| |Century| |A.D.||bulla| |(tag| |seal)|
A bulla (plural, bullae) is a lump of clay or lead molded around a cord and stamped with a seal that identifies the sender. With a bulla in place, a container cannot be violated without visible damage to either the bulla or the cord, revealing the tampering. Bullae depicting a menorah are known but very rare and not well documented. Dattari-Savio p. 327, 3 is a 1901 rubbing of a very similar menorah sealing. Michael Still lists two menorah sealings in his thesis on Roman seals, 1696 with a Latin inscription reverse, 1765 with a Hebrew inscription reverse. The recently published catalogue of the Vossen collection by Gert Boersema and Bill Dalzell, has two Menorah seals, numbers 181 and 182, both with blank reverses. There are also a few examples known from auctions. A FORVM member posted a bulla of this exact type from his collection on the Classical Numismatic Discussion on the Forum Ancient Coins website. We received three examples of this type on consignment, all with the same fire damage, suggesting they were found together.
JD98655. Lead bulla (tag seal), VF, chip on reverse, light earthen deposits, raised bumps from exposure to an ancient fire that heated and expanded air bubbles within the lead, weight 4.679 g, maximum diameter 15.9 mm, c. 5th - 6th century A.D.; obverse seven branched menorah with tripod base; reverse lulav, uncertain Syriac inscription; very rare; $600.00 SALE PRICE $540.00




  







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