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Kingdom of Naples, Phillip III of Spain, 13 September 1598 - 31 March 1621

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Naples was ruled by the Crown of Aragon as part of the Spanish Empire from 1504 to 1714.
ME66316. Bronze 2 cavalli, MIR Napoli 231 (R2), F, uneven strike, tight flan, weight 2.182 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 0o, Naples mint, obverse + PHILIPP III D G REX ARA, two flints and two flint locks forming a cross, a flame in each angle; reverse SICILIAE ET HIERVSA, crown, two crossed scepters inside; rare; $45.00 (€39.60)


Kingdom of Naples, Phillip III of Spain, 13 September 1598 - 31 March 1621

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Naples was ruled by the Crown of Aragon as part of the Spanish Empire from 1504 to 1714.
ME66318. Bronze 2 cavalli, MIR Napoli 225/6, aF, weight 3.954 g, maximum diameter 23.9 mm, die axis 180o, Naples mint, 1620; obverse + PHILIPP III D G REX, cornucopia overflowing with bunches of grapes, other fruit, and stalks of grain, 16-20 flanking across field; reverse * VIGILAT ET CVSTODIT (watches and keeps), recumbent lion atop round altar with ornamented side; rare (R2); $36.00 (€31.68)


Kingdom of Naples and Sicily, Charles I of Anjou, 1266 - 1285

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Charles I of Anjou was the King of Sicily by conquest from 1266, though he had received it as a papal grant in 1262. He was expelled from the island in the aftermath of the Sicilian Vespers of 1282.
ME66338. Billon denaro, MIR 10 347 (R3), Biaggi 493 var. (R), MEC Italy III 643, VF, weight 0.405 g, maximum diameter 15.9 mm, die axis 135o, Apulia, Brindisi mint, early coinage, 1266 - 1278; obverse K DEI GRA REX SCL, cross fleury; reverse + DVC AP ET PRIC CAPE, shield with lis and three pendants, flanked by two small lis; rare; $45.00 (€39.60)


Armenian Kingdom, Tigranes V (Herodian Tigranes I), c. 6 - 12 A.D.

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"The reign of Tigranes V has generally been described as uneventful; his coins are similarly unremarkable. They do not commemorate any historical or military events but merely copy designs common to the Seleucid and autonomous city coinage of Mesopotamia, Syria, and Phoenicia. The standing Herakles/Vahagn, which was employed extensively by Tigranes the Great (CCA, 99-103), would have had particular appeal for the Phoenician population, as well as the Armenian." -- Frank L. Kovacs in "Tigranes IV, V, and VI: New Attributions"
SH66378. Bronze chalkous, Kovacs AJN 20 10, Bedoukian CCA 156 (Tigranes IV), Nercessian ACV 166 (same, half chalkous), F, green patina, tight flan, off-center, weight 2.347 g, maximum diameter 13.7 mm, die axis 0o, Damascus(?) mint, c. 6 - 12 A.D.; obverse heavily bearded head of Tigranes IV right, wearing Armenian tiara; reverse BAΣIΛEΩC TIΓPANOY MEΓAΛOY, eagle standing left, wings closed; rare; $45.00 (€39.60)


Kingdom of Naples and Sicily, Charles I of Anjou, 1266 - 1285

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Charles I of Anjou was the King of Sicily by conquest from 1266, though he had received it as a papal grant in 1262. He was expelled from the island in the aftermath of the Sicilian Vespers of 1282.
ME66658. Bronze denaro, MIR 10 356 (R), MEC Italy III 665, Biaggi 499 var. (legends reversed, NC), VF, weight 0.546 g, maximum diameter 15.9 mm, die axis 90o, Brindisi mint, 1277; obverse + •DEI•GRA•REX•SICIL•, •K• in frame of six arches; reverse + DVC APVL PRIC CAP, cross with trefoil at each end and star in each quarter; $45.00 (€39.60)


Lot of 25 Prutot, Judean Kingdom, Herod Agrippa I, 37 - 44 A.D.

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LT68226. Bronze Lot, Hendin 1244, lot of 25 prutot (singular: prutah), Jerusalem mint, 41 - 42 A.D.; obverse AΓPIΠA BACIΛEWC (King Agrippa), umbrella-like canopy with fringes; reverse three heads of barley between two leaves, flanked by L - ς (year 6); actual coins in the photograph, as is, no returns; $225.00 (€198.00)


Larissa, Thessaly, Greece, 380 - 337 B.C.

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The horse was an appropriate symbol of Thessaly, a land of plains, which was well-known for its horses.
GB67674. Bronze chalkous, BCD Thessaly 1171.2; cf. BCD Thessaly II 392.1-3; Rogers Thessaly 297 corr.; BMC Thessaly p. 32, 92; SNG Cop -, VF, weight 1.855 g, maximum diameter 14.2 mm, die axis 0o, Larissa mint, 380 - 337 B.C.; obverse head of nymph Larissa right, her hair rolled up around her head, wearing triple-drop pendant earring; reverse ΛAPIΣ/AIΩN, crouching horse left, about to roll, bent right foreleg; $40.00 (€35.20)


Kingdom of Naples and Sicily, Charles II of Anjou, 1285 - 1309

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When his father died, Charles was a prisoner of Peter III of Aragon. King Edward I of England mediated peace, and Charles was liberated on the condition that he was to retain Naples alone. Sicily was left to the Aragonese. Three of his sons and 60 nobles were sent as hostages for his release. Pope Nicholas IV immediately absolved Charles from all the conditions he had sworn to observe, crowned him King of Sicily in 1289, and excommunicated King Alfonso III of Aragon. The two sides fought for the next 13 years until Charles finally gave up all rights to Sicily, agreed to marry his daughter Eleanor to King Frederick, and lived the rest of his life peacefully in Naples.
ME70445. Billon denaro, MIR Napoli 25, Biaggi 1631, MEC Italy III 689, aF, weight 0.523 g, maximum diameter 17.1 mm, die axis 90o, Naples mint, 1290 - 1292; obverse +: KAROL': SCD': REX:, crowned bust facing; reverse +: IERL': ET: SICIL':, cross fleurée; $32.00 (€28.16)


Kingdom of Naples and Sicily, Conrad II (Conradin), King of Jerusalem and Sicily, 1254 - 1258

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Conrad II in Sicily was officially Conrad III in Jerusalem but was called "the Younger" or "the Boy," and most often the diminutive "Conradin." Conradin was an infant when he assumed the throne. Manfred his regent, although only about 18 years old, acted loyally and with vigor in the execution of his trust. However, upon a false rumor of Conradin's death, Manfred was crowned king 1258 and refused to abdicate when the rumor was proved false. Pope Clement IV defeated and killed Manfred. At age 16, Conradin was defeated and beheaded by Charles of Anjou, ending the legitimate Hohenstaufen line.
ME70458. Billon denaro, MIR 10 310 (R3), MEC Italy III 590, Biaggi 482 var. (no R at end of reverse legend), Spahr 166, VF, centered, weight 0.764 g, maximum diameter 15.9 mm, die axis 0o, Brindisi mint, 1254 - 1258; obverse •+• C•SECVNDVS, crowned eagle facing with head left; reverse •+• IER ET SICIL'•R, cross pattée, pellet in second and third quarters; rare; $40.00 (€35.20)


Kingdom of Sicily, Charles of Anjou, 1266 - 1285

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Charles received the Kingdom of Sicily as a papal grant but had to take it by force from the Hohenstaufen. In 1282, he was expelled from Sicily by rebellion. He continued to claim the island, but ruled only the peninsula from his capital at Naples. By conquest he became King of Albania in 1272, by purchase King of Jerusalem in 1277, and he inherited the Principality of Achaea in 1278.
ME70461. Billon denaro, MIR 10 353 (R), Biaggi 497 (R), MEC Italy III 650, Spahr 47, VF, nice green patina, weight 0.903 g, maximum diameter 16.8 mm, Brindisi mint, early coinage, 1266 - 1278; obverse + K DEI GRA REX SICIL', large lis above narrow crescent with horns up; reverse + DVC APVL' ET PRNC CAP, cross fleury; rare; $40.00 (€35.20)




  







Catalog current as of Wednesday, January 22, 2020.
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