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NGC Certification and Encapsulation Service with NGC Photography

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If you order an uncertified coin from Forum and would like it certified and would like NGC to photograph your coin in the holder, add this to your shopping cart. If you would like more than one coin certified, change the quantity in your cart to order more than one certification. We will send the coin you order to NGC for certification and then ship to you after your coin has been encapsulated. Most coins we sell can be certified, but NGC does not certify all types and coins for a variety of reasons. We will advise you if you order certification for a coin that is unlikely to be certified. If NGC does not certify a coin for any reason, we will cancel and refund for both the coin and certification with store credit. Certification can take up to 90 days.
AL21809. NGC Certification and Encapsulation Service with NGC Photography, $69.00 (€60.72)


Late Roman, Holyland (Syro-Palestinian), Jewish "Candlestick" Oil Lamp, c. 350 - 500 A.D.

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The pattern on the nozzle, branches issuing from a central ridge, is often called a "candlestick," meaning it is a representation of the menorah. A more menorah-like variation has the "candlestick" on a tripod base. Some authorities believe it is a palm branch and it is sometimes indecisively called a a palm-menorah. The strongest evidence that the palm-menorah actually is a menorah is a variation of this lamp with a cross on the nozzle. This suggests that Jews and Christians used the same type of lamp, differentiated only by their respective religious symbol, a phenomenon also encountered on North African Red-Slip Lamps. The type is found across Israel but most commonly in Jerusalem and within 50 kilometers of Jerusalem.
AL21819. Jewish Small "Candlestick" Oil Lamp; cf. Schloessinger 477, Menzel 657, Adler 905, Bailey BMC Q2300; 8.0 cm (3 1/8") long, Choice, complete and intact, much of slip lost, light bumps, small earlier variety, c. 350 - 500 A.D.; pink-buff light clay, traces of cream slip, tear drop shape from above, no handle, double rim around filling hole, decorative radiating pattern around shoulder continues on the nozzle with six branches from a central ridge (palm-menorah), ring base; $270.00 (€237.60)


Late Roman - Byzantine, Holyland (Syro-Palestinian), "Elongated" Pottery Oil Lamp, c. 400 - 620 A.D.

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This type is identified by Adler as a Transjordan elongated lamp. Adler writes that the shoulders are narrow and ornamented with a wide variety of motifs including linear bands, geometric, and floral designs; the handle is tongue shaped projecting horizontally and decorated with three or more bands; the nozzle is decorated with geometric or floral designs or rarely a cross. The type is found in the northern part of Transjordan, and in Israel, mainly in northern Israel and the Beit Shean area. They date to the fifth and sixth century but possibly also the beginning of the seventh century. In the Hellenistic and Roman eras Beit Shean was the Decapolis city Scythopolis. Click the photo on the right of the ancient ruins at Beit Shean, to learn more about the city. Scythopolis

AL21906. Transjordan elongated lamp; Adler type JOR.1, cf. 967 ff.; 8.6 cm (3 3/8") long, near Choice, small chips in filling hole and wick rims, small chips in handle, c. 400 - 600/620 A.D.; pink-orange clay, cream slip, mold made, elongated body, double rim around large filling hole, convex shoulders and sides of nozzle ornamented with a pattern of lines, arcs and dots; $90.00 (€79.20)


Late Roman, Holyland (Syro-Palestinian), Jewish "Candlestick" Oil Lamp, c. 350 - 500 A.D.

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The pattern on the nozzle, branches issuing from a central ridge, is often called a "candlestick," meaning it is a representation of the menorah. A more menorah-like variation has the "candlestick" on a tripod base. Some authorities believe it is a palm branch and it is sometimes indecisively called a a palm-menorah. The strongest evidence that the palm-menorah actually is a menorah is a variation of this lamp with a cross on the nozzle. This suggests that Jews and Christians used the same type of lamp, differentiated only by their respective religious symbol, a phenomenon also encountered on North African Red-Slip Lamps. The type is found across Israel but most commonly in Jerusalem and within 50 kilometers of Jerusalem.
AL21763. Jewish Small "Candlestick" Oil Lamp; cf. Schloessinger 477, Menzel 657, Adler 905, Bailey BMC Q2300; 8.0 cm (3 1/8") long, Choice, complete and intact, some bumps, light deposits, small earlier variety, c. 350 - 500 A.D.; pink-buff light clay, traces of a cream slip, tear drop shape from above, no handle, double rim around filling hole, decorative radiating pattern around shoulder continues on the nozzle with six branches from a central ridge (palm-menorah), ring base; $270.00 (€237.60)


Late Roman, Holyland (Syro-Palestinian), Jewish "Candlestick" Oil Lamp, c. 350 - 500 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
The pattern on the nozzle, branches issuing from a central ridge, is often called a "candlestick," meaning it is a representation of the menorah. A more menorah-like variation has the "candlestick" on a tripod base. Some authorities believe it is a palm branch and it is sometimes indecisively called a a palm-menorah. The strongest evidence that the palm-menorah actually is a menorah is a variation of this lamp with a cross on the nozzle. This suggests that Jews and Christians used the same type of lamp, differentiated only by their respective religious symbol, a phenomenon also encountered on North African Red-Slip Lamps. The type is found across Israel but most commonly in Jerusalem and within 50 kilometers of Jerusalem.
AL21776. Jewish Small "Candlestick" Oil Lamp; cf. Schloessinger 477, Menzel 657, Adler 905, Bailey BMC Q2300; 8.2 cm (3 1/4") long, near Choice, intact, bumps, encrustations, chip in filling hole rim, chip rear right shoulder (all visible in photos), small earlier variety, c. 350 - 500 A.D.; pink-buff light clay, tear drop shape from above, no handle, double rim around filling hole, decorative radiating pattern around shoulder continues on the nozzle with six branches from a central ridge (palm-menorah), ring base; $200.00 (€176.00)


Judaean Kingdom - Roman Judaea, Herodian Oil Lamp, c. 25 B.C. - 100 A.D.

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This simple but elegant lamp design was developed during the reign of Herod, and thus they are called Herodian Lamps today. The type is found throughout all of Israel, especially in Jewish towns and areas, such as Jerusalem and Judea. Some have been found in Jordan. It is believed to be a type used mainly by Jews. They remained in common use until the end of the first century. The latest examples, from the middle of the second century, have been found in Judean Desert caves. Attempts have been made to more precisely date some of these lamps based on variations, however, excavations indicate the variations occur simultaneously.
AL93890. Herodian oil lamp; cf. Adler 3.1.HER.3, 96; Hays ROM 53; Schloessinger 331 - 332; 9.3 cm (3 5/8") long, 5.7 cm (2 1/4") wide, Choice, complete and intact, slightest chipping in nozzle, minor encrustations, c. 25 B.C. - 100 A.D.; finely made, pink-orange clay, buff-cream slip, rounded wheel made body with flat top, sharp carination to vertical sides, nozzle with a splayed shape with nearly straight sides hand-formed separately and attached, joint between the nozzle and body smoothed with a knife, rim around filling hole; $270.00 (€237.60)


Judaean Kingdom - Roman Judaea, Herodian Oil Lamp, c. 25 B.C. - 100 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
This simple but elegant lamp design was developed during the reign of Herod, and thus they are called Herodian Lamps today. The type is found throughout all of Israel, especially in Jewish towns and areas, such as Jerusalem and Judea. Some have been found in Jordan. It is believed to be a type used mainly by Jews. They remained in common use until the end of the first century. The latest examples, from the middle of the second century, have been found in Judean Desert caves. Attempts have been made to more precisely date some of these lamps based on variations, however, excavations indicate the variations are simultaneous.

Chips in the filling hole edge are very common and were apparently often made intentionally by their ancient owners. Perhaps the larger hole made filling it easier or perhaps the hole was enlarged to retrieve a wick that fell inside. Despite this interesting historical feature, we will not charge you extra for the extra large hole. In fact, this lamp is considerably cheaper than a similar lamp without the chip.
AL93891. Herodian oil lamp, cf. Adler 3.1.HER.3, 92; Hays ROM 50; Schloessinger 331 - 332; Bailey BMC -; 9.0 cm (3 1/2") long, 6.2 cm (2 7/16") wide, Average+, cuts in the bottom and side of nozzle, chip in top at filling hole, c. 25 B.C. - 100 A.D.; buff-orange clay, cream slip, rounded wheel made body, nozzle with a splayed shape hand-formed separately and attached, joint between the nozzle and body smoothed with a knife, rim outside narrow discus ledge around filling hole; $120.00 (€105.60)


Late Roman - Byzantine, Holyland (Syro-Palestinian), Bi-Lanceolate Pottery Oil Lamp, c. 300 - 500 A.D.

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Adler notes these lamps are found throughout the northern part of Israel, especially in Beit Shean and Hamat Gader, and date to the fourth and fifth centuries. Hamat Gader was already a well known health and recreation site in Roman times, mentioned in Strabo, Origen and Eunapius, as well as the Rabbinic literature. Construction of the bath complex began in the 2nd century by the 10th Roman Legion, which was garrisoned in nearby Gadara. The ancient Hebrew name means hot springs of (the ancient city of) Gadara (modern Umm Qais). The Arabic name El-Hamma preserves this, and the name of the tel located near the site, Tel Bani, is a corruption of the Latin word meaning "baths." The empress Aelia Eudocia composed a poem praising the qualities of the multiple springs which was inscribed so that visitors could see it as they went into the pool. The photo to the right is the ruins of the 5th century synagogue at Hamat Gader. Click the photo to see a larger image.Hammat Gader Synagogue

AL93917. Bi-lanceolate pottery oil lamp; Adler Collection (website) type N2; 7.4 cm (2 7/8") long, Choice, completed and intact, light deposits, c. 300 - 500 A.D.; pink-orange clay, cream-buff slip, mold made with incised decoration, the body includes the entire lamp from tip of nozzle to tip of "tongue" handle, nearly round body, wide rim surrounds a large fill hole, incised herring-bone geometric wreath pattern on narrow convex shoulders, two incised lengthwise lines on the handle; $55.00 (€48.40)


Late Roman - Byzantine, Holyland (Syro-Palestinian), Bi-Lanceolate Pottery Oil Lamp, c. 300 - 500 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Adler notes these lamps are found throughout the northern part of Israel, especially in Beit Shean and Hamat Gader, and date to the fourth and fifth centuries. Hamat Gader was already a well known health and recreation site in Roman times, mentioned in Strabo, Origen and Eunapius, as well as the Rabbinic literature. Construction of the bath complex began in the 2nd century by the 10th Roman Legion, which was garrisoned in nearby Gadara (modern Umm Qais). The ancient Hebrew name means hot springs of (the ancient city of) Gadara. The Arabic name El-Hamma preserves this, and the name of the tel located near the site, Tel Bani, is a corruption of the Latin word meaning "baths." The empress Aelia Eudocia composed a poem praising the qualities of the multiple springs which was inscribed so that visitors could see it as they went into the pool. The photo to the right is of the ancient Roman baths. Click the photo to see a larger image.Hammat Gader Baths

AL93918. Bi-lanceolate pottery oil lamp; Adler Collection (website) type N2; 8.0 cm (3 1/8") long, near Choice, complete and intact, light encrustation, wear, c. 300 - 500 A.D.; pink-buff clay, mold made with incised decoration, the body includes the entire lamp from tip of nozzle to tip of "tongue" handle, wide rim surrounds a large fill hole, incised herring-bone geometric wreath pattern on narrow convex shoulders, two incised lengthwise lines on the handle, incised lines between fill hold rim and nozzle; $45.00 (€39.60)


Late Roman - Byzantine, Holyland (Syro-Palestinian), Bi-Lanceolate Pottery Oil Lamp, c. 300 - 500 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Adler notes these lamps are found throughout the northern part of Israel, especially in Beit Shean and Hamat Gader, and date to the fourth and fifth centuries. Hamat Gader was already a well known health and recreation site in Roman times, mentioned in Strabo, Origen and Eunapius, as well as the Rabbinic literature. Construction of the bath complex began in the 2nd century by the 10th Roman Legion, which was garrisoned in nearby Gadara (modern Umm Qais). The ancient Hebrew name means hot springs of (the ancient city of) Gadara. The Arabic name El-Hamma preserves this, and the name of the tel located near the site, Tel Bani, is a corruption of the Latin word meaning "baths." The empress Aelia Eudocia composed a poem praising the qualities of the multiple springs which was inscribed so that visitors could see it as they went into the pool. The photo to the right is of the ancient Roman baths. Click the photo to see a larger image.Hammat Gader Baths

AL93919. Bi-lanceolate pottery oil lamp; Adler Collection (website) type N2; cf. Schloessinger 450; Bailey BMC -; 7.4 cm (2 7/8") long, near Choice, complete and intact, wear, c. 300 - 500 A.D.; pink-buff clay, mold made with incised and/or punched decoration, the body includes the entire lamp from tip of nozzle to tip of handle, wide rim surrounds a large fill hole, row of pellets in annulets over diagonal lines around shoulders, incised lines lengthwise on handle, annulet and punches ornamentation on the bottom; $55.00 (€48.40)




  







Catalog current as of Tuesday, December 10, 2019.
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