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Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D.

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Liberalitas coin types attest to occasions when the emperor has displayed his generosity towards the people by a distribution to them of money, provisions, or both. The first mention of Liberalitas was on coins of Hadrian. It was a type frequently repeated by the succeeding emperors. Indeed these instances of imperial generosity are more carefully recorded on coins than they are by history. Liberality is personified by the image of a woman, holding in one hand a counting board, or square tablet with a handle on which are cut a certain number of holes. These boards were used to quickly count the proper number of coins or other items for distribution to each person. In the other hand she holds a cornucopia, to indicate the prosperity of the state and the abundance of wheat contained in the public graineries.
RB91023. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV 180a, Cohen V 88, Hunter III 88, SRCV III 8999, VF, green patina, well centered, excellent portrait, light corrosion, porosity, weight 21.816 g, maximum diameter 29.9 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, c. 245 A.D.; obverse IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse LIBERALITAS AVGG II, Liberalitas standing half-left, coin counting board in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking low across field; from the Eric J. Engstrom Collection; scarce; $170.00 (149.60)


Trajan Decius, July 249 - First Half of June 251 A.D.

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In Roman religion, every man has a genius, a presiding spirit. In De Die Natali, Censorinus says, from the moment we are born, we live under the guard and tutelage of Genius. Cities, organizations, and peoples also had a genius. On coins, we find inscriptions to the Genius of the Roman people, of the Senate, of the Emperor, etc. The legend GENI ILLVRICI dedicates this coin to the Genius of Illyria (an area in the western Balkans).
RB91024. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV 117a, Cohen V 53, Hunter III 34, SRCV III 9404, VF, superb portrait, attractive patina, small squared flan, edge crack, weight 13.228 g, maximum diameter 27.6 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 249 - 251 A.D.; obverse IMP C M Q TRAIANVS DECIVS AVG, laureate and cuirassed bust right; reverse GENIVS EXERC ILLVRICIANI, Genius standing left, naked except for polos on head, patera in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, standard behind, S - C (senatus consulto) across field below center; from the Eric J. Engstrom Collection; scarce; $120.00 (105.60)


Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Antiocheia, Pisidia

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Pisidia's geographic and strategic position made it difficult to maintain peace. To strengthen control, Rome colonized the area with military veterans, who were attracted to the area by the fertile soil. An important Roman colony, Antiocheia was, like Rome, divided into seven quarters called "vici" on seven hills. The formal language was Latin until the end of the 3rd century A.D.
RP91512. Bronze AE 26, Krzyzanowska p.188, IV/4; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -; SNG PfPs -; SNG Leypold -; BMC Lycia -, gF, well centered, light marks, scattered porosity, weight 10.902 g, maximum diameter 26.1 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch in Pisidia (Yalvac, Turkey) mint, c. 244 - 249 A.D.; obverse IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse CAES AN-TIOCHI - COLO (clockwise from lower left), vexillum flanked by two standards, all surmounted by eagles, S - R in inner fields; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; $40.00 (35.20)


Vitellius, 2 January - 20 December 69 A.D.

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The reverse inscription abbreviates Senatus Populusque Romanus Ob Cives Servatos, meaning "[Awarded by] the senate and the Roman people for saving citizens." The wreath on the reverse is the corona civica, the oak wreath awarded to Roman citizens ex senatus consulto (by special decree of the Senate) for saving the life of another citizen by slaying an enemy in battle. It became a prerogative for Roman emperors to be awarded the Civic Crown, originating with Augustus, who was awarded it in 27 B.C. for saving the lives of citizens by ending the series of civil wars.
RS91559. Silver denarius, RIC I 83 (S), BMCRE I 15; RSC II 86, BnF III 45, Hunter I 6, SRCV I 2199, F/aF, attractive portrait, toned, bumps and scratches, weight 2.667 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, May - Jul 69 A.D.; obverse A VITELLIVS GERMAN IMP TR P, laureate head right; reverse S P Q R / OB / C S in three lines within the Corona Civica, an oak wreath awarded "for saving the lives of citizens"; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; rare; $190.00 (167.20)


Trajan Decius, July 249 - First Half of June 251 A.D.

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The Dacian Draco was the standard ensign of troops of the ancient Dacian people, which can be seen in the hands of the soldiers of Decebalus in several scenes depicted on Trajan's Column in Rome, Italy. It has the form of a dragon with open wolf-like jaws containing several metal tongues. The hollow dragon's head was mounted on a pole with a fabric tube affixed at the rear. In use, the draco was held up into the wind, or above the head of a horseman, where it filled with air and gave the impression it was alive while making a shrill sound as the wind passed through its strips of material.Draco

RB91613. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV 112b; Cohen V 18, SRCV III 9399, Hunter III 32 var. (bust), TOOLED, mostly just smoothing but also some tooling, weight 19.104 g, maximum diameter 30.6 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 249 - 251 A.D.; obverse IMP C M Q TRAIANVS DECIVS AVG, laureate and cuirassed bust right, from the front; reverse DACIA, Dacia standing facing, head left, wearing robe reaching feet, vertical staff topped with the head of Draco in right hand, S - C (senatus consulto) across field; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; TOOLED, AS IS, NO RETURNS; $.99 (.87)


Trajan Decius, July 249 - First Half of June 251 A.D.

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In 249, Trajan Decius put down a revolt in Moesia and Pannonia. After his legionaries proclaimed him emperor, he marched them to Verona, where he defeated and killed Philip the Arab.
RB91614. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV 124a (S), Hunter III 54, Cohen V 87, SRCV III 9407, F, some corrosion, reverse a little off center, edge split, weight 18.880 g, maximum diameter 29.6 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 250 - Jun 251 A.D.; obverse IMP C M Q TRAIANVS DECIVS AVG, laureate and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse PANNONIAE, the two Pannoniae standing facing, looking away from each other, each holding a standard, S - C across field below center; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; scarce; $70.00 (61.60)


Roman Empire, Two Roman Imitative Barbarous Radiates, c. 270 A.D.

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During the Crisis of the Third Century (235 - 284 A.D.) the Roman Empire nearly collapsed under the combined pressures of invasion, civil war, plague, and economic depression. In the western provinces, official mints did not meet the needs for low-value coinage and unofficial private mints struck imitations of Roman coins (usually antoniniani). These unofficial imitations, called barbarous radiates today, were not counterfeits. They were smaller than standard issues, were not intended to deceive, and probably only functioned as small change.
RA91692. Two barbarous radiates, 1) imitative of a Quintillus antoninianus (r. 270 A.D., 2.132g, 20.3mm) and 2) imitative of a Claudius Gothicus antoninianus (r. 268 - 270 A.D., 1.733g, 16.5mm); from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; $60.00 (52.80)


Claudius, 25 January 41 - 13 October 54 A.D.

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Constantia is the personification of consistency. On Roman coinage, she is found only on coins struck under Claudius. A typical example of the fabricated propaganda on Roman coinage, consistency was a characteristic that Claudius lacked. His biographer Suctonius said of him, "In the faculties of reflection and discernment, his mind was remarkably variable and contrasted, he being sometimes circumspect and sagacious; at others inconsiderate and hasty, often frivolous and as though he were out of his wits." On the other hand, BMC notes, that Constantia personifies courage, endurance and resolution in civil life - the quality that enabled Claudius to bear the trials of his early years.
RB91824. Copper as, RIC I 111, BMCRE I 199, BnF II 226, Cohen I 14, SRCV I 1857, weight 7.333 g, maximum diameter 25.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 50 - 54 A.D.; obverse TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP P P, bare head left; reverse CONSTANTIAE AVGVSTI (consistency of the emperor), Constantia standing left, in helmet and chiton, raising right hand, spear vertical behind in left, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field; $.99 (.87)


Antonia, Daughter of Mark Antony, Wife of Nero Drusus, Mother of Claudius, Grandmother of Caligula

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Antonia was daughter of Marc Antony and Octavia, wife of Nero Claudius Drusus, sister-in-law of Tiberius, mother of Claudius, and grandmother of Caligula. Renowned for her beauty and virtue, Antonia spent her long life revered by the Roman people and enjoyed many honors conferred upon her by her relatives. All her coinage was issued early in the reign of Claudius. She died around 37 A.D., possibly as a result of forced suicide ordered by Caligula.
RB91827. Orichalcum dupondius, RIC I Claudius 92, BMCRE I Claudius 166, Cohen I 6, BnF II Claudius 143, SRCV I 1902, weight 11.960 g, maximum diameter 28.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, struck under Claudius, c. 41 - 50 A.D.; obverse ANTONIA AVGVSTA, bare-headed bust right, hair in long plait; reverse TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP, Claudius standing left, veiled and togate, simpulum in right, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field; $.99 (.87)


Saitta, Lydia, c. 193 - 268 A.D.

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Saitta (or Saittai) was in eastern Lydia, in the triangle between the upper Hyllus river (modern Demirci ayı) and the Hermus river (modern Sidaskale). Representations of the river gods are found on coins of the Imperial Period. The moon god Mn Akziottenos was honored, but Zeus, Dionysos, Aphrodite, Hygieia, Asklepios, Apollo, Kybele, and Herakles were also revered at Saitta. The town was a regional center for textile production. Hadrian probably visited in 124 A.D. In the city, In the Christian era Saittai was attached to the Archbishopric of Sardeis.
RP91828. Bronze AE 28, SNG Leypold 1151 (same dies); BMC Lydia p. 217, 29; SNG Cop 399, F, light corrosion/porosity, scratches, edge cracks, weight 8.121 g, maximum diameter 27.6 mm, die axis 180o, Saitta (Sidaskale, Turkey) mint, c. 193 - 268 A.D.; obverse IEPA-CVN KΛHT-OC, draped bust of the Roman Senate right; reverse CAITT-HNΩN, Athena standing facing, head left, wearing crested Corinthian helmet and chiton, owl(?) in right hand, grounded shield and spear in left hand; $45.00 (39.60)




  







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