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Larissa, Thessaly, Greece, c. 300 - 150 B.C.

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According to mythology, Larissa was founded by Acrisius, who was killed accidentally by his grandson, Perseus; the nymph Larissa was a daughter of the primordial man Pelasgu; Achilles was born at Larissa, and Hippocrates, the "Father of Medicine"; died there. Today, Larissa is the capital and largest city of the Thessaly region and an important commercial, agricultural, and industrial center of Greece.
GB92063. Bronze trichalkon, BCD Thessaly 1172.1 (same countermark), BCD Thessaly II 394.1 (same countermark), SNG Cop 147, Rogers 309, HGC 4 530 (S), BMC Thessaly -, VF, well centered, attractive dark patina, interesting countermark, some flatness of strike, edge crack, beveled obverse edge; c/m: VF, weight 11.952 g, maximum diameter 22.2 mm, die axis 270o, Larissa mint, c. 300 - 150 B.C.; obverse head of the nymph Larissa right, monogram behind; countermark on cheek: spiked helmet with visor, neck and cheek guards in a c. 6mm oval punch; reverse cavalryman prancing right, wearing spiked helmet, couched lance in right hand, star upper left, ΛA-PI/ΣNΩN divided above and below; ex Numismatik Lanz München, auction 112 (25 Nov 2002), 193; scarce; $400.00 (€352.00)


Larissa, Thessaly, Greece, c. 356 - 337 B.C.

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After 344, Larissa fell under Macedonian rule. The horse was an appropriate symbol of Thessaly, a land of plains, which was well-known for its horses.
GB92101. Bronze tetrachalkon, BCD Thessaly II 387.8, Rogers 273, Weber 2864, HGC 4 517, F, dark patina, some corrosion/porosity, obverse edge beveled, weight 9.307 g, maximum diameter 21.7 mm, die axis 270o, Larissa mint, c. 356 - 337 B.C.; obverse head of the nymph Larissa facing slightly left, wearing necklace, drop earrings, and ampyx; reverse ΛAPI−Σ−AIΩN (starting upper left, Σ downward on right, ending in exergue, N retrograde), bridled horse trotting right without rider, E above left, stalk of grain below diagonal with top left; $50.00 (€44.00)


Phokis, Greece, Phokian League Federal Coinage, Late 4th or Early 3rd Century B.C.

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BCD writes of this and similar types with Athena on the obverse and the abbreviated ethnic in a wreath on the reverse, "It is hoped that the multitude of styles and the differences in the fabric and flan evident amongst these coins will help vindicate the writer's believe that we are dealing with an assortment of types that were struck on odd occasions and within a time span of more than a century." Kroll dates this type (based on the Agora deposit A18: 8 [IGCH 157]) to "early third century BC, in any case well after the Third Sacred War."
GB93474. Bronze AE 14, BCD Lokris 358.4 ff. (no die matches); SNG Cop 117; BMC Central Greece p. 20, 76; HGC 4 1114, gVF, light deposits, die wear, weight 2.492 g, maximum diameter 13.6 mm, die axis 90o, Phokis mint, late 4th or early 3rd century B.C.; obverse head and neck of Athena, facing slightly right, helmeted; reverse ΦΩ within wreath without berries, tied below; ex Errett Bishop Collection; $50.00 (€44.00)


Dyrrhachion, Illyria, Greece, Roman Protectorate, c. 229 - 30 B.C.

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This type circulated alongside, and presumably at parity with, Roman Republican denarii. BMC calls the figure on the right side of the obverse a statue. Ceka identifies it as a female. The figure can be identified as Harpokrates by the a hem-hem crown and right index finger up to the lips.
MA93697. Silver drachm, Ceka 325 corr., BMC Thessaly p. 71, 94, weight 2.960 g, maximum diameter 17.6 mm, Dyrrhachium (Durrës, Albania) mint, c. 229 - 30 B.C.; obverse MENIΣKOΣ, cow right, head turned back toward suckling calf left; on right: Harpokrates standing facing wearing hemhem crown, finger to lips; reverse ∆YP − ΛY−KIΣ−KOY, double stellate pattern within double linear square with sides curved inward; $30.16 (€26.54)


Dyrrhachion, Illyria, Greece, Roman Protectorate, c. 229 - 30 B.C.

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This type circulated alongside, and presumably at parity with, Roman Republican denarii. BMC calls the figure on the right side of the obverse a statue. Ceka identifies it as a female. The figure can be identified as Harpokrates by the a hem-hem crown and right index finger up to the lips.
MA93698. Silver drachm, Ceka 325 corr., BMC Thessaly p. 71, 94, weight 2.219 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, Dyrrhachium (Durrës, Albania) mint, obverse MENIΣKOΣ, cow right, head turned back toward suckling calf left; on right: Harpokrates standing facing wearing hemhem crown, finger to lips; reverse ∆YP − ΛY−KIΣ−KOY, double stellate pattern within double linear square with sides curved inward; $70.00 (€61.60)


Kingdom of Thrace, Lysimachos, 305 - 281 B.C., Portrait of Alexander the Great

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Thompson notes that Pyrrhus held Pella until 286 B.C. It was one of the last, if not the last, mint opened by Lysimachos. Twenty-six obverse dies are known for the tetradrachms.
SH93849. Silver tetradrachm, Thompson 248, HGC 3.2 1750p (S), Müller 353 var. (monogram in ex.), VF, superb high relief portrait, light toning with some darker spots, bumps and marks, weight 16.645 g, maximum diameter 29.5 mm, die axis 180o, Pella mint, 286 - 281 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Alexander the Great wearing the horn of Ammon; reverse Athena enthroned left, Nike crowning name in her right hand, resting left arm on grounded round shield behind, transverse spear against right side, HP monogram outer left, monogram inner left, BAΣIΛEΩΣ downward on right, ΛYΣIMAXOY downward on left; ex Divus Numismatik; scarce; $750.00 (€660.00)


Kingdom of Thrace, Lysimachos, 305 - 281 B.C., Portrait of Alexander the Great

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Thompson notes that Lampsacus was Lysimachos largest mint in Asia Minor, with approximately 150 known obverse dies. Output from Lampsacus declined when Amphipolis began its extensive coinage c. 288 B.C.
SH93850. Silver tetradrachm, Thompson 47, Müller 401, SNG BnF 2540, HGC 3.2 1750b, VF, spectacular high relief portrait, light tone, well centered, bumps and scratches, porosity, weight 16.739 g, maximum diameter 28.6 mm, die axis 0o, Mysia, Lampsakos (Lapseki, Turkey) mint, 297 - 281 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Alexander the Great wearing the horn of Ammon; reverse Athena enthroned left, Nike crowning name in her right hand, resting left arm on grounded round shield behind, transverse spear against right side, HP monogram inner left, crescent with horns left in exergue, BAΣIΛEΩΣ downward on right, ΛYΣIMAXOY downward on left; ex Divus Numismatik; $650.00 (€572.00)


Constantius Gallus, Caesar, 28 September 351 - Winter 354 A.D.

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In 351, in India, a new process was invented for the extraction of sugar from sugarcane.
RL88587. Billon maiorina, RIC VIII Siscia 337 (S), LRBC II 1207, SRCV V 18971, Cohen VIII 13, Hunter V -, F, green patina, tight flan, flatly struck, weight 3.992 g, maximum diameter 20.1 mm, die axis 0o, 3rd officina, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, 28 Sep 351 - winter 354 A.D.; obverse D N CONSTANTIVS IVN NOB C, bare-headed, draped, and cuirassed bust right, A behind; reverse FEL TEMP REPARATIO (happy times restored), helmeted soldier with shield on his left arm spearing a fallen horseman, oval shield on the ground at feet, *ΓSIS crescent in exergue; $16.00 (€14.08)


Constantius Gallus, Caesar, 28 September 351 - Winter 354 A.D.

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In 351, Constantius Gallus built a new church in honor of Saint Babylas at Daphne, a suburb of Antioch, and transferred the remains of the bishop to it to neutralize the pagan effects of the nearby temple of Apollo. In 362, Julian consulted the oracle of Apollo at the temple in Daphne, but received no answer, and was told that it was because of the proximity of the saint. He had the sarcophagus of the martyr exhumed and removed. A few days later, on October 22, a mysterious fire broke out consuming the roof of the temple and the statue of the god, copied from Phidias' statue of Zeus at Olympia. Julian, suspecting angry Christians, closed the cathedral of Antioch and ordered an investigation. Ammianus Marcellinus reports "a frivolous rumor" laid blame on candles lit by a worshipper late the previous night (XXII, 13). John Chrysostom claimed a bolt of lightning set the temple on fire. The remains of Babylas were reinterred in a church dedicated to him on the other side of the River Orontes.
RL88596. Billon reduced maiorina, RIC VIII Sirmium 49, LRBC II 1604, SRCV V 19015, Cohen VIII 14, Hunter V -, aVF, dark patina, old cut across obverse, tight flan, edge a bit ragged, weight 1.91 g, maximum diameter 17.2 mm, die axis 0o, 2nd officina, Sirmium (Sremska Mitrovica, Serbia) mint, 28 Sep 351 - winter 354 A.D.; obverse D N CONSTANTIVS IVN NOB C, bare-headed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse FEL TEMP RE-PARATIO (happy times restored), soldier standing left spearing fallen bare-headed horseman, horseman extends arm toward soldier, shield at feet, BSIRM in exergue; $.99 (€.87)


Constantius II, 22 May 337 - 3 November 361 A.D.

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Constantius II, unlike his father, allowed Christians to persecute pagans and Jews. Christian clergy inspired angry crowds, which attacked and destroyed synagogues and temples. On 7 May 351, a Jewish revolt broke out in Palestine. The rebels destroyed the Roman garrison in a surprise night attack and acquired the garrison's weapons. The rebels destroyed Diopolis and Tiberias and killed the people of different ethnicities, including Greeks and Samaritans. In 352, Constantius Gallus sent his general (magister equitum) Ursicinus to put down the revolt. Diocesarea, the epicenter of the revolt, was razed to the ground. Ursicinus ordered the execution of thousands of Jews, even children. After the revolt, a permanent garrison was stationed in Galilee.
BB88802. Bronze reduced maiorina, RIC VIII Cyzicus 104 & 110, LRBC II 2496 & 2498, SRCV V 18285, Cohen VII 47, F, well centered, earthen deposits, ragged flan, weight 2.965 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 180o, 4th officina, Cyzicus (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, 28 Sep 351 - 3 Nov 361 A.D.; obverse D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse FEL TEMP REPARATIO (happy times restored), soldier advancing left, spearing fallen horseman wearing a pointed cap and raising hand, oval shield at feet, SMK∆ in exergue; $12.00 (€10.56)




  







Catalog current as of Tuesday, November 12, 2019.
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