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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Medieval & Modern Coins| ▸ |Austria||View Options:  |  |  | 

Coins of Austria

The origins of Austria date back to the time of the Roman Empire when a Celtic kingdom was conquered by the Romans in approximately 15 B.C. and later became Noricum, a Roman province, in the mid-1st century AD?an area which mostly encloses today's Austria. In 788 A.D., the Frankish king Charlemagne conquered the area and introduced Christianity. Under the native Habsburg dynasty, Austria became one of the great powers of Europe. In 1867, the Austrian Empire was reformed into Austria-Hungary. The Austro-Hungarian Empire collapsed in 1918 with the end of World War I. The First Austrian Republic was established in 1919. In the 1938 Anschluss, Austria was occupied and annexed by Nazi Germany. This lasted until the end of World War II in 1945, after which Austria was occupied by the Allies and its former democratic constitution was restored. In 1955, the Austrian State Treaty re-established Austria as a sovereign state, ending the occupation. In the same year, the Austrian Parliament created the Declaration of Neutrality which declared that the country would become permanently neutral.

Austria, Leopold V, Archduke of Further Austria, 1626 - 1632

|Austria|, |Austria,| |Leopold| |V,| |Archduke| |of| |Further| |Austria,| |1626| |-| |1632|, |Thaler|
Leopold V, Archduke of Further Austria, Bishop of Passau and of Strasbourg, until he resigned to get married. was the son of Archduke Charles II of Inner Austria, and the younger brother of Emperor Ferdinand II. The Archduchy of Austria was a major principality of the Holy Roman Empire and the nucleus of the Habsburg Monarchy. With its capital at Vienna, the archduchy was centered at the Empire's southeastern periphery. The obverse legend abbreviates Latin, "Leopoldus Dei Gratia Archidux Austriae Dux Burgundiae Sacrae Caesaraea Majestatis et Reliquorum." The reverse legend abbreviates Latin, "Archiducum Gubernator Plenarius Comes Tirolis."
WO95139. Silver Thaler, SCWC KM 264.5, Moser-Tursky 422, Davenport 3330, Voglhuber 175, Choice EF, toned, weight 28.496 g, maximum diameter 42.8 mm, die axis 0o, Hall mint, 1621; obverse LEOPOLDVS D:G:ARCHID:AUSTRIAE DVX BVRG:S:CAES:M:ET RELIQ:, bare-headed, mantled bust right, 16-Z1 divided across field; reverse ARCHIDVC:GVBERNATOR PLENARIVS COM:TIROL: Archiducum pilot plenary count of Tyrol, crowned composite arms with ornaments; $600.00 SALE |PRICE| $540.00
 


Archbishopric Salzburg, Adalbert III von Böhmen, 1168 - 1177 and 1183 - 1200 A.D.

|Austria|, |Archbishopric| |Salzburg,| |Adalbert| |III| |von| |Böhmen,| |1168| |-| |1177| |and| |1183| |-| |1200| |A.D.|, |pfennig|
Adalbert, son of King Ladislas II of Bohemia and Gertrude of Austria; grand-son of Emperor Henry IV, was elected Archbishop of Salzburg, Austria in 1168. The position included secular power as well as ecclesiastical. The Emperor, offended when Adalbert exercised his authority without formal approval, briefly replaced Adalbert as bishop. To gain allies Adalbert unlawfully gave away Church property; his priests petitioned for a new election, but Pope Alexander III supported him. Through a series of political maneuvers, Adalbert managed to keep his see until formally deposed in May 1174. He was re-elected on 19 Sep 1183, this time with the emperor's support. He held the see until his death.
ME59146. Silver pfennig, CNA Ca9, aEF, nice for type, weight 1.166 g, maximum diameter 18.6 mm, die axis 135o, Frisach mint, obverse ERIACENSIS (retrograde, S sideways), archbishop standing facing, crozier in right, key in left; reverse gable of a church with two spires, cross between them; SOLD


Archbishopric Salzburg, Adalbert III von Böhmen, 1168 - 1177 and 1183 - 1200 A.D.

|Austria|, |Archbishopric| |Salzburg,| |Adalbert| |III| |von| |Böhmen,| |1168| |-| |1177| |and| |1183| |-| |1200| |A.D.|, |pfennig|
Adalbert, son of King Ladislas II of Bohemia and Gertrude of Austria; grand-son of Emperor Henry IV, was elected Archbishop of Salzburg, Austria in 1168. The position included secular power as well as ecclesiastical. The Emperor, offended when Adalbert exercised his authority without formal approval, briefly replaced Adalbert as bishop. To gain allies Adalbert unlawfully gave away Church property; his priests petitioned for a new election, but Pope Alexander III supported him. Through a series of political maneuvers, Adalbert managed to keep his see until formally deposed in May 1174. He was re-elected on 19 Sep 1183, this time with the emperor's support. He held the see until his death.
ME66515. Silver pfennig, cf. CNA Ca9, VF, weight 1.236 g, maximum diameter 19.9 mm, die axis 90o, Frisach mint, obverse Archbishop standing facing, crozier in right hand, book in left; reverse gable of a church with two spires, cross between them; SOLD







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REFERENCES|

Corpus Nummorum Austriacorum. (Vienna, 1994-1999).
Davenport, J. The Talers of the Austrian Noble Houses. (Galesburg, 1972).
Domanig, K. Porträtmedaillen des Erzhauses österreich von Kaiser Friedrich III bis Kaiser Franz II. (Vienna, 1869).
Friedberg, A. & I. Friedberg. Gold Coins of the World, From Ancient Times to the Present. (2009).
Herinek, L. Osterreichische Münzprägungen. (Vienna, 1984).
Kenis, Y. Catalogue des Medailles et Jetons des Pays-Bas Autrichiens 1714-1794. (Bruxelles, 2000).
Krause, C. & C. Mishler. Standard Catalog of World Coins. (Iola, WI, 2010 - ).
Miller zu Aichholz, V., A. Loehr & E. Holzmair. Österreichische Münzprägungen. (Vienna, 1948).
Moser, H. & H. Tursky. Die Münzstätte Hall in Tirol. (Innsbruck, 1981).
Szego, A. The Coinage of Medieval Austria 1156 - 1521. (reprint, 1995).
Voglhuber, R. Taler und Schautaler des Erzhauses Habsburg 1484 - 1896. (Frankfurt/Main, 1971).

Catalog current as of Monday, June 1, 2020.
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