Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome To Forum Ancient Coins!!! All Items Purchased From Forum Ancient Coins Are Guaranteed Authentic For Eternity!!! Please Call Us If You Have Questions 252-646-1958 or 252-497-2724 Expert Authentication - Accurate Descriptions - Reasonable Prices - Coins From Under $10 To Museum Quality Rarities Welcome To Forum Ancient Coins!!! All Items Purchased From Forum Ancient Coins Are Guaranteed Authentic For Eternity!!! Internet Challenged? We Are Happy To Take Your Order Over The Phone 252-646-1958 Explore Our Website And Find Joy In The History, Numismatics, Art, Mythology, And Geography Of Coins!!!

×Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
New & Reduced

Dec 05, 2023

Dec 04, 2023

Dec 03, 2023

Dec 02, 2023

Dec 01, 2023

Nov 30, 2023

Nov 29, 2023

Nov 28, 2023

Nov 24, 2023

Nov 23, 2023

Nov 22, 2023

Nov 21, 2023
Medieval & Modern Coins

Nov 20, 2023
Medieval & Modern Coins

Nov 19, 2023

Nov 18, 2023

Nov 17, 2023
Medieval & Modern Coins

Nov 16, 2023
Medieval & Modern Coins

Nov 15, 2023
Medieval & Modern Coins

Jun 16, 2023

Feb 08, 2023

Feb 05, 2023
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Judean & Biblical Coins| ▸ |Herodian Dynasty||View Options:  |  |  | 

Herodian Dynasty, 37 B.C. - 92 A.D.

The Herodian dynasty was a royal dynasty of Idumaean (Edomite) descent, ruling the Herodian Kingdom and later the Herodian Tetrarchy, as a vassal state of the Roman Empire. The Herodian dynasty began with Herod the Great, who assumed the throne of Judea, with Roman support bringing down the century long Hasmonean Kingdom. His kingdom lasted until his death in 4 B.C., when it was divided between his sons as a Tetrarchy, which lasted for about 10 years. Most of those tetrarchies, including Judea proper, were incorporated into the Roman Judaea Province from 6 A.D., though limited Herodian de facto kingship continued until Agrippa I's death in 44 A.D. and nominal title of kingship continued until 92 A.D., when the last Herodian monarch, Agrippa II, died and Rome assumed full power over his domain.

Judean Kingdom, Herod the Great, 37 - 4 B.C.

|Herod| |the| |Great|, |Judean| |Kingdom,| |Herod| |the| |Great,| |37| |-| |4| |B.C.||prutah|
Herod's most famous and ambitious project was his magnificent expansion of the Second Temple in Jerusalem in 20 - 19 B.C. Although work on out-buildings continued another eighty years, the new Temple was finished in a year and a half. To comply with religious law, Herod employed 1,000 priests as masons and carpenters. The temple was destroyed in 70 A.D. Today, only the four retaining walls of the Temple Mount remain standing, including the Western Wall.
JD113605. Bronze prutah, cf. Meshorer TJC 59c; Hendin 6219a; Sofaer 30; SNG ANS 206; BMC Palestine p. 224, 44; HGC 10 662, aF, dark patina, earthen deposits, sprue cuts, weight 1.488 g, maximum diameter 13.6 mm, die axis 0o, Jerusalem mint, 21 - 12 B.C.; obverse HPW BACI (or similar, Greek abbreviation: of King Herod), anchor; reverse two cornucopias splayed outward, adorned with ribbons, caduceus between horns, pellets above; $50.00 (47.00)


Judean Kingdom, Herod the Great, 37 - 4 B.C.

|Herod| |the| |Great|, |Judean| |Kingdom,| |Herod| |the| |Great,| |37| |-| |4| |B.C.||prutah|
We have a much better one with Hendin certificate in the shop for $100. It was $110 and was just reduced after six months on the site. I think this is a $100 coin.

Herod's most famous and ambitious project was his magnificent expansion of the Second Temple in Jerusalem in 20 - 19 B.C. Although work on out-buildings continued another eighty years, the new Temple was finished in a year and a half. To comply with religious law, Herod employed 1,000 priests as masons and carpenters. The temple was destroyed in 70 A.D. Today, only the four retaining walls of the Temple Mount remain standing, including the Western Wall.
JD113041. Bronze prutah, Meshorer TJC p. 222 & pl. 45, 52 (same rev. die); Hendin 6213 (S, pl. 21 same rev. die ); HGC 10 657 (S); RPC I 4906 var. (cross inside diadem), F, well centered, uneven strike with part of legend unstruck, rev. edge beveled, sprue cuts, small sprue remnant, weight 1.553 g, maximum diameter 16.1 mm, Jerusalem mint, c. 27 B.C.; obverse HPWΔ BAΣIΛ (or similar, Greek abbreviation: of King Herod), closed diadem, cross below; reverse tripod table with curved legs on an exergue line, within dot border, no palm fronds; references say this type is scarce but we think rare - first specimen of this type handled by FORVM, only three sale of this type are recorded on Coin Archives for the last two decades; rare; $170.00 (159.80)


Judean Kingdom, Herod the Great, 37 - 4 B.C.

|Herod| |the| |Great|, |Judean| |Kingdom,| |Herod| |the| |Great,| |37| |-| |4| |B.C.||prutah|
Josephus writes that Herod the Great (father of Archelaus) was in Jericho at the time of his death. Just prior to this final trip to Jericho, Herod had placed a golden eagle over the Temple entrance. Perceived as blasphemous, protesters chopped down the eagle with axes. Two teachers and approximately 40 youths were arrested for this act and immolated.
JD113042. Bronze prutah, Hendin 6216 (S); Meshorer TJC 55; Sofaer p. 259, 50; HGC 10 666 (S), F, green patina, earthen deposits, casting sprue, weight 0.935 g, maximum diameter 14.9 mm, Jerusalem mint, c. 27 - 24 B.C.; obverse HPΩΔOY BACIΛEΩΣ (Greek: of King Herod), tripod table with curved legs, shallow bowl or plate upon it; reverse crossed palm fronds in a circle; very scarce; $110.00 (103.40)


Judean Kingdom, Herod the Great, 37 - 4 B.C.

|Herod| |the| |Great|, |Judean| |Kingdom,| |Herod| |the| |Great,| |37| |-| |4| |B.C.||prutah|
Herod's most famous and ambitious project was his magnificent expansion of the Second Temple in Jerusalem in 20 - 19 B.C. Although work on out-buildings continued another eighty years, the new Temple was finished in a year and a half. To comply with religious law, Herod employed 1,000 priests as masons and carpenters. The temple was destroyed in 70 A.D. Today, only the four retaining walls of the Temple Mount remain standing, including the Western Wall.
JD113035. Bronze prutah, Meshorer TJC 59c; Hendin 6219a; Sofaer 30; SNG ANS 206; BMC Palestine p. 224, 44; HGC 10 662, Choice aVF, broad flan, full legend, green patina, highlighting earthen deposits, sprue cuts, weight 1.620 g, maximum diameter 15.5 mm, die axis 180o, Jerusalem mint, 21 - 12 B.C.; obverse HPW BACI (Greek abbreviation: of King Herod), anchor; reverse two cornucopias splayed outward, adorned with ribbons, caduceus between horns, pellets above; $150.00 (141.00)


Judean Kingdom, Herod the Great, 37 - 4 B.C.

|Herod| |the| |Great|, |Judean| |Kingdom,| |Herod| |the| |Great,| |37| |-| |4| |B.C.||lepton|
This was the first Jewish coin type to feature a graven image - the golden eagle Herod erected above the gate of the Temple. After their Pharisee teachers declared it was idolatrous, a group of young men tore down and smashed the golden eagle. Forty of them, along with their teachers, were captured and brought before Herod. They confessed, explaining they were upholding the laws of Moses. Herod had teachers and leaders burned alive, and all the participants were executed.
JD111430. Bronze lepton, Hendin 6221, Meshorer TJC 66, RPC I 4909, Sofaer 56, HGC 10 669, F, green patina, highlighting earthen deposits, remnant of casting sprue, reverse off center, weight 0.956 g, maximum diameter 13.5 mm, die axis 45o, Jerusalem mint, c. 22 - 12 B.C.; obverse BACIΛ HPWΔ (Greek abbreviation: of King Herod), cornucopia; reverse eagle standing right, head right, wings closed; $150.00 (141.00)


Judean Kingdom, Herod the Great, 37 - 4 B.C.

|Herod| |the| |Great|, |Judean| |Kingdom,| |Herod| |the| |Great,| |37| |-| |4| |B.C.||prutah|
Herod's most famous and ambitious project was his magnificent expansion of the Second Temple in Jerusalem in 20 - 19 B.C. Although work on out-buildings continued another eighty years, the new Temple was finished in a year and a half. To comply with religious law, Herod employed 1,000 priests as masons and carpenters. The temple was destroyed in 70 A.D. Today, only the four retaining walls of the Temple Mount remain standing, including the Western Wall.
JD111425. Bronze prutah, Meshorer TJC 59a; SNG ANS 216; BMC Palestine p. 224, 40; HGC 10 660; Hendin 6219a var. (HPW BACI); Sofaer 30 var. (same), F, dark patina, earthen deposits, off center, weight 1.601 g, maximum diameter 15.3 mm, die axis 0o, Jerusalem mint, c. 21 - 12 B.C.; obverse HPWΔ BACI (Greek abbreviation: of King Herod), anchor; reverse two cornucopias splayed outward, adorned with ribbons, caduceus between horns, five pellets above; $110.00 (103.40)


Judean Kingdom, Herod the Great, 37 - 4 B.C.

|Herod| |the| |Great|, |Judean| |Kingdom,| |Herod| |the| |Great,| |37| |-| |4| |B.C.||prutah|
Herod's most famous and ambitious project was his magnificent expansion of the Second Temple in Jerusalem in 20 - 19 B.C. Although work on out-buildings continued another eighty years, the new Temple was finished in a year and a half. To comply with religious law, Herod employed 1,000 priests as masons and carpenters. The temple was destroyed in 70 A.D. Today, only the four retaining walls of the Temple Mount remain standing, including the Western Wall.
JD111427. Bronze prutah, Meshorer TJC 59a; SNG ANS 216; BMC Palestine p. 224, 40; HGC 10 660; Hendin 6219a var. (HPW BACI); Sofaer 30 var. (same), F, green patina, earthen encrustation, remnant of casting sprue, porosity, rev. edge beveled, weight 1.562 g, maximum diameter 13.9 mm, die axis 0o, Jerusalem mint, c. 21 - 12 B.C.; obverse HPWΔ BACI (Greek abbreviation: of King Herod), anchor; reverse two cornucopias splayed outward, adorned with ribbons, caduceus between horns, five pellets above; $90.00 (84.60)


Herod Archelaus, Ethnarch of Samaria, Judea, and Idumea, 4 B.C. - 6 A.D.

|Herod| |Archelaus|, |Herod| |Archelaus,| |Ethnarch| |of| |Samaria,| |Judea,| |and| |Idumea,| |4| |B.C.| |-| |6| |A.D.||prutah|
Grapes, the vine and wine were an important part of the ancient economy and ritual. Grapes were brought to the Temple as offerings of the first-fruits and wine was offered upon the altar. The vine and grapes decorated the sacred vessels in the sanctuary and a golden vine with clusters of grapes stood at its entrance.
JD111431. Bronze prutah, Hendin 6227; Meshorer TJC 73; BMC Palestine p. 232, 10; SNG Cop 69; Sofaer 81; RPC I 4917, F, earthen deposits, off center, edge split, sprue remnant, obv. edge beveled, weight 1.937 g, maximum diameter 16.0156 mm, die axis 135o, Jerusalem mint, 4 B.C. - 6 A.D.; obverse HPΩΔOY (Greek: of Herod), bunch of grapes, leaf on left; reverse EΘNOPXOY (Greek: Ethnarch), tall helmet with crest and neck straps viewed from the front, small caduceus in lower left field; $90.00 (84.60)


Judean Kingdom, Herod the Great, 37 - 4 B.C.

|Herod| |the| |Great|, |Judean| |Kingdom,| |Herod| |the| |Great,| |37| |-| |4| |B.C.||prutah|
Herod's most famous and ambitious project was his magnificent expansion of the Second Temple in Jerusalem in 20 - 19 B.C. Although work on out-buildings continued another eighty years, the new Temple was finished in a year and a half. To comply with religious law, Herod employed 1,000 priests as masons and carpenters. The temple was destroyed in 70 A.D. Today, only the four retaining walls of the Temple Mount remain standing, including the Western Wall.
JD112373. Bronze prutah, cf. Hendin 6219a; Meshorer TJC 59c; Sofaer 30; SNG ANS 206; BMC Palestine p. 224, 44; HGC 10 662, aVF, off center, weight 1.688 g, maximum diameter 14.2 mm, die axis 270o, Jerusalem mint, 21 - 12 B.C.; obverse HPW BACI (Greek abbreviation: of King Herod), anchor; reverse two cornucopias splayed outward, adorned with ribbons, caduceus between horns, pellets above; $90.00 (84.60)


Judean Kingdom, Herod the Great, 37 - 4 B.C.

|Herod| |the| |Great|, |Judean| |Kingdom,| |Herod| |the| |Great,| |37| |-| |4| |B.C.||prutah|
Herod's most famous and ambitious project was his magnificent expansion of the Second Temple in Jerusalem in 20 - 19 B.C. Although work on out-buildings continued another eighty years, the new Temple was finished in a year and a half. To comply with religious law, Herod employed 1,000 priests as masons and carpenters. The temple was destroyed in 70 A.D. Today, only the four retaining walls of the Temple Mount remain standing, including the Western Wall.
JD111756. Bronze prutah, Ariel-Fontanille type 15, group 6 (O1nl/R1nl); Meshorer TJC 59; Hendin 6219; RPC I 4910; HGC 10 662, aVF, slightly off center, weight 1.302 g, maximum diameter 14.5 mm, Jerusalem mint, 21 - 12 B.C.; obverse anchor, no legend; reverse two cornucopias splayed outward, adorned with ribbons, caduceus between horns, pellets above; ex CNG e-auction 510 (23 Feb 2022), lot 307; ex Dr. Jay M. Galst Collection; ex Herb Kreindler (Feb 1988); rare variant; $90.00 (84.60)










REFERENCES

Ariel, D. & J. Fontanille. The Coins of Herod: A Modern Analysis and Die Classification. (Leiden, 2012).
Burnett, A., M. Amandry & P. Ripolls. Roman Provincial Coinage I: From the death of Caesar to the death of Vitellius (44 BC-AD 69). (London, 1992 & supplements).
Fontanille, J. Menorah Coin Project, website: http://menorahcoinproject.com/
Hendin, D. Guide to Biblical Coins, 6th Edition. (Amphora, 2021).
Hill, G. Catalogue of Greek Coins in the British Museum: Palestine. (London, 1914).
Hoover, O. Handbook of Coins of the Southern Levant: Phoenicia, Southern Koile Syria (Including Judaea), and Arabia, Fifth to First Centuries BC. HGC 10. (Lancaster, PA, 2010).
Kindler, A. Coins of the Land of Israel. (Jerusalem, 1974).
Maltiel-Gerstenfeld, J. 260 Years of Ancient Jewish Coinage. (Tel Aviv, 1982).
Meshorer, Y. Ancient Jewish Coinage. (New York, 1982).
Meshorer, Y. A Treasury of Jewish Coins from the Persian Period to Bar Kokhba. (Jerusalem, 2001).
Meshorer, Y., et al. Coins of the Holy Land: The Abraham and Marian Sofaer Collection at the American Numismatic Society and The Israel Museum. ACNAC 8. (New York, 2013).
Reinach, S. Jewish Coins. (London, 1903).
Rogers, E. Handy Guide To Jewish Coins. (London, 1914).
Roman Provincial Coins (RPC) Online - http://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/.
Samuels, C., P. Rynearson & Y. Meshorer. The Numismatic Legacy of the Jews as depicted by a distinguished American Collection. (New York, 2000).
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Volume 2: Asia and Africa. (London, 1979).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 7: Cyprus to India. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, USA, The Collection of the American Numismatic Society, Part 6: Palestine - South Arabia. (New York, 1981).

Catalog current as of Tuesday, December 5, 2023.
Page created in 1.672 seconds.
All coins are guaranteed for eternity