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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Coins Under $50||View Options:  |  |  |   

Coins and Antiquities Under $50

Coins are listed from highest |price| to lowest. If you are a serious bargain hunter, click the last page first and move backwards to the first page.

Selge, Pisidia, c. 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

|Pisidia|, |Selge,| |Pisidia,| |c.| |2nd| |-| |1st| |Century| |B.C.||chalkous|NEW
Selge, Pisidia on the southern slope of Mount Taurus where the river Eurymedon (Köprücay) forces its way through the mountains, was once the most powerful and populous city of Pisidia. Protected by precipices, torrents, and an army of 20,000 regarded as worthy kinsmen of the Spartans, Selge was never subject to a foreign power until Rome. In the 5th century A.D., Zosimus calls it a little town, but it was still strong enough to repel a body of Goths. The remains of the city consist mainly of parts of the encircling wall and of the acropolis. A few traces have survived of the gymnasium, the stoa, the stadium and the basilica. There are also the outlines of two temples, but the best-conserved monument is the theater, restored in the 3rd century A.D.
GB86923. Bronze chalkous, SNG BnF 1979; SNG Cop 263; SNGvA 5288; SNG PfPs 368; BMC Pisidia p. 262, 47; SGCV II 5491, F, mottled patina, tight flan (as usual for the type), weight 2.738 g, maximum diameter 13.7 mm, die axis 0o, Selge (southern slope of Mount Taurus, Turkey) mint, c. 2nd - 1st century B.C.; obverse bearded head of Herakles right, club over left shoulder; reverse winged thunderbolt, arc (bow?) on right, top end of arc ornamented with a stag head, Σ−E−Λ divided low across field; $50.00 SALE |PRICE| $45.00
 


Kingdom of Persis, Nambed (Namopat), 1st Century A.D.

|Kingdom| |of| |Persis|, |Kingdom| |of| |Persis,| |Nambed| |(Namopat),| |1st| |Century| |A.D.||hemidrachm|
Persis was located in what is now southern Iran. "Persians" settled the area as early as the 8th century B.C. From the time after its conquest by Alexander the Great, Persis was most often quasi-independent, under the hegemony of a Seleukid or Parthian king. Immediately following Alexander's death, Persis was subject to the Seleucid Kingdom. About 290 B.C., Persis regained independence. The coins produced during this period were Greek-inspired, but inscriptions were Aramaic, symbolic of Persis' rejection of the Greek ruling class. Sometime between c. 250 and 223 B.C., the Seleucids regained control. Mithradates II later incorporated Persis as a sub-kingdom of Parthia. Under Parthian domination, the coins and appearance of the kings depicted on them assumed the Parthian style. The last King of Persis, Artaxerxes, defeated the Parthians and founded the Sassanian Empire.
GS89568. Silver hemidrachm, cf. Alram IP 601; Sunrise 625; BMC Arabia p. 226, 6; Tyler-Smith -, VF, toned, a little rough, weight 1.119 g, maximum diameter 15.2 mm, die axis 180o, Persepolis (Fars Province, Iran) mint, 1st century A.D.; obverse bearded bust left, wearing Persepolitan crown with stepped battlements, diadem, torque and robe; reverse king standing right, holding scepter, before him, star and crescent with horns left, blundered inscription around; ex Ancient Imports (Marc Breitsprecher); $50.00 SALE |PRICE| $45.00
 


Gallienus, August 253 - September 268 A.D.

|Gallienus|, |Gallienus,| |August| |253| |-| |September| |268| |A.D.||sestertius|
Virtus is the personification of valor and courage. Valor was, of course, essential for the success of a Roman emperor and Virtus was one of the embodiments of virtues that were part of the Imperial cult. During his joint reign with his father, Gallienus proved his courage in battle; but his failure to liberate his father from Persian captivity was perceived as cowardice and a disgrace to the Emperor and Empire. It was not, however, actually fear that prevented a rescue. While others mourned Valerian's fate, Gallienus rejoiced in his new sovereignty.
RB91611. Orichalcum sestertius, Göbl MIR 38cc, RIC V-1 J248, Cohen V 1295, Hunter IV J33, SRCV III 10495, F/aF, well centered, tight squared flan (typical for the period), scratches and scrapes, weight 19.394 g, maximum diameter 28.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 253 - 255 A.D.; obverse IMP C P LIC GALLIENVS AVG, laureate and cuirassed bust right; reverse VIRTVS AVGG (valor of the two emperors), Virtus standing left, wearing crested helmet and military garb, right resting hand on grounded shield, spear vertical behind in left, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; $50.00 SALE |PRICE| $45.00
 


Severus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D., Thyatira, Lydia

|Thyatira|, |Severus| |Alexander,| |13| |March| |222| |-| |March| |235| |A.D.,| |Thyatira,| |Lydia||AE| |24|
Thyateira (also Thyatira) is the ancient name of the modern Turkish city of Akhisar ("white castle"). It lies in the far west of Turkey, south of Istanbul and almost due east of Athens. It is about 50 miles (80 km) from the Aegean Sea.
RP92867. Bronze AE 24, BMC Lydia p. 316, 128; RPC VI online T4384; SNG Munchen 675; SNG Cop 624; SNGvA -, F, green patina, earthen encrustations, porous, weight 6.605 g, maximum diameter 24.2 mm, die axis 180o, Thyatira (Akhisar, Turkey) mint, 13 Mar 222 - Mar 235 A.D.; obverse AYT K CE - AΛEΞAN∆POC, laureate head right; reverse ΘYATEIPH,NΩN (last three letters in exergue), she wolf right suckling twins Romulus and Remus; rare; $50.00 SALE |PRICE| $45.00
 


Gallienus, August 253 - September 268 A.D.

|Gallienus|, |Gallienus,| |August| |253| |-| |September| |268| |A.D.||antoninianus|
RIC lists this type as common, but Göbl lists only a single specimen, and Coin archives lists only one from the first officina and none from the second.
RA93318. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-1 S494, Cohen V 685, SRCV III 10295, Hunter IV 167 var. (1st officina), aVF, well centered, dark patina, weight 2.540 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Mediolanum (Milan, Italy) mint, 266 A.D.; obverse GALLIENVS AVG, radiate head right, drapery on left shoulder; reverse ORIENS AVG (the rising sun of the Emperor), Sol standing half left, radiate, nude but for chlamys over shoulders and left arm, raising right hand commanding the sun to rise, whip in left, S in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $50.00 SALE |PRICE| $45.00
 


Magnesia ad Maeandrum, Ionia, c. 145 - 100 B.C.

|Magnesia| |ad| |Meandrum|, |Magnesia| |ad| |Maeandrum,| |Ionia,| |c.| |145| |-| |100| |B.C.||AE| |21|
Magnesia ad Maeandrum was an inland city of Ionia, located on a small tributary of the Maeander River about 12 miles southeast of Ephesus. "..the temple of Artemis Leukophryene, which in the size of its shrine and in the number of its votive offerings is inferior to the temple at Ephesos, but in the harmony and skill shown in the structure of the sacred enclosure is far superior to it. And in size it surpasses all the sacred enclosures in Asia except two, that at Ephesos (to Artemis) and that at Didymoi (to Apollo)" -- Strabo, Geography 14. 1. 40.
GB93594. Bronze AE 21, SNG Kayhan 431, SNG Cop 850, SNGvA 2043, BMC Ionia p. 163, 44, F, earthen deposits, parts of reverse inscriptions off flan, weight 8.780 g, maximum diameter 20.6 mm, die axis 0o, Magnesia ad Maeandrum (near Tekin, Turkey) mint, c. 145 - 100 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, wearing crested Attic helmet; reverse cavalryman galloping right, wearing crested helmet, cuirass and chlamys, holding couched spear, MAΓN-HTΩN above, N left, EYKΛHΣ / KPATINOΣ (Eukles [son of] Kratinos) in two lines below; $50.00 SALE |PRICE| $45.00
 


Gallienus, August 253 - September 268 A.D.

|Gallienus|, |Gallienus,| |August| |253| |-| |September| |268| |A.D.||antoninianus|
Security was only wishful thinking when this coin was struck. There were so many invasions in the next few years that they confused the ancient sources and much of the history is lost. In 267, the Goths sacked several cities in southern Greece including Athens, Corinth, Argos and Sparta. Gallienus defeated them, but the Alamanni would come the year after.
RA94176. Billon antoninianus, Göbl MIR 595a, RSC IV 961a, RIC V-1 S280, SRCV III 10359, Hunter IV S77, VF, encrustations, tight ragged flan, parts of legends weak/off flan, weight 2.619 g, maximum diameter 20.1 mm, die axis 180o, 8th officina, Rome mint, 264 - 267 A.D.; obverse GALLIENVS AVG, radiate head right; reverse SECVRIT PERPET (everlasting security), Securitas standing slightly left, legs crossed, head left, long scepter in right hand, leaning with left arm on column, H right; ; $50.00 SALE |PRICE| $45.00
 


Gallienus, August 253 - September 268 A.D.

|Gallienus|, |Gallienus,| |August| |253| |-| |September| |268| |A.D.||antoninianus|
The infant Jupiter was suckled by the goat Amaltheia on Mount Ida.
RA94179. Billon antoninianus, Göbl MIR 730b, RSC IV 342, RIC V-1 S207, Hunter IV S110, SRCV III 10235, gF, near full legends, ragged oval flan, die wear/cracks, edge cracks, weight 3.032 g, maximum diameter 21.9 mm, die axis 0o, 6th officina, Rome mint, 267 - Sep 268 A.D.; obverse GALLIENVS AVG, radiate head right; reverse IOVI CONS AVG (to Jove protector of the emperor), goat Amaltheia left, S in exergue; $50.00 SALE |PRICE| $45.00
 


Gallienus, August 253 - September 268 A.D.

|Gallienus|, |Gallienus,| |August| |253| |-| |September| |268| |A.D.||antoninianus|
The "zoo series" of coins calling on Diana to protect the Emperor was struck late in Gallienus' reign. His father, Valerian, had been particularly dedicated to the worship of Diana the Preserver and had dedicated a temple to her at Rome. Diana apparently did not favor Gallienus. Not long after this coin was struck, he was assassinated near Milan while attempting to deal with the usurper Aureolus.
RA94199. Billon antoninianus, Göbl MIR 747b, RIC V-1 S181, RIC IV 162, SRCV III 10200, VF, nice portrait, tight flan cutting off part of legends, tiny edge splits, weight 2.964 g, maximum diameter 19.7 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 267 - Sep 268 A.D.; obverse GALLIENVS AVG, radiate bust right; reverse DIANAE CONS AVG (to Diana protector of the Emperor), antelope standing right, XI in exergue; $50.00 SALE |PRICE| $45.00
 


Gallienus, August 253 - September 268 A.D.

|Gallienus|, |Gallienus,| |August| |253| |-| |September| |268| |A.D.||antoninianus|
Mars, the male god of war, is usually shown nude and Virtus, the female personification of courage and valor, is always shown clothed. This figure, however, appears to be male and thus, Mars, or perhaps the emperor.
RA94207. Billon antoninianus, Göbl MIR 344a, RIC V-1 S317, RSC IV 1221c, SRCV III 10401, Hunter IV S32 var. (right foot on helmet), gVF, porosity, beginning of obverse legend weak, reverse off center, weight 3.414 g, maximum diameter 21.3 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Rome mint, 260- 261 A.D.; obverse GALLIENVS AVG, radiate head right; reverse VIRTVS AVG (the valor of the Emperor), Mars standing slightly left, head left, wearing crested helmet and military garb, globe in right hand, inverted spear in left hand, P (1st officina) right; scarce; $50.00 SALE |PRICE| $45.00
 




  



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