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Medieval & Modern Coins
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Judaea (Yehudah), Ptolemaic Rule, Ptolemy II Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C.

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Ptolemy II encouraged education, commerce, industry, immigration and trade resulting in a prosperous growing economy and making him the richest monarch of his age. His 112 ships comprised the most powerful fleet that had ever existed. His splendid court compares with the Versailles of Louis XIV. An enthusiast for Hellenic culture, he also adopted Egyptian religious concepts bolstering his image as a pharaoh. At the Library at Alexandria, Jewish texts were translated and transcribed by seventy Jewish scholars, creating the Septuagint, the oldest Greek version of the Hebrew Bible. He defeated the Seleucids in the first Syrian War, gaining control of western Cilicia, southern Lycia, Caunus, Halicarnassus, Myndus, Cnidus, probably Miletus, all of Phoenicia, and even part of Syria.
GS94060. Silver quarter ma'ah, Hendin 1081; Meshorer TJC 33; Mildenberg Yehud pl. 22, 26; Gitler-Lorber II, group 6, pl. 1, 10, aF, obverse off flan, weight 0.162 g, maximum diameter 5.7 mm, c. 283 - 270 B.C.; obverse diademed bust of either Ptolemy I right; reverse head of Berenike I right, Hebrew inscription downward on right: YHD; very rare; $720.00 (648.00)


Great Britain, Robert Reynolds & Co., Copper Halfpenny Token, 1792

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UK94091. Copper token, Dalton-Hamer 233, EF, evenly toned surfaces with a hint of red, light marks; Inscription on edge: PAYABLE AT THE WAREHOUSE OF ROBERT REYNOLDS & CO., weight 11.607 g, maximum diameter 31.1 mm, die axis 180o, 1792; obverse PRO BONO PUBLICO, Lady Godiva aside horse left (from the flag of the city of Coventry), 1792 in exergue; reverse COVENTRY HALFPENNY., castle on the back of an elephant (from the arms of the city of Coventry); ; rare; $180.00 (162.00)


Great Britain, William IV, 26 June 1830 - 20 June 1837

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William IV was the third son of George III and younger brother and successor to George IV, he was the last king and penultimate monarch of Britain's House of Hanover. He was nicknamed the "Sailor King" because he served in the Royal Navy in his youth. He served in North America and the Caribbean. Since his two older brothers died without leaving legitimate issue, he inherited the throne at 64 years old. His reign saw reforms: the poor law was updated, child labor restricted, slavery abolished in nearly all the Empire, and the electoral system was reformed. Although William did not engage in politics as much as his brother or his father, he was the last monarch to appoint a prime minister contrary to the will of Parliament. He granted his German kingdom a short-lived liberal constitution. At the time of his death, William had no surviving legitimate children, but he was survived by eight of the ten illegitimate children he had by the actress Dorothea Jordan, with whom he cohabited for twenty years. William was succeeded in the United Kingdom by his niece, Victoria, and in Hanover by his brother, Ernest Augustus.
UK94098. Bronze penny, SCBC 3845, Krause KM 707, Choice EF+, toned with some subdued mint red, weight 19.000 g, maximum diameter 34.0 mm, London mint, 1831; obverse GULIELMUS IIII DEI GRATIA (William, by the Grace of God), bare head right, 1831 below, no initials on neck truncation; reverse BRITANNIAR: REX FID: DEF: (King of the Britains, Defender of the Faith), Britannia seated right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet, resting right hand on shield at side ornamented with the Union Jack, trident in left hand; rose, shamrock, and thistle in exergue; ex D. B. Bailey Collection; rare in this quality; $310.00 (279.00)


Great Britain, George IV, 29 January 1820 - 26 June 1830

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From 1811 until his accession, George IV served as regent during his father's mental illness. He forbade his wife from attending his coronation and unsuccessfully attempted to divorce her, which brought the contempt of the people. For most of George's regency and reign, Prime Minister Lord Liverpool controlled the government with little help from George. George's extravagant lifestyle and wasteful spending angered taxpayers at a time when Britain was fighting the Napoleonic Wars. He did not provide leadership in a time of crisis, nor did he act as a role model for his people. Liverpool led Britain's ultimate victory, negotiated the peace settlement, and attempted to deal with the social and economic malaise that followed. George IV was succeeded by his younger brother William.
UK94099. Silver half crown, SCBC 3808, Krause KM 688, EF, reeded edge, weight 14.102 g, maximum diameter 32.1 mm, die axis 0o, Tower mint, 1823; obverse GEORGIUS IIII D:G: BRITANNIAR: REX F: D (George IV, by the grace of God, King of the British territories, Defender of the Faith), laureate head left, tiny B.P. (engraver Benedetto Pistrucci) below; reverse Crowned shield of arms within garter bearing French motto, "HONI SOIT QUI MAL Y PENSE" (May he be shamed who thinks badly of it); shield quartered, with harp and lions, crowned Arms of Hanover escutcheon in center; ANNO - 1823 below divided by St. George slaying dragon; ex D. B. Bailey Collection; $320.00 (288.00)


Aspendos, Pamphylia, c. 465 - 420 B.C.

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In 467 B.C. the Athenian statesman and military commander Cimon, and his fleet of 200 ships, destroyed the Persian navy based at the mouth of the river Eurymedon in a surprise attack. In order to crush to Persian land forces, he tricked the Persians by sending his best fighters ashore wearing the garments of the hostages he had seized earlier. When they saw these men, the Persians thought that they were compatriots freed by the enemy and arranged festivities in celebration. Taking advantage of this, Cimon landed and annihilated the Persians. Aspendos then became a member of the Attic-Delos Maritime league.
GS94449. Silver stater, SNG BnF 6; cf. SNGvA 4482 (ethnic arrangement), BMC Lycia -, SNG Cop -, SNG PfPs -, VF, struck with worn dies, oval generally favoring types, weight 10.739 g, maximum diameter 21.7 mm, die axis 90o, Aspendos mint, c. 465 - 420 B.C.; obverse warrior advancing right, nude, wearing crested helmet, couched spear in right hand, round shield on left arm; reverse triskeles of human legs counterclockwise, EΣ−Π counterclockwise staring lower left, all within an incuse square; $135.00 (121.50)


Aspendos, Pamphylia, c. 465 - 420 B.C.

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In 467 B.C. the Athenian statesman and military commander Cimon, and his fleet of 200 ships, destroyed the Persian navy based at the mouth of the river Eurymedon in a surprise attack. In order to crush to Persian land forces, he tricked the Persians by sending his best fighters ashore wearing the garments of the hostages he had seized earlier. When they saw these men, the Persians thought that they were compatriots freed by the enemy and arranged festivities in celebration. Taking advantage of this, Cimon landed and annihilated the Persians. Aspendos then became a member of the Attic-Delos Maritime league.
GS94458. Silver stater, SNG BnF 6; cf. SNGvA 4482 (ethnic arrangement), BMC Lycia -, SNG Cop -, SNG PfPs -, VF, struck with worn obverse die, reverse off center, weight 10.722 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 180o, Aspendos mint, c. 465 - 420 B.C.; obverse warrior advancing right, nude, wearing crested helmet, couched spear in right hand, round shield on left arm; reverse triskeles of human legs counterclockwise, EΣ−Π counterclockwise staring lower left, all within an incuse square; scarce variant; $115.00 (103.50)


Athens, Attica, Greece, c. 454 - 404 B.C., Old Style Tetradrachm

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The old-style tetradrachm of Athens is famous for its almond shaped eye, archaic smile, and charming owl reverse. Around 480 B.C. a wreath of olive leaves and a decorative scroll were added to Athena's helmet. On the reverse, a crescent moon was added.

During the period 449 - 413 B.C. huge quantities of tetradrachms were minted to finance grandiose building projects such as the Parthenon and to cover the costs of the Peloponnesian War.
GS94307. Silver tetradrachm, SNG Cop 31, SNG Mnchen 49, Kroll 8, Dewing 1611, Gulbenkian 519, HGC 4 1597, SGCV I 2526, F, high relief, centered on a tight flan, uneven tone, rough, test cut, edge split, weight 16.968 g, maximum diameter 24.4 mm, die axis 90o, Athens mint, c. 454 - 404 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, almond shaped eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and floral scroll, wire necklace, round earring, hair in parallel curves; reverse owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, olive sprig and crescent left, AΘE downward on right, all within incuse square; $260.00 (234.00)


Julian II "the Apostate," February 360 - 26 June 363 A.D.

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In 351, Constantius Gallus built a new church in honor of Saint Babylas at Daphne, a suburb of Antioch, and transferred the remains of the bishop to it to neutralize the pagan effects of the nearby temple of Apollo. In 362, Julian consulted the oracle of Apollo at the temple in Daphne, but received no answer, and was told that it was because of the proximity of the saint. He had the sarcophagus of the martyr exhumed and removed. A few days later, on October 22, a mysterious fire broke out consuming the roof of the temple and the statue of the god, copied from Phidias' statue of Zeus at Olympia. Julian, suspecting angry Christians, closed the cathedral of Antioch and ordered an investigation. Ammianus Marcellinus reports "a frivolous rumor" laid blame on candles lit by a worshipper late the previous night (XXII, 13). John Chrysostom claimed a bolt of lightning set the temple on fire. The remains of Babylas were reinterred in a church dedicated to him on the other side of the River Orontes.
RL93013. Billon double maiorina, RIC VIII Antioch 217 (R2), LRBC II 2641, SRCV V 19162, Cohen VIII 38, Voetter -, gVF, toned copper surfaces, porous and a little rough from light corrosion, weight 8.089 g, maximum diameter 26.3 mm, die axis 0o, 3rd officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, c. 362 - 26 Jun 363 A.D.; obverse D N FL CL IVLIANVS P F AVG, rosette-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse SECVRITAS REIPVB (security of the Republic), Bull standing right, two stars above, ANTΓ between two palm fronds in exergue; from the Jimi Berlin Caesarea Collection; rare; $95.00 (85.50)


Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy II Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C.

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Ptolemy II encouraged education, commerce, industry, immigration and trade resulting in a prosperous growing economy and making him the richest monarch of his age. His 112 ships comprised the most powerful fleet that had ever existed. His splendid court compares with the Versailles of Louis XIV. An enthusiast for Hellenic culture, he also adopted Egyptian religious concepts bolstering his image as a pharaoh. At the Library at Alexandria, Jewish texts were translated and transcribed by seventy Jewish scholars, creating the Septuagint, the oldest Greek version of the Hebrew Bible. He defeated the Seleucids in the first Syrian War, gaining control of western Cilicia, southern Lycia, Caunus, Halicarnassus, Myndus, Cnidus, probably Miletus, all of Phoenicia, and even part of Syria.
GP93009. Bronze diobol, Lorber CPE 174; Svoronos 576 (23 spec.); Weiser 10; Noeske 60; BMC Ptolemies p. 25, 15; SNG Milan 61; Weber 8248, Cox Curium 62; SNG Blackburn 1160, aVF, well centered, black patina, spots of corrosion, some patina chipping, weight 14.323 g, maximum diameter 28.6 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, c. 274 - 261 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ (King Ptolemy), eagle with open wings standing left on thunderbolt, ΣΩ monogram over shield in left field, o between eagle's legs; from Jimi Berlin; $90.00 (81.00)


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.

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Septimius Severus' wife, Julia Domna, was born in Emesa in 170 A.D. She was the youngest daughter of high-priest Julius Bassianus, a descendant of the Royal House of Emesa.
RS93011. Silver denarius, RIC IV 424 (S); BMCRE V p. 98, W395 and pl. 17, 4; RSC III 675a; Hunter III -; SRCV II -, VF, toned, slightly off center but full legends on a broad flan, flow lines, light marks, weight 3.546 g, maximum diameter 20.1 mm, die axis 180o, Emesa (Homs, Syria) mint, 194 A.D.; obverse IMP CAE L SEP SEV PERT AVG COS II, laureate head right; reverse VICT AVG (the victory of the Emperor), Victory walking left, wreath in right hand, palm frond in left hand; from the Jimi Berlin Collection (obtained by trade at Caesarea, Israel, 1972, find spot unknown); $95.00 (85.50)




  







Catalog current as of Wednesday, February 19, 2020.
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