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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |Crisis & Decline| ▸ |Volusian||View Options:  |  |  | 

Volusian, c. November 251 - July or August 253 A.D.

Gaius Vibius Afinius Gallus Vedumnianus Volusian was the son of Trebonianus Gallus and was given the rank of Caesar when his father became emperor. After emperor Hostilian was killed, he was raised to the rank of Augustus. He was assassinated along with his father in 253 A.D.

|Volusian|, |Volusian,| |c.| |November| |251| |-| |July| |or| |August| |253| |A.D.||antoninianus|
Adventus reverse types commemorate the emperor's arrival at Rome, either at the commencement of his reign or on his return from a distance. They may also refer to his arrival in some other city or province of the empire. At their accession, emperors were not conveyed in a chariot nor in any other vehicle, but went on horseback or on foot when they made their first public entry into the capital of the Roman world.
RS93314. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV 224(a) (R), RSC IV 2b, SRCV III 9738, Hunter III - (p. cviii), VF, attractive style, well centered, darkened bronze and turquoise encrustations, flan cracks, weight 2.800 g, maximum diameter 22.0 mm, die axis 0o, 3rd officina, Antioch mint, 252 A.D.; obverse IMP C V AF GAL VOLVSIANO AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind, three pellets below; reverse ADVENTVS AVG (arrival of the Emperor), Trebonianus Gallus on horseback left, raising right hand in salute, long scepter in left hand, paludamentum flying behind, horse's right foreleg raised; from the Errett Bishop Collection; rare; $220.00 SALE |PRICE| $198.00
 


Volusian, c. November 251 - July or August 253 A.D., Neapolis, Samaria

|Volusian|, |Volusian,| |c.| |November| |251| |-| |July| |or| |August| |253| |A.D.,| |Neapolis,| |Samaria||AE| |26|
Neapolis, Samaria, the biblical Shechemis, is now Nablus, Israel. It is the site of Joseph's Tomb and Jacob's well. Jesus spoke here to a Samaritan woman. Neapolis is home to about half the remaining worldwide Samaritan population of 600.
SH52130. Bronze AE 26, Rosenberger 125, Hendin 882, SNG Cop -, SNG ANS -, Nice aVF, weight 14.397 g, maximum diameter 25.7 mm, die axis 180o, Neapolis (Nablus, Israel) mint, 251 - 253 A.D.; obverse [AVT KAI Γ OVIB TPEBO VOΛOVCIANOC] (or similar), laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse ΦΛ NEAC ΠOΛEΩC, Mount Gerizim surmounted by Samaritan temple and altar, stairway to temple, colonnade below, all supported by facing eagle with wings spread; rare; SOLD


|Volusian|, |Volusian,| |c.| |November| |251| |-| |July| |or| |August| |253| |A.D.||sestertius|
Liberalitas coin types attest to occasions when the emperor has displayed his generosity towards the people by a distribution to them of money, provisions, or both. The first mention of Liberalitas was on coins of Hadrian. It was a type frequently repeated by the succeeding emperors. Indeed these instances of imperial generosity are more carefully recorded on coins than they are by history. Liberality is personified by the image of a woman, holding in one hand a counting board, or square tablet with a handle on which are cut a certain number of holes. These boards were used to quickly count the proper number of coins or other items for distribution to each person. In the other hand she holds a cornucopia, to indicate the prosperity of the state and the abundance of wheat contained in the public graineries.
RB13707. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV Treb. Gallus 254a, Cohen V 50, Hunter III 43, SRCV III 9789, VF, weight 19.898 g, maximum diameter 29.1 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 251 - 253 A.D.; obverse IMP CAE C VIB VOLVSIANO AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse LIBERALITAS AVGG, Liberalitas standing half-left, coin counting board in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, S - C flanking across lower half of field; very rare; SOLD







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OBVERSE| LEGENDS|

CVIBIOVOLVSIANOCAES
IMCAFGALVENDVOLVSIANOAVG
IMCVAFGALVENDVOLVSIANAVG
IMCVAFGMVENDVOLVSIANOAVG
IMPCAECVIBVOLVSIANOAVG
IMPCAECVIBVOLVSIANVSAVG
IMPCCVIBVOLVSIANVSAVG
IMPCVAFGALVALVENDVOLVSIANVSAVG
IMPCVAFGALVENDVOLVSIANOAVG
IMPCVAFGALVENDVOLVSIANVSAVG
IMPCVAFGMVOLVSIANOAVG
IMPCVOLVSIANOAVG
IMPCVOLVSIANVSAVG


REFERENCES|

Banti, A. & L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Calicó, X. The Roman Avrei, Vol. Two: From Didius Julianus to Constantius I, 193 AD - 335 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappées sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 5: Gordian I to Valerian II. (Paris, 1885).
Mattingly, H., E. Sydenham & C. Sutherland. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol IV, From Pertinax to Uranius Antoninus. (London, 1986).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. III. Pertinax to Aemilian. (Oxford, 1977).
Seaby, H. & D. Sear. Roman Silver Coins, Vol. IV, Gordian III to Postumus. (London, 1982).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values III, The Accession of Maximinus I to the Death of Carinus AD 235 - AD 285. (London, 2005).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

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