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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Animals ▸ GoatView Options:  |  |  | 

Goats on Ancient Coins

Kelenderis, Cilicia, c. 410 - 375 B.C.

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Kelenderis was a port town, one of the oldest in Cilicia, described in Hellenistic and Roman sources as a small, but strong castle. The rider on the obverse may be Castor, who was not only a horse trainer but also the protector of sailors, an appropriate type for a port town.
GS86211. Silver stater, Casabonne type 4; BMC Cilicia p. 55, 25 & pl. X, 3; cf. SNG BnF 75 (KEΛEN); Celenderis Hoard-; SNG Levante -; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -, aEF, attractive style, centered on a tight flan, die wear and minor die cracks, marks, weight 10.800 g, maximum diameter 21.6 mm, die axis 30o, Celenderis mint, c. 410 - 375 B.C.; obverse young man riding sideways on horse galloping right, preparing to dismount(?), nude, whip in right hand, bridle in left hand; reverse goat crouching left on dotted exergue line, head turned looking back right, KEΛ[E?] above; very rare late issue with rider right and goat left; $1080.00 (€918.00)
 


Tarsos, Cilicia, c. 164 - 27 B.C.

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The Tyche / Sandan type was the only autonomous silver issue of Tarsos. Sandan was a Hittite-Babylonian sun, storm, or warrior god, also perhaps associated with agriculture. The Greeks equated Sandan with Herakles (Hercules). At Tarsus an annual festival honored Sandan-Herakles, which climaxed when an image of the god was burned on a funeral pyre.
GS86512. Silver drachm, cf. SNG Levante 925; SNG BnF 1295; BMC Lycaonia p. 178, 94; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -, VF, bold strike, tight flan, iridescent toning, light marks, slight porosity, weight 3.918 g, maximum diameter 16.1 mm, die axis 0o, Tarsos (Tarsus, Mersin, Turkey) mint, 164 - 27 B.C.; obverse turreted head of Tyche right, bead and reel border; reverse Sandan standing right on the back of a mythical horned and winged goat-like animal walking right, he draped and wears a high headdress, bow case and sword on his left side, right hand extended, ax in left hand; two monograms behind (off flan), TAPΣEΩN (downward on right); from the David Cannon Collection, ex Beast Coins; very rare; $360.00 (€306.00)
 


Himera, Sicily, 420 - 409 B.C.

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In 409 B.C., Carthage attacked Himera. The city was unprepared; its fortifications weak. At first they were supported about 4000 auxiliaries from Syracuse, but their general, Diocles, seized with panic for the safety of Syracuse itself, abandoned Himera. The city was utterly destroyed, its buildings, even its temples, were razed to the ground. More than 3000 prisoners were put to death by General Hannibal Mago as a human sacrifice to the memory of his grandfather General Hamilcar who had been defeated at the Battle of Himera in 480 B.C.
GB86306. Bronze hemilitron, Calciati I p. 41, 27; SNG Cop 318, SNG München 365; SNG ANS 184 var. (grasshopper control), gVF, dark patina, bumps and scratches, areas of light corrosion, earthen deposits, a little off center, weight 6.039 g, maximum diameter 19.9 mm, die axis 90o, Himera (Termini, Sicily, Italy) mint, 420 - 409 B.C.; obverse Pan on a goat prancing right, nude but for chlamys fluttering in the wind behind, preparing to blow on conch in right, thyrsus in left over shoulder, Corinthian helmet (control symbol) below; reverse HIMEPAION, Nike flying left, apluster with dangling fillets in extended right, fold of long chiton in left, six pellets (mark of value) left below arm; $310.00 (€263.50)
 


Ainos, Thrace, c. 117 - 138 A.D.

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This extremely rare type is unpublished in references and missing from major collections. The only other example we know is the referenced example sold in Nomos obolos 7. Nomos dated the type c. 280 - 200 B.C. AMNG and RPC Online IV list a similar type with both Hermes and the goat right. RPC dates that type to the 2nd Century A.D. We believe the Hermes portrait is Augusticized and has some resemblance to Hadrian. We tentatively date the type to Hadrian's reign, c. 117 - 138 A.D.
GB86124. Bronze AE 18, Nomos obolos 7 (9 Jul 2017), lot 28 (same dies); cf. AMNG 403, pl. V.26 (rev.) (Hermes and goat right, etc.); RPC Online IV temp. 4495 (=AMNG 403), F/aF, well centered, bumps and marks, corrosion, porosity, centration dimple on reverse, weight 4.132 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 180o, Ainos (Enez, Turkey) mint, c. 117 - 138 A.D.; obverse head of Hermes left, caduceus before, no centration dimple; reverse AI-NIΩN, goat standing left, centration dimple; unpublished in references, missing from major collections, extremely rare - 2nd known specimen; $180.00 (€153.00)
 


Amphipolis, Macedonia, c. 168 - 149 B.C.

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On 22 June 168 B.C., Lucius Aemilius Paullus Macedonicus won the decisive Battle of Pydna. Perseus of Macedonia was made prisoner and the Third Macedonian War ended. Paullus executed 500 Macedonians, exiled many more to Italy and confiscated their belongings in the name of Rome but according to Plutarch, keeping too much to himself. On the return to Rome in 167 BC, his legions were displeased with their share of the plunder. To keep them happy, Paullus stopped in Epirus, a kingdom suspected of sympathizing with Macedonia; 70 towns were sacked, 150,000 people enslaved, and the region was left bankrupt. Paullus' return to Rome was glorious. With the immense plunder collected in Macedonia and Epirus, he celebrated a spectacular triumph, featuring the captured king of Macedonia himself. The senate awarded him the cognomen Macedonicus.
GB83472. Bronze AE 19, BMC Macedonia p. 48, 40 - 41; AMNG III 51; SNG Cop -; SNG Evelpidis -, Nice VF, attractive style, nice green patina, weight 5.610 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 0o, Amphipolis mint, c. 168 - 149 B.C.; obverse ivy-wreathed head of Dionysos right; reverse goat standing right, AMΦIΠO/ΛEITΩN in two lines, starting above, ending in exergue; scarce; $120.00 (€102.00)
 


Aigai, Aiolis, 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

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Aegae (or Aigai) means place of goats and was the name of many cities of antiquity. Aigai, Aiolis was also an important sanctuary of Apollo. It was within the Lydian Empire, then the Achaemenid Persian Empire, but had its brightest period under the Attalid dynasty, which ruled from nearby Pergamon in the 3rd and 2nd centuries B.C. It changed hands from Pergamon to the Seleucid Empire, but was recaptured by Attalus I of Pergamon in 218 B.C. In the war between Bithynia and Pergamon, it was destroyed by Prusias II of Bithynia in 156 B.C. After a peace was brokered by the Romans, the city was compensated with 100 talents. In 129 B.C., the Kingdom of Pergamon became part of the Roman Empire. Aigai was destroyed by an earthquake in 17 A.D. and received aid for reconstruction from Tiberius. The ruins are near the village of Yuntdagi Koseler in Manisa Province, Turkey.
GB85812. Bronze AE 16, Gorny & Mosch auction 160, lot 1477 (otherwise apparently unpublished); SNG Cop 14 var. (monograms); SNGvA -; SNG München -, BMC Troas -; Lindgren -, aVF, marks and scratches, encrustations, light corrosion, edge crack, weight 2.205 g, maximum diameter 15.8 mm, die axis 315o, Aiolis, Aigai (near Yuntdagi Koseler, Turkey) mint, 2nd - 1st Century B.C.; obverse draped bust of Hermes right, wearing petasos; reverse AIΓAEΩN, forepart of goat standing right, monograms (controls) above and right; ex Moneta Numismatic Services; extremely rare; $80.00 (€68.00)
 


Aigai, Aiolis, 3rd Century B.C.

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Aegae (or Aigai) means place of goats and was the name of many cities of antiquity. Aigai, Aiolis was also an important sanctuary of Apollo. It was within the Lydian Empire, then the Achaemenid Persian Empire, but had its brightest period under the Attalid dynasty, which ruled from nearby Pergamon in the 3rd and 2nd centuries B.C. It changed hands from Pergamon to the Seleucid Empire, but was recaptured by Attalus I of Pergamon in 218 B.C. In the war between Bithynia and Pergamon, it was destroyed by Prusias II of Bithynia in 156 B.C. After a peace was brokered by the Romans, the city was compensated with 100 talents. In 129 B.C., the Kingdom of Pergamon became part of the Roman Empire. Aigai was destroyed by an earthquake in 17 A.D. and received aid for reconstruction from Tiberius. The ruins are near the village of Yuntdagi Koseler in Manisa Province, Turkey.
GB90741. Bronze AE 9, SNG Cop 3, SNGvA 1593 var. (no legend), BMC Troas -, SNG München -, VF, green patina, weight 0.880 g, maximum diameter 9.3 mm, die axis 135o, Aiolis, Aigai (near Yuntdagi Koseler, Turkey) mint, 3rd century B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse head and neck of goat right, AIΓA upward behind; $32.00 (€27.20)
 


Aigai, Aiolis, 3rd Century B.C.

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Aegae (or Aigai) means place of goats and was the name of many cities of antiquity. Aigai, Aiolis was also an important sanctuary of Apollo. It was within the Lydian Empire, then the Achaemenid Persian Empire, but had its brightest period under the Attalid dynasty, which ruled from nearby Pergamon in the 3rd and 2nd centuries B.C. It changed hands from Pergamon to the Seleucid Empire, but was recaptured by Attalus I of Pergamon in 218 B.C. In the war between Bithynia and Pergamon, it was destroyed by Prusias II of Bithynia in 156 B.C. After a peace was brokered by the Romans, the city was compensated with 100 talents. In 129 B.C., the Kingdom of Pergamon became part of the Roman Empire. Aigai was destroyed by an earthquake in 17 A.D. and received aid for reconstruction from Tiberius. The ruins are near the village of Yuntdagi Koseler in Manisa Province, Turkey.
GB86112. Bronze AE 9, SNG Cop 2; SNGvA 1593 var. (no legend), BMC Troas -, SNG München -, VF, dark green patina with highlighting earthen deposits, scratches, weight 1.220 g, maximum diameter 9.1 mm, die axis 0o, Aiolis, Aigai (near Yuntdagi Koseler, Turkey) mint, 3rd century B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse head and neck of goat right, AIΓAE upward behind; $32.00 (€27.20)
 







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Goats