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The Celator, Journal of Ancient and Medieval Coinage, Complete| - All Issues, Feb/Mar 1987 - May/June 2012

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For 25 years, The Celator was the world's premier journal for ancient coin collectors. It was founded in 1987 by Wayne G. Sayles who published it with the help of family members until 1999 when it was sold to Kerry K. Wetterstrom. Kerry published it for another 13 years. Vol. 1, was published every two months, it was issued monthly thereafter. It was printed in newspaper format from Vol. 1, No. 1 to Vol. 4, No. 8. Thereafter it was a glossy magazine.
BG20514. The Celator, Journal of Ancient and Medieval Coinage, **** COMPLETE| - ALL VOLUMES ****, from Vol. 1, No. 1 (February, 1987) to Vol. 26, No. 5 (May-June, 2012); the first two newsprint volumes a bit browned, nearly all other volumes pristine, most with mailing covers intact; price includes domestic shipping, international shipping at cost; $1200.00 (1056.00)


Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy VI Philometor, 180 - 145 B.C.

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Ptolemy VI became king in 180 B.C. at the age of about 6 and ruled jointly with his mother, Cleopatra I, until her death in 176 BC. From 170 to 164 B.C., Egypt was ruled by Ptolemy, his sister-queen and his younger brother Ptolemy VIII Physcon. In 170 BC, the Seleukid King Antiochus IV invaded and was even crowned king in 168, but abandoned his claim on the orders from Rome. In 164 Ptolemy VI was driven out by his brother. He went to Rome and received support from Cato, and was restored the following year. In 152 BC, he briefly ruled jointly with his son, Ptolemy Eupator, but his son probably died that same year. In 145 B.C. he died of battle wounds received against Alexander Balas of Syria. Ptolemy VI ruled uneasily, cruelly suppressing frequent rebellions.
GP89281. Bronze quarter obol, Svoronos 1408, Weiser -, SNG Cop -, Noeske -, Hosking -, SNG Milan -, Malter -, Tziambazis -, F, reverse legend unstruck (missing from dies?), obverse edge beveled, tiny edge split, weight 2.488 g, maximum diameter 16.2 mm, die axis 0o, Cyprus, uncertain mint, c. 176 - 170 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Ptolemy I right, wearing aegis; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, eagle with wings closed standing half left atop fulmen, lotus flower in left field; $150.00 (132.00)


Alexandreia Troas, Troas, 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

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Alexandria Troas (modern Eski Stambul) is on the Aegean Sea near the northern tip of the west coast of Anatolia, a little south of Tenedos (modern Bozcaada). The city was founded by Antigonus around 310 B.C. with the name Antigoneia and was populated with the inhabitants of Cebren, Colone, Hamaxitus, Neandria, and Scepsis. About 301 B.C., Lysimachus improved the city and re-named it Alexandreia. Among the few structure ruins remaining today are a bath, an odeon, a theater and gymnasium complex and a stadium. The circuit of the old walls can still be traced.
CM89991. Bronze AE 19, SNG Cop 96 (same countermarks); cf. BMC Troas p. 12, 29 ff.; SNG Mnchen 92 f.; SNGvA 1461, coin: obverse mostly obscured by countermarks, reverse flattened by countermarking; countermarks: mostly VF, weight 5.358 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, Alexandria Troas (Eski Stambul, Turkey) mint, 2nd - 1st Century B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo facing (only upper left side of face and left eye visible); c/m: 1) lyre in 7mm round punch, 2) female head right within 7mm round punch, 3) uncertain (mouse?); reverse lyre, AΛEΞAN (or similar) around, all within laurel wreath; c/m: horse head right; $120.00 (105.60)


Sinope, Paphlagonia, c. 120 - 100 B.C.

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Mithradates VI was king of Pontus c. 120 to 63 B.C. He was of both Greek and Persian origin, claiming descent from both Alexander the Great and King Darius I of Persia. Mithradates is remembered as one of Rome's most formidable and successful enemies, who engaged three of the most prominent generals of the late Roman Republic in the so-called Mithridatic Wars: Sulla, Lucullus, and Pompey the Great. After Mithradates VI was at last defeated by Pompey and in danger of capture by Rome, he attempted suicide. The poison failed because he had taken daily doses to build immunity. He then made his bodyguard and friend, Bituitus, kill him by the sword.
GB92064. Brass AE 29, SNG BM Black Sea 1523; SNG Stancomb 792; Rec Gn p. 206, 58 & tf. 26, 14; HGC 7 41, F, some earthen deposits, scratches, areas of slight porosity, weight 20.685 g, maximum diameter 28.6 mm, die axis 0o, Sinope (Sinop, Turkey) mint, c. 120 - 100 B.C.; obverse head right, wearing bashlyk (Persian-style pointed leather cap); reverse quiver with strap and unstrung bow, ΣINΩ-PHΣ divided across field; ex Gerhard Rohde; very rare; $150.00 (132.00)


Paphos, Cyprus, Timarchos, c. 350 - 332 B.C.

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Doves are a symbol of peace but also a romantic symbol of love. The dove relates to romance because Greek mythology associated the small, white bird with Aphrodite, the goddess of love. Aphrodite's jewel-encrusted, golden chariot was drawn through the sky by a team of doves.
GB92215. Bronze AE 16, Bank of Cyprus 20 (same countermark), Tziambazis 91, BMC Cyprus -, SNG Cop -, Lindgren -, Fair/Fine, dark green patina, porous, weight 2.707 g, maximum diameter 15.7 mm, die axis 45o, Paphos mint, c. 350 - 332 B.C.; obverse head of Aphrodite left, wearing stephane, single drop earring, and necklace; reverse dove standing right, star above; countermark: rose in a round punch; $40.00 (35.20)


Kyzikos, Mysia, c. 200 - 100 B.C.

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The torch is a symbol of Demeter. After Hades abducted Demeter's virgin daughter Persephone to be his wife, Demeter searched for her lighting her way through the earth with torches. While she searched, she was preoccupied with loss and grief. The seasons halted; living things ceased their growth, then began to die. Faced with the extinction of all life on earth, Zeus sent his messenger Hermes to the underworld to bring Persephone back. However, because she had eaten while in the underworld, Hades had a claim on her. Therefore, it was decreed that she would spend four months each year in the underworld. During these months Demeter grieves for her daughter's absence, withdrawing her gifts from the world, creating winter. Persephone's return brings the spring.
GB92132. Bronze AE 22, SNG BnF 490 var.; SNG Cop 82 var.; SNG Tbingen 2265 var.; SNGvA 1241 var.; BMC Mysia p. 39, 161 (none with this control monogram), VF, green patina, scattered porosity, edge splits, beveled obverse edge, central depressions, weight 5.767 g, maximum diameter 22.3 mm, die axis 0o, Kyzikos (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, c. 200 - 100 B.C.; obverse bull butting right on exergue line; reverse flaming torch, KYZI/KHNΩN in two flanking downward lines starting on the right, monogram (control) lower right; ex Ancient Imports (Marc Breitsprecher); $115.00 (101.20)


Julia Mamaea, Augusta 13 March 222 - February or March 235 A.D.

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Vesta was originally a household spirit. Later she was personified as the goddess of the hearth and given the stature of her Greek equivalent, Hestia. In the temple of Vesta, her sacred flame was kept alive by Vestal Virgins. In 394, by order of the Christian emperor Theodosius I in his campaign to eliminate pagan practices in Rome, the fire of Vesta was extinguished.
RS92953. Silver denarius, RIC IV 360; RSC III 81; BMCRE VI p. 152, 381; Hunter III 7, SRCV II 8217, VF, nice portrait, well centered, porous, edge cracks, weight 2.156 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 226 A.D.; obverse IVLIA MAMAEA AVG, diademed and draped bust right; reverse VESTA, Vesta standing half-left, veiled head left, palladium in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand; $60.00 (52.80)


Judean Kingdom, Herod Agrippa I, 37 - 44 A.D.

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Agrippa was son of Aristobulus and Bernice, a grandson of Herod the Great. He spent his boyhood at the imperial court in Rome. His friend Caligula bestowed former territories of Philip and Herod Antipas. Claudius bestowed Judaea. He had James, the brother of John, executed (Acts 12:1-2) and imprisoned Peter (Acts 12:3-5).
JD93870. Bronze prutah, Hendin 1244, Meshorer TJC 120, RPC I 4981, SNG ANS 252, Sofaer 153, F, uneven strike, light earthen deposits, reverse edge beveled, sprues, weight 2.562 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, die axis 0o, Jerusalem mint, 41 - 42 A.D.; obverse AΓPIΠA BACIΛEWC (King Agrippa), umbrella-like canopy with fringes; reverse three heads of barley between two leaves, flanked by L - ς (year 6); $20.00 (17.60)


Judean Kingdom, Herod Agrippa I, 37 - 44 A.D.

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Agrippa was son of Aristobulus and Bernice, a grandson of Herod the Great. He spent his boyhood at the imperial court in Rome. His friend Caligula bestowed former territories of Philip and Herod Antipas. Claudius bestowed Judaea. He had James, the brother of John, executed (Acts 12:1-2) and imprisoned Peter (Acts 12:3-5).
JD93871. Bronze prutah, Hendin 1244, Meshorer TJC 120, RPC I 4981, SNG ANS 252, Sofaer 153, F, brown-green patina, light marks, light corrosion, obverse edge beveled, sprues, weight 2.771 g, maximum diameter 16.9 mm, die axis 315o, Jerusalem mint, 41 - 42 A.D.; obverse AΓPIΠA BACIΛEWC (King Agrippa), umbrella-like canopy with fringes; reverse three heads of barley between two leaves, flanked by L - ς (year 6); $20.00 (17.60)


Judean Kingdom, Herod Agrippa I, 37 - 44 A.D.

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Agrippa was son of Aristobulus and Bernice, a grandson of Herod the Great. He spent his boyhood at the imperial court in Rome. His friend Caligula bestowed former territories of Philip and Herod Antipas. Claudius bestowed Judaea. He had James, the brother of John, executed (Acts 12:1-2) and imprisoned Peter (Acts 12:3-5).
JD93872. Bronze prutah, Hendin 1244, Meshorer TJC 120, RPC I 4981, SNG ANS 252, Sofaer 153, F, obverse off center, porous, obverse edge beveled, sprues, weight 1.989 g, maximum diameter 16.8 mm, die axis 0o, Jerusalem mint, 41 - 42 A.D.; obverse AΓPIΠA BACIΛEWC (King Agrippa), umbrella-like canopy with fringes; reverse three heads of barley between two leaves, flanked by L - ς (year 6); $18.00 (15.84)




  







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