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Galerius, 1 March 305 - 5 May 311 A.D.

|Galerius|, |Galerius,| |1| |March| |305| |-| |5| |May| |311| |A.D.|,
In Roman religion, every man has a genius, a presiding spirit. In De Die Natali, Censorinus says, from the moment we are born, we live under the guard and tutelage of Genius. Cities, organizations, and peoples also had a genius. On coins, we find inscriptions to the Genius of the Army, of the Senate, of the Roman People, etc. The legend GENIO IMPERATORIS dedicates this coin to the Genius of the Imperators. Genius' image is of a man with a cloak half covering the shoulders leaving the rest of his body naked, holding a cornucopia in one hand, and a simpulum or a patera in the other.
RX93188. Billon follis, Hunter V 80 (also 4th officina), RIC VI Alexandria 105a, SRCV IV 14524, Cohen VII 48, aVF, well centered, light deposits, some legend weak from uneven strike, light marks, areas of porosity, weight 7.609 g, maximum diameter 25.5 mm, die axis 180o, 4th officina, Alexandria mint, c. 308 - 310 A.D.; obverse IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, laureate head right; reverse GENIO IMPERATORIS (to the guardian spirit of the Emperor as Commander in Chief), Genio standing slightly left, head left, nude but for chlamys over shoulders and left arm, patera in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, K - ∆/P at sides, ALE in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $90.00 SALE |PRICE| $81.00


Athens, Attica, Greece, c. 454 - 404 B.C., Old Style Tetradrachm

|Athens|, |Athens,| |Attica,| |Greece,| |c.| |454| |-| |404| |B.C.,| |Old| |Style| |Tetradrachm|,
The old-style tetradrachm of Athens is famous for its almond shaped eye, archaic smile, and charming owl reverse. Around 480 B.C. a wreath of olive leaves and a decorative scroll were added to Athena's helmet. On the reverse, a crescent moon was added.

During the period 449 - 413 B.C. huge quantities of tetradrachms were minted to finance grandiose building projects such as the Parthenon and to cover the costs of the Peloponnesian War.
GS95125. Silver tetradrachm, SNG Cop 31, SNG Munchen 49, Kroll 8, Dewing 1611, Gulbenkian 519, HGC 4 1597, SGCV I 2526, gVF, usual high relief, flow lines, typical tight flan, small edge cracks, weight 17.209 g, maximum diameter 24.3 mm, die axis 270o, Athens mint, c. 454 - 404 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, almond shaped eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and floral scroll, wire necklace, round earring, hair in parallel curves; reverse owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, olive sprig and crescent left, AΘE downward on right, all within incuse square; $850.00 SALE |PRICE| $765.00


Athens, Attica, Greece, c. 454 - 404 B.C., Old Style Tetradrachm

|Athens|, |Athens,| |Attica,| |Greece,| |c.| |454| |-| |404| |B.C.,| |Old| |Style| |Tetradrachm|,
The old-style tetradrachm of Athens is famous for its almond shaped eye, archaic smile, and charming owl reverse. Around 480 B.C. a wreath of olive leaves and a decorative scroll were added to Athena's helmet. On the reverse, a crescent moon was added.

During the period 449 - 413 B.C. huge quantities of tetradrachms were minted to finance grandiose building projects such as the Parthenon and to cover the costs of the Peloponnesian War.
GS95126. Silver tetradrachm, SNG Cop 31, SNG Munchen 49, Kroll 8, Dewing 1611, Gulbenkian 519, HGC 4 1597, SGCV I 2526, aEF, much mint luster, usual high relief, flow lines, typical tight flan, some obverse die wear, weight 17.199 g, maximum diameter 23.9 mm, die axis 135o, Athens mint, c. 454 - 404 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, almond shaped eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and floral scroll, wire necklace, round earring, hair in parallel curves; reverse owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, olive sprig and crescent left, AΘE downward on right, all within incuse square; $850.00 SALE |PRICE| $765.00


Syracuse, Sicily, Timoleon and the Third Democracy, c. 344 - 317 B.C.

|Syracuse|, |Syracuse,| |Sicily,| |Timoleon| |and| |the| |Third| |Democracy,| |c.| |344| |-| |317| |B.C.|,
Threatened by Carthage and dominated by Hiketas, the tyrant of Leontini, Syracusans sent an appeal for help to their mother city, Corinth. By a unanimous vote Corinth selected Timoleon to set sail for Sicily with a few leading citizens of Corinth and a small troop of Greek mercenaries. After defeating Hiketas, Timoleon put order to Syracuse' affairs and established a democratic government. He repelled Carthage in several wars, ending with a treaty which divided the island. Timoleon then retired without any title or office, though he remained practically supreme. He became blind before his death, but when important issues were under discussion he was carried to the assembly to give his opinion, which was usually accepted. When he died the citizens of Syracuse erected a monument to his memory, afterward surrounded with porticoes, and a gymnasium called Timoleonteum.
GI95238. Silver dilitron, SNG ANS 518; SNG Cop 717; SNG Munchen 1126; BMC Sicily p. 186, 283; Weber 1644; HGC 2 1373 (R2), VF, well centered, very dark toning, porosity, edge crack, weight 1.226 g, maximum diameter 14.3 mm, die axis 45o, Syracuse mint, c. 344 - 317 B.C.; obverse laureate Janiform female head, ΣYPAKOΣI-ΩN upward on left, two dolphins nose to nose on right; reverse horse galloping right, barley ear right above, N below; ex Forum (2018); rare; $450.00 SALE |PRICE| $405.00


Sinope, Paphlagonia, c. 330 - 300 B.C.

|Paphlagonia|, |Sinope,| |Paphlagonia,| |c.| |330| |-| |300| |B.C.|,
Long used as a Hittite port, Sinope was re-founded as a Greek colony by Miletus in the 7th century B.C. Sinope flourished as the Black Sea port of a caravan route that led from the upper Euphrates valley. The city escaped Persian domination until the early 4th century B.C. In 183 B.C. it was captured by Pharnaces I and became the capital of the kingdom of Pontus. Lucullus conquered Sinope for Rome in 70 B.C., and Julius Caesar established a Roman colony there, Colonia Julia Felix, in 47 B.C. It remained with the Eastern Roman Empire (Byzantines). It was a part of the Empire of Trebizond from the sacking of Constantinople by the Fourth Crusade in 1204 until the capture of the city by the Seljuk Turks of Rm in 1214.
SH95239. Silver drachm, SNG BM 1481, SNG Cop 277, Rec Gen 25, HGC 7 399, SNGvA 6847, gVF, attractive style, toned, well centered, tight flan as usual for the type, some light scratches, weight 5.969 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 15o, Sinope (Sinop, Turkey) mint, magistrate Agreos, c. 330 - 300 B.C.; obverse head of nymph Sinope left, hair in sakkos, wearing triple pendant earring and necklace, apluster before her; reverse eagle flying right with dolphin right in talons, AΓPEΩΣ (magistrate's name) below wing, ΣINΩ below dolphin; ex Forum (2015); $680.00 SALE |PRICE| $612.00


Metapontion, Lucania, Italy, c. 330 - 290 B.C.

|Italy|, |Metapontion,| |Lucania,| |Italy,| |c.| |330| |-| |290| |B.C.|,
Demeter in Greek mythology is the goddess of grain and fertility, the pure; nourisher of the youth and the green earth, the health-giving cycle of life and death; and preserver of marriage and the sacred law. In the Homeric Hymn to Demeter, dated to about the seventh century B.C. she is invoked as the "bringer of seasons," a subtle sign that she was worshiped long before she was made one of the Olympians. She and her daughter Persephone were the central figures of the Eleusinian Mysteries that also predated the Olympian pantheon.
SH95240. Silver nomos, Johnston C6; BMC Italy p. 252, 108; SNG ANS 489; SNG Munchen 977; SNG Lockett 421; SNG Fitzwilliam 509; SNG Oxford 760; HN Italy 1589, VF, attractive style, struck with high relief dies, light toning, tight flan, weight 7.524 g, maximum diameter 19.9 mm, die axis 270o, Metapontion (Metaponto, Italy) mint, c. 330 - 290 B.C.; obverse head of Demeter left, wreathed in grain; reverse barley ear with seven rows of grains, leaf on left, griffin springing right above leaf, ΛY below leaf, META on right; ex Forum (2013); $800.00 SALE |PRICE| $720.00


Neapolis, Campania, Italy, c. 275 - 250 B.C.

|Italy|, |Neapolis,| |Campania,| |Italy,| |c.| |275| |-| |250| |B.C.|,
In angst at not seducing Ulysses with her voice, the siren Parthenope, threw herself into the sea and died. Her body washed up on the shore near Neapolis. There she was not envisioned as one of the insidious monsters of Homer, but rather like a dead hero, she was enshrined and deified and her name was given to an early settlement on the site. Neapolis held funerary torch-races to commemorate Parthenope and her nearby tomb and sanctuary were among the local places of interest. The river god Achelous was her father.
SH95243. Silver nomos, SNG Cop 440; SNG ANS 381; BMC Italy 100, 63; Sambon 483; HN Italy 586; SNG Cop -, Choice VF, fine style, toned, well centered on a tight flan, porous, light marks, weight 7.114 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 45o, Neapolis (Naples, Italy) mint, c. 275 - 250 B.C.; obverse head of siren Parthenope left, wearing taenia, triple-pendant earring, and necklace, EY behind neck; reverse the river-god Achelous in the form of a man-faced bull, walking left, head turned facing, Nike flying left above, placing wreath on river-god's head, ΛOY below, NEOΠOΛITHΣ in exergue; ex Forum (2018); $700.00 SALE |PRICE| $630.00


Histiaia, North Euboea, Greece, c. 267 - 146 B.C.

|Euboia|, |Histiaia,| |North| |Euboea,| |Greece,| |c.| |267| |-| |146| |B.C.|,
Histiaia, named after its patron nymph, commanded a strategic position overlooking the narrows leading to the North Euboian Gulf. In the Iliad, Homer describes the surrounding plain as "rich in vines." It was pro-Macedonian during the 3rd century, for which it was attacked in 208 and captured in 199 by a Roman-Pergamene force. The Roman garrison was removed in 194. It appears Histiaia continued to prosper but little is known of its later history. Finds at the site indicate it continued to be inhabited in Roman, Byzantine, and later times.
GS95244. Silver tetrobol, cf. BCD Euboia 377 ff.; SNG Cop 517 ff.; BMC Central p. 128, 34 ff.; SGCV I 2498, VF, nice style, toned, tight flan, bumps and marks, weight 2.055 g, maximum diameter 14.6 mm, die axis 90o, Histiaea mint, c. 267 - 146 B.C.; obverse head of nymph Histiaia right, wreathed in vine, hair rolled, wearing earring and necklace; reverse IΣTI−AIEΩN (counterclockwise, starting below), nymph Histiaia seated right on stern of a galley, naval standard in left hand, ornate apluster; ex Forum (2018); $140.00 (126.00)


Ephesos, Ionia, c. 202 - 189 B.C.

|Ephesos|, |Ephesos,| |Ionia,| |c.| |202| |-| |189| |B.C.|,
Coins with these obverse and reverse types were struck by numerous magistrates, c. 202 - 133 B.C. Kinns identified two different issues by magistrates named Mitras. This type with the rectangular wings was struck by the earlier Mitras and, according to Kinns, an example of this earlier type was found in a hoard (CH II.81, Syria, 1971) believed to have been deposited in 189 B.C.
GS95246. Silver drachm, struck on the Attic standard; Kinns Ephesus p. 88; Head Ephesus p. 58; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -; SNG Kayhan -; SNG Mn -; SNG Tb -; BMC Ionia -, gVF, well centered, toned, die wear, bumps and scratches, weight 3.827 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 0o, Ephesos mint, magistrate Metras (I), c. 202 - 189 B.C.; obverse bee seen from above, straight rectangular wings, E-Φ flanking above wings; reverse stag standing right on exergual line, palm tree in background center on far side of stag, MHTPAΣ (magistrate) downward on right; ex Forum (2017), ex David Cannon Collection, ex Beast Coins; rare; $440.00 SALE |PRICE| $396.00


Macedonia Prima Merida (First Region), Roman Dependent Republic, c. 168 - 149 B.C.

|Roman| |Macedonia|, |Macedonia| |Prima| |Merida| |(First| |Region),| |Roman| |Dependent| |Republic,| |c.| |168| |-| |149| |B.C.|,
This type was minted with Artemis' age ranging from childhood to maturity. "Artemis is presented as ageless in the sense that she is every age. These coins were all struck at the same time and the same place as hoard evidence verifies." -- Wayne Sayles, "Ancient Coin Collecting III, Numismatic Art of the Greek World"
SH95247. Silver tetradrachm, SNG Cop 1310 - 1311; SNG Ashmolean 3290; BMC Macedonia p. 7, 2, aVF, toned, porous, light marks, small open flan crack, weight 14.637 g, maximum diameter 31.8 mm, die axis 270o, Amphipolis mint, c. 168 - 149 B.C.; obverse Macedonian shield (the whole obverse represents a shield) with bust of Artemis Tauropolos (Diana to the Romans) at the center facing right, bow and quiver at her shoulder; reverse MAKE∆ONΩN / ΠPΩTHΣ (First Macedonia Province) in two lines above and below club, AP monogram above, all within oak wreath, thunderbolt left; ex Forum (2014); $280.00 SALE |PRICE| $252.00




  







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