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   View Categories Home > Catalog > |Greek Coins| > |Hellenistic Monarchies| > |Seleucid Kingdom| > GY95972
Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus III the Great, c. 223 - 187 B.C.
|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Antiochus| |III| |the| |Great,| |c.| |223| |-| |187| |B.C.|, At the age of eighteen, Antiochus III inherited a disorganized state. Much of Anatolia had been lost and the easternmost provinces had revolted and broken away. After some initial defeats, Antiochus took Judaea from Ptolemaic Egypt and then conquered Anatolia, earning him the epithet "the Great." In 192 B.C. Antiochus invaded Greece with a 10,000-man army, and was elected the commander in chief of the Aetolian League. In 191 B.C., however, the Romans routed him at Thermopylae, forcing him to withdraw to Anatolia. The Romans followed up by invading Anatolia and defeating him again. By the Treaty of Apamea 188 B.C., Antiochus abandoned all territory north and west of the Taurus, most of which the Roman Republic gave either to Rhodes or to the Attalid ruler Eumenes II, its allies. Many Greek cities were left free. As a consequence of this blow to the Seleucid power, the provinces which had recovered by Antiochus, reasserted their independence. Antiochus mounted a fresh eastern expedition. He died while pillaging a temple of Bel at Elyma´s, Persia, in 187 B.C.
GY95972. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber I 967 var. (one diadem end upward), Mektepini Hoard 636 var. (same), HGC 9 447g (R2), VF, light bumps/marks, slightest corrosion/porosity, Western Asia Minor, uncertain mint, weight 16.983g, maximum diameter 28.1mm, die axis 0o, c. 203 - 187 B.C.; obverse Antiochos' diademed head right, youthful, jutting nose, pursed lips, diadem ends straight down behind head; reverse Apollo seated left on omphalos, nude, examining arrow in right hand, resting left hand on bow grounded behind, bow ornamented with two sets of two disks, BAΣIΛEΩΣ (king) downward on right, ANTIOXOY downward on left, monograms outer left and right; from the Errett Bishop Collection; very rare; $400.00











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