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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Gods, Non-Olympian| ▸ |Pan||View Options:  |  |  | 

Pan

Pan is usually represented in the form of a satyr, with goat's horns and a cloak of goat's skin, playing the Syrinx, or flute of seven pipes, and holding the pedum or pastoral staff. Pan was in love with the chaste nymph Syrinx. She sought help from her fellow river-nymphs and was transformed into reeds, a plant with a hollow stem. The reeds made a strong sound when the angry Pan was breathing upon them. He cut them and invented the syrinx (pan-flute).


Elagabalus, 16 May 218 - 11 March 222 A.D., Pella, Macedonia

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Pan is depicted in the pose of the life-size marble statue known as the Barberini Faun (Drunken Satyr) in the Glyptothek in Munich. A Faun is the Roman equivalent of a Greek Satyr. The position of the right arm over the head was a classical artistic convention indicating sleep. The statue is believed to have once adorned Hadrian's Mausoleum. The historian Procopius recorded that during the siege of Rome in 537 the defenders had hurled down upon the Goths the statues adorning Hadrian's Mausoleum. When discovered, the statue was heavily damaged; the right leg, parts of both hands, and parts of the head were missing. Johann Winckelmann speculated that the place of discovery and the statue's condition suggested that it had been such a projectile.Barberini Faun

RP89875. Bronze AE 25, cf. SNG ANS 629 (younger, Caracalla?), Moushmov 6476 (syrnix in field), Varbanov 3732 (R4, same), AMNG -, SNG Cop -, SNG Hunt -, BMC -, Lindgren -, Choice gF/aVF, broad flan, nice green patina, light scratches and marks, scattered minor porosity, weight 9.863 g, maximum diameter 24.6 mm, die axis 180o, Pella mint, 16 May 218 - 11 Mar 222 A.D.; obverse IMP C M AVR ANTONINVS, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse CO IVL AVS PELLA (sic), Pan seated left on rock, nude, right hand raised to top of head, left forearm leaning on syrnix on rock behind; other than SNG ANS specimen, with an obscure legend and a much different portrait which we suspect is Caracalla, this type is unpublished in the standard references, there is one specimen on Coin Archives (attributed to Caracalla in error), Wildwinds lists this type but misidentified as Moushmov 6476; extremely rare; $120.00 (Ä105.60)


Maximinus I Thrax, 20 March 235 - Late May 238 A.D., Pella, Macedonia

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Pella was founded in 399 B.C. by King Archelaus (413 - 399 B.C.) as his capital. It is best known as the historical capital of the ancient Greek kingdom of Macedon and birthplace of Alexander the Great. In 168 B.C., it was sacked by the Romans, and its treasury transported to Rome. Later the city was destroyed by an earthquake. By 180 A.D., Lucian could describe it in passing as "now insignificant, with very few inhabitants."
RP92878. Bronze AE 26, Varbanov III 3747 (R5); SNG Cop 285; Moushmov 6486; cf. BMC Macedonia p. 40, 40 (cuirassed bust); SNG ANS -; SNG Hunter -; AMNG III -, aVF, well centered, green patina, light deposits, light marks, part of reverse legend weak, weight 9.387 g, maximum diameter 25.7 mm, die axis 180o, Pella mint, 20 Mar 235 - late May 238 A.D.; obverse IMP C C IVL VER MAXIMINVS, laureate and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse COL IVL AVG PELLA, Pan seated left on rock, nude, right hand on top of head, pedum in left hand, syrnix (Pan flute) in left field ; $110.00 (Ä96.80)


Pantikapaion, Tauric Chersonesos, Thrace, c. 310 - 303 B.C.

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Pan is the Greek god of shepherds and flocks, fields, groves, mountain wilderness, and wooded glens, hunting, rustic music, theatrical criticism, and companion of the nymphs. He is connected to fertility and the season of spring. He has the hindquarters, legs, and horns of a goat and is usually represented in the form of a satyr, with a cloak of goat's skin, playing the Syrinx, or flute of seven pipes, and holding the pedum or pastoral staff.
GB91271. Bronze AE 23, SNG BM 869, SNG Cop 30, MacDonald Bosporus 69, HGC 7 113, SGCV I 1700, EF, dark patina, well centered on a tight flan, slight die wear, weight 7.650 g, maximum diameter 22.5 mm, die axis 180o, Pantikapaion (Kerch, Crimea) mint, c. 310 - 303 B.C.; obverse bearded horned head of Pan right; reverse ΠAN, forepart of griffin left, sturgeon left below; SOLD







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Catalog current as of Saturday, October 19, 2019.
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Pan