Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome To Forum Ancient Coins!!! All Items Purchased From Forum Ancient Coins Are Guaranteed Authentic For Eternity!!! Please Call Us If You Have Questions 252-646-1958 Expert Authentication - Accurate Descriptions - Reasonable Prices - Coins From Under $10 To Museum Quality Rarities Welcome To Forum Ancient Coins!!! All Items Purchased From Forum Ancient Coins Are Guaranteed Authentic For Eternity!!! Internet Challenged? We Are Happy To Take Your Order Over The Phone 252-646-1958 Explore Our Website And Find Joy In The History, Numismatics, Art, Mythology, And Geography Of Coins!!!

× Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Recent Additions

Jun 22, 2021

Jun 20, 2021

Jun 19, 2021

Jun 17, 2021

Jun 16, 2021

Jun 13, 2021

Jun 12, 2021

Jun 11, 2021

Jun 10, 2021

Jun 07, 2021

Jun 06, 2021

Jun 05, 2021
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |Roman Republic||View Options:  |  |  | 

Coins of the Roman Republic
Roman Republic, L. Calpurnius Piso L.f. Frugi, 90 B.C.

|99-50| |B.C.|, |Roman| |Republic,| |L.| |Calpurnius| |Piso| |L.f.| |Frugi,| |90| |B.C.||denarius|NEW
This issue was minted to support the war with the Marsic Confederation.
RR97637. Silver denarius, Sydenham 665m, RSC I Calpurnia 11, Crawford 340/1, SRCV I 235, aEF, toned, flow lines, die wear/cracks, weight 3.989 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 45o, Rome mint, 90 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right, hair in long ringlets, A below chin, two pellets behind; reverse L PISO FRVGI, naked horseman galloping right, holding palm frond, F above; $240.00 (€196.80)


Roman Republic, Gnaeus Pompey Junior, Imperator, Eldest Son of Pompey the Great, Executed in 45 B.C.

|Pompeians|, |Roman| |Republic,| |Gnaeus| |Pompey| |Junior,| |Imperator,| |Eldest| |Son| |of| |Pompey| |the| |Great,| |Executed| |in| |45| |B.C.||as|
After the murder of his father, Gnaeus Pompey Magnus Junior and his brother Sextus joined the resistance against Caesar in Africa. Together with Metellus Scipio, Cato the Younger and other senators, they prepared to oppose Caesar and his army. Caesar defeated Metellus Scipio and Cato, who subsequently committed suicide, at the Battle of Thapsus in 46 B.C. Gnaeus escaped to the Balearic Islands, where he joined Sextus. Together with Titus Labienus, former general in Caesar's army, the Pompey brothers crossed over to the Hispania, where they raised yet another army. Caesar soon followed and, on 17 March 45 B.C., the armies met in the battle of Munda. Both armies were large and led by able generals. The battle was closely fought, but eventually a cavalry charge by Caesar turned events to his side. In the battle and the panicked escape that followed, Titus Labienus and an estimated 30,000 men of the Pompeian side died. Gnaeus and Sextus managed to escape once again. However, this time, supporters were difficult to find because it was now clear Caesar had won the civil war. Within a few weeks, Gnaeus Pompeius was caught and executed for treason.
RR97393. Bronze as, Crawford 471/1, Sydenham 1040, RPC I 486, BMCRR Spain 84, Russo RBW, 1646, Sear CRI 53, Cohen I 16, SRCV I 1386, aF/F, dark patina, red earthen deposits, porous, scratches, broken - 1/5 missing, weight 17.973 g, maximum diameter 31.8 mm, die axis 270o, Hispania, Cordoba mint, summer 46 - spring 45 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Janus, I (mark of value) above; reverse war galley prow right, CN MAG (MA ligate) above, I (mark of value) right, IMP below (off flan); ex Soler y Llach (Barcelona); $130.00 (€106.60)


Roman Republic, 4th Century B.C., Aes Formatum, Domed Disk Ingot Fragment

|before| |150| |B.C.|, |Roman| |Republic,| |4th| |Century| |B.C.,| |Aes| |Formatum,| |Domed| |Disk| |Ingot| |Fragment||Aes| |Formatum|
In Italy, as with other nations, early trade used a system of barter. Aes rude (Latin: "rough bronze"), used perhaps as early as the early 8th century B.C., was the earliest metal proto-currency in central Italy. In the 5th century B.C., bronze replaced cattle as the primary measure of value in trade. Called aes formatum by Haeberlin, this very rare bronze currency was later than the aes rude and a precursor to the issues of aes grave. Presumably, the molten bronze alloy was poured into a shallow hole in the dirt. This left a disc-shaped metal mound with a flat reverse. This specimen is a fragment of broken from a disk for a smaller transaction or to make change. A scale was necessary to measure value for commercial transactions.
LT96163. Cast bronze Aes Formatum, Haeberlin pl. 3, 1 - 12, 202g, 9.6cm, fragment, broken from a large domed ingot, "finder's" shovel marks, weight 202.1 g, maximum diameter 95.9 mm, obverse convex obverse; reverse flat reverse; $160.00 (€131.20)


Roman Republic and Central Italy, c. 5th - 4th Century B.C., Aes Rude

|before| |150| |B.C.|, |Roman| |Republic| |and| |Central| |Italy,| |c.| |5th| |-| |4th| |Century| |B.C.,| |Aes| |Rude||Aes| |Rude|
In Italy, as with other nations, early trade used a system of barter. Aes rude (Latin: "rough bronze"), used perhaps as early as the early 8th century B.C., was the earliest metal proto-currency in central Italy. In the 5th century B.C., bronze replaced cattle as the primary measure of value in trade. Aes rude are rough lumpy bronze ingots with no marks or design, some are flat and oblong, others are square, while many are irregular and shapeless. The metal is mostly copper with roughly 5% tin. Weight varies considerably with some exceeding twelve pounds and others under an ounce. Many smaller examples are fragments of broken larger specimens. A scale was necessary to measure value for commercial transactions.
LT96164. Bronze Aes Rude, cf. BMCRR I p. 1, Haeberlin pl. 1, Vecchi ICC pl. 1, Thurlow-Vecchi pl. 2, Bertol-Farac pl. 1, SRCV I 505; maximum length 58mm, weight 227g, $200.00 (€164.00)


Roman Republic and Central Italy, c. 5th - 4th Century B.C., Aes Rude Fragments

|Italy|, |Roman| |Republic| |and| |Central| |Italy,| |c.| |5th| |-| |4th| |Century| |B.C.,| |Aes| |Rude| |Fragments||Lot|
In Italy, as with other nations, early trade used a system of barter. Aes rude (Latin: "rough bronze"), used perhaps as early as the early 8th century B.C., was the earliest metal proto-currency in central Italy. In the 5th century B.C., bronze replaced cattle as the primary measure of value in trade. Aes rude are rough lumpy bronze ingots with no marks or design, some are flat and oblong, others are square, while many are irregular and shapeless. The metal is mostly copper with roughly 5% tin. Weight varies considerably with some exceeding twelve pounds and others under an ounce. Many smaller examples are fragments of broken larger specimens. A balance was necessary to measure value for commercial transactions.
LT96143. Bronze Lot, Lot of 20 aes rude fragments, cf. BMCRR I p. 1, Haeberlin pl. 1, Vecchi ICC pl. 1, Thurlow-Vecchi pl. 2, SRCV I 505, 13.908g - 65.836g, no tags or flips, actual pieces in the photograph, as-is, no returns; $500.00 (€410.00)


Lot of 26 Roman Republican Ases, c. 189 - 90 B.C.

|Roman| |Bulk| |Lots|, |Lot| |of| |26| |Roman| |Republican| |Ases,| |c.| |189| |-| |90| |B.C.||Lot|
 
LT96181. Bronze Lot, 26 Roman Republic Bronze Coins, c. 31mm, c. 24g, Fair to Good, obverse janiform head, I (mark of value) above; reverse war galley prow right, I (mark of value) above or before; unattributed to type, no tags or flips, the actual coins in the photograph, as-is, no returns; $150.00 (€123.00)


Lot of 12 Roman Republic Lead Glans Sling-Bullets, 1st Century B.C.

|Lead| |Glandes| |Sling| |Bullets|, |Lot| |of| |12| |Roman| |Republic| |Lead| |Glans| |Sling-Bullets,| |1st| |Century| |B.C.|
According to the contemporary report of Vegatius, Republican slingers had an accurate range of up to six hundred feet. The best sling ammunition was cast from lead. For a given mass, lead, being very dense, offered the minimum size and therefore minimum air resistance. Also, lead sling-bullets were small and difficult to see in flight. In some cases, the lead would be cast in a simple open mold made by pushing a finger, thumb, or sharpened stick into sand and pouring molten metal into the hole. The flat top end could later be carved to a matching shape. More frequently, they were cast in two-part molds. Sling-bullets were made in a variety of shapes including an ellipsoidal form closely resembling an acorn; possibly the origin of the Latin word for lead sling-bullet: glandes plumbeae (literally leaden acorns) or simply glandes (meaning acorns, singular glans). The most common shape by far was biconical, resembling the shape of an almond or an American football. Why the almond shape was favored is unknown. Possibly there was some aerodynamic advantage, but it seems equally likely that there was a more prosaic reason, such as the shape being easy to extract from a mold, or that it will rest in a sling cradle with little danger of rolling out. Almond-shaped lead sling-bullets were typically about 35 millimeters (1.4 in) long and about 20 millimeters (0.8 in) wide.
LT96131. Lot of 12 large almond shape lead sling bullets, c. 50g, 33 - 44mm long, workshop made, cast in a two part mold, found in Spain, the actual sling bullets in the photo; $240.00 (€196.80)


Roman Republic and Central Italy, Middle 5th - 4th Century B.C., Aes Rude

|before| |150| |B.C.|, |Roman| |Republic| |and| |Central| |Italy,| |Middle| |5th| |-| |4th| |Century| |B.C.,| |Aes| |Rude||Aes| |Formatum|
In Italy, as with other nations, early trade used a system of barter. Aes rude (Latin: "rough bronze"), used perhaps as early as the early 8th century B.C., was the earliest metal proto-currency in central Italy. In the 5th century B.C., bronze replaced cattle as the primary measure of value in trade. Aes rude are rough lumpy bronze ingots with no marks or design, some are flat and oblong, others are square, while many are irregular and shapeless. The metal is mostly copper with roughly 5% tin. Weight varies considerably with some exceeding twelve pounds and others under an ounce. Many smaller examples are fragments of broken larger specimens. A scale was necessary to measure value for commercial transactions.
RR95747. Bronze Aes Formatum, cf. BMCRR I p. 1, Haeberlin pl. 1, Vecchi ICC pl. 1, Thurlow-Vecchi pl. 2, Bertol-Farac pl. 1, SRCV I 505; maximum length 63.5mm, weight 215.456g, c. 5th - 4th Century B.C.; $220.00 (€180.40)


Roman Republic, Matienus, c. 179 - 170 B.C.

|before| |150| |B.C.|, |Roman| |Republic,| |Matienus,| |c.| |179| |-| |170| |B.C.||quadrans|
In 178 B.C., the praetor Lucius Postumius Albinus celebrated a triumph in Rome after conquering the Vaccaei and Lusitani during his time as Roman commander in the province of Hispania Ulterior.
RR93754. Bronze quadrans, Crawford 162/6b, Sydenham 321g, BMCRR Italy 410, Russo RBW 717, SRCV I 1096, VF, rough from corrosion, edge cracks, pre-strike casting seam, squared flan resulting from cuts to remove pre-stike casting sprues, weight 7.276 g, maximum diameter 20.7 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 179 - 170 B.C.; obverse head of Hercules right, wearing Nemean Lion's scalp headdress, three pellets (mark of value, 3 uncia) behind; reverse prow of a galley right, ROMA above, MAT ligature right, three pellets (mark of value, 3 uncia) below; from the Errett Bishop Collection; scarce; $100.00 (€82.00)


Osco-Latin, Central Italy, Late 4th - Early 3rd Century B.C.

|Italy|, |Osco-Latin,| |Central| |Italy,| |Late| |4th| |-| |Early| |3rd| |Century| |B.C.||Aes| |Formatum|
 
GA96779. Cast bronze Aes Formatum, cf. Fallai IAPN 8, pl. 6, 2-2c; Alvarez-Burgos P28; Thurlow-Vecchi -, Fair, weight 13.617 g, maximum diameter 23.7 mm, uncertain Osco-Latin mint, late 4th - early 3rd century B.C.; cast from a bipod shell; $90.00 (€73.80)










REFERENCES|

Banti, A. & L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappιes sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 1: Pompey to Domitian. (Paris, 1880).
Crawford, M. Roman Republican Coinage. (Cambridge, 1974).
Grueber, H.A. Coins of the Roman Republic in The British Museum. (London, 1910).
Haeberlin, E. J. Aes Grave. Das Schwergeld Roms und Mittelitaliens. (Frankfurt, 1910).
Rutter, N.K. ed. Historia Numorum. Italy. (London, 2001).
Seaby, H.A., D. Sear, & R. Loosley. Roman Silver Coins, Volume I, The Republic to Augustus. (London, 1989).
Sear, D. R. The History and Coinage of the Roman Imperators 49 - 27 BC. (London, 1998).
Sear, D. R. Roman Coins and Their Values, Volume One, The Republic and the Twelve Caesars 280 BC - AD 86. (London, 2000).
Stannard, C. The local coinages of Central Italy in the late Roman Republic: provisional catalogue, Oct 2007.
Sydenham, E. Aes Grave, a Study of the Cast Coinages of Rome and Central Italy. (London, 1926).
Sydenham, E. The Coinage of the Roman Republic. (London, 1952).
Thurlow, B. and I. Vecchi. Italian Cast Coinage. (Dorchester, 1979).

Catalog current as of Wednesday, June 23, 2021.
Page created in 1.188 seconds.
All coins are guaranteed for eternity