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   View Categories Home > Catalog > |Roman Coins| > |The Adoptive Emperors| > |Antoninus Pius| > SH21931
Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D.
|Antoninus| |Pius|, |Antoninus| |Pius,| |August| |138| |-| |7| |March| |161| |A.D.|, Certificate of Authenticity issued by David R. Sear.

A rare and interesting type. LIBERALITAS coins commemorate largesses, distributions of money to the people of Rome, usually made upon important events or the return of the emperor after a longer absence. This coin commemorates Antoninus' seventh Liberalitas, perhaps on the occasion of the birth of a son to Marcus and Faustina in 152.

RIC only lists a draped and cuirassed bust obverse, and describes the reverse as Liberalitas holding an account board and a rod. The description must be based on a poorly preserved specimen, as our coin (and others) clearly show a male holding a simple fasces (rods bundled with an axe as seen on the back of a U.S. dime). The other object should be regarded more as a banner, on which dots were painted equal to the number of aurei distributed to each citizen. Another theory suggests it is actually a wooden shovel, with shallow pits which was used to draw an exact number of coins from a chest. True or not, we think it would be great fun to shovel through thousands of aureii.
SH21931. Gold aureus, RIC III 229 var., Cohen II 520 var., Choice gVF, Rome mint, weight 7.276g, maximum diameter 19.8mm, die axis 180o, 152 - 153 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XVI, laureate bust right, very slight drapery on left shoulder; reverse LIBERALITAS VII COS IIII, Lictor, standing facing, head left, wearing cap and chlamys, fasces (rods bundled with an axe) in right, tessera in left; nice style, full circle centering on both obverse and reverse; very rare; SOLD











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