Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Please login or register to use this function! All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! Please call us if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business! Please login or register to use this function! Internet challenged? We are happy to take your order over the phone. Please call if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business!

Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show empty categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Gods, Non-Olympian ▸ AstarteView Options:  |  |  | 

Astarte

Astarte is mentioned in the Hebrew Bible as the principal goddess of the Phoenicians (Ashtoreth), representing the productive power of nature. In Phoenician mythology, she was a daughter of Sky and Earth and sister of the god El. Astarte was connected with fertility, sexuality, and war. Her symbols were the lion, the horse, the sphinx, the dove, and a star within a circle indicating the planet Venus. Her name is the second name in a Wicca energy chant: "Isis, Astarte, Diana, Hecate, Demeter, Kali, Inanna."


Valerian I, October 253 - c. June 260 A.D., Tyre, Phoenicia

Click for a larger photo
Astarte, called "Ashtroth" in Scripture, was the favorite goddess of the Sidonians, Tyrians, Philistines, and Syro-Phoenicians generally. She was associated with the Greek Aphrodite and Roman Venus Genetrix, being believed by the ancients to be the goddess of generation, as well as of beauty. Astarte was chiefly worshiped and appears on the coins of Berytus, Bostra, Sidon, and Tyre. Her image is of a young woman, wearing a tall headdress; and clothed in a tunic, high in the neck- sometimes, not reaching lower than the knees, or sometimes with a longer dress, but with one knee exposed, and one foot planted on a galley's prow.
RP77850. Bronze AE 29, Baramki AUB 283; BMC Phoenicia p. 287, 453 corr. (rev. leg.); SNG Hunterian 3431 var. (palm and murex reversed, etc.); Lingren-Kovacs 2396; SNG Cop -, F, green patina with lighter highlighting fields, reverse slightly off center, weight 14.794 g, maximum diameter 28.9 mm, die axis 0o, Tyre mint, Oct 253 - c. Jun 260 A.D.; obverse IMP C P LIC VALERIANVS AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right, from the front; reverse COL - TY-RO - MET, hexastyle temple, Tyche-Astarte standing facing within under central arch, wearing tall headdress and short tunic, right hand on trophy standing to her left, transverse long scepter in left hand, left foot on galley, being crowned by Nike on short column to her right; tree, altar, and murex shell from left to right in exergue; rare; $70.00 (Ä59.50)


Arados, Phoenicia, 128 - 127 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Ancient Arados, surrounded by massive walls on an island about 800 m long by 500 m wide, about 50 km north of Tripolis, was an important trading city with an artificial harbor on the east side toward the mainland. Its powerful navy and ships are mentioned in the monuments of Egypt and Assyria. The Biblical "Arvad" is noted as the forefather of the "Arvadites," a Canaanite people. Arados directly ruled some nearby cities on the mainland, such as Marat (Amrit today) nearly opposite the island, and held hegemony over the northern Phoenician cities from the mouth of the Orontes to the northern limits of Lebanon (similar to Sidon in the south). Under the Persians, Arwad was allowed to unite in a confederation with Sidon and Tyre, with a common council at Tripolis. In 332 B.C., Arados submitted to Alexander the Great without a struggle under her king Strato, who sent his navy to aid Alexander in the reduction of Tyre. The city received the favor of the Seleucid kings of Syria and enjoyed the right of asylum for political refugees. It is mentioned in a rescript from Rome about 138 B.C. in connection with other cities and rulers of the East, to show favor to the Jews. This was after Rome had begun to interfere in the affairs of Judea and Syria and indicates that Arwad was still of considerable importance at that time.Arados
GB88141. Bronze AE 17, Duyrat 4330 ff. (D46/-); BMC Phoenicia p. 36, 297; SNG Cop 69; Cohen DCA 770 (S); HGC 10 90, gF, dark patina, well centered reverse, light marks, weight 4.268 g, maximum diameter 17.2 mm, die axis 0o, Arados (Arwad, Syria) mint, 128 - 127 B.C.; obverse jugate busts right of Zeus, laureate, and Astarte, wearing stephane; reverse prow of galley left, figurehead of Athena Promachos holding wreath and trident, Phoenician letters nun and aleph above, Phoenician date year 132 (Aradian era) over Phoenician letter daleth below; ex Moneta Numismatic Services; $60.00 (Ä51.00)


Arados, Phoenicia, 80 - 79 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
King Tigranes the Great of Armenia ruled Syria and Phoenicia from 82 until 69 B.C. when he was defeated by Rome. Arados retained its independence, as it had previously under Ptolemaic and Seleukid domination of the region.
GB57568. Bronze AE 19, Duyrat 4517 ff.; BMC Phoenicia p. 41, 335; Cohen DCA 779, aVF, weight 6.514 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 0o, Arados (Arwad, Syria) mint, 80 - 79 B.C.; obverse bust of Astarte right, wearing stephane and veil; reverse humped bull jumping to left, head turned facing, AC over Greek monogram above, below bull: PΠ (year 180) and Phoenician letter aleph over CWM; nice near black patina with red earthen highlighting; SOLD







CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE FROM THIS CATEGORY - FORVM's PRIOR SALES



Catalog current as of Friday, February 22, 2019.
Page created in 0.752 seconds.
Astarte