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Seleukid Kingdom, Philip I Philadelphos, c. 94 - 83 or 75 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Philip| |I| |Philadelphos,| |c.| |94| |-| |83| |or| |75| |B.C.|NEW
Philip I Philadelphus was the fourth son of Antiochus VIII Grypus. He took the diadem in 94 B.C. together with his twin brother Antiochus XI Epiphanes, after the eldest son Seleucus VI Epiphanes was killed by their cousin Antiochus X Eusebes. The next year Antiochus X killed Antiochus XI. Antiochus X was probably killed in 88 B.C. Philip's younger brother Demetrius III turned on Philip I and took the capital, but the Philip I prevailed and took Antioch. Their youngest brother Antiochus XII took Damascus. Philip I tried to take Damascus, after which he disappears from the historical record, which does not tell us how or when he died. His death is traditionally dated 83 B.C. but Numismatic evidence and clues in ancient literature indicate that Philip I might have died in 75 B.C. His coins remained in circulation when the Romans conquered Syria in 64 B.C. Roman authorities in Syria continued to issue coins modeled on Philip I's coins, including his portrait, until 13 B.C.
GY95954. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber II 2463.3h, Newell SMA 448, SNG Spaer 2807, HGC 9 1319, gVF, toning, porosity, light corrosion, weight 14.971 g, maximum diameter 25.3 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, c. 88 - 75 B.C.; obverse diademed head right, fillet border; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ / ΦIΛIΠΠOY EΠIΦANOYΣ / ΦIΛA∆EΛΦOY, Zeus enthroned left, nude to waist, himation around hips and legs Nike in right hand crowning him with wreath, long scepter in left hand, Φ/A left outer left, ΛI monogram under throne, Π in exergue, laurel wreath border; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $250.00 (€230.00)


Seleukid Kingdom, Philip I Philadelphos, c. 94 - 83 or 75 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Philip| |I| |Philadelphos,| |c.| |94| |-| |83| |or| |75| |B.C.|NEW
Philip I Philadelphus was the fourth son of Antiochus VIII Grypus. He took the diadem in 94 B.C. together with his twin brother Antiochus XI Epiphanes, after the eldest son Seleucus VI Epiphanes was killed by their cousin Antiochus X Eusebes. The next year Antiochus X killed Antiochus XI. Antiochus X was probably killed in 88 B.C. Philip's younger brother Demetrius III turned on Philip I and took the capital, but the Philip I prevailed and took Antioch. Their youngest brother Antiochus XII took Damascus. Philip I tried to take Damascus, after which he disappears from the historical record, which does not tell us how or when he died. His death is traditionally dated 83 B.C. but Numismatic evidence and clues in ancient literature indicate that Philip I might have died in 75 B.C. His coins remained in circulation when the Romans conquered Syria in 64 B.C. Roman authorities in Syria continued to issue coins modeled on Philip I's coins, including his portrait, until 13 B.C.
SH95955. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber II 2463.2e, Newell SMA 440, SNG Spaer 2801, HGC 9 1319, Choice gVF, old cabinet toning, light scratches, weight 16.117 g, maximum diameter 26.0 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, c. 88 - 75 B.C.; obverse diademed head right, fillet border; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ / ΦIΛIΠΠOY EΠIΦANOYΣ / ΦIΛA∆EΛΦOY, Zeus enthroned left, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, Nike in right hand crowning him with wreath, long scepter in left hand, Φ/A left, Θ inner left, laurel wreath border; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $300.00 (€276.00)


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus IX Cyzicenus, 113 - 95 B.C

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Antiochus| |IX| |Cyzicenus,| |113| |-| |95| |B.C|NEW
After Antiochus IX's father died, his uncle Demetrius II Nicator took the throne. For his safety, his mother, Cleopatra Thea, sent him to Cyzicus (leading to his nickname). He returned to Syria in 116 B.C. to claim the throne from his half-brother Antiochus VIII Grypus, with whom he eventually divided Syria. He was killed in battle by the son of Grypus, Seleucus VI Epiphanes.
GY95956. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber II 2384; Houghton CSE 725; Babelon Rois 1467; BMC Seleucid p. 92, 6; HGC 9 1288k (R2), gVF, well centered, dark old cabinet toning, old scratches, light deposits, weight 15.977 g, maximum diameter 29.2 mm, die axis 0o, Sidon (Saida, Lebanon) mint, 2nd reign, 113 - 112 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Antiochos right; reverse Athena standing left, Nike in right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield, spear behind, BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIOXOY in two lines downward on right, ΦIΛO−ΠATOPOΣ downward on left, ΣI∆Ω/IEP / AΣY in 3 lines over outer left, Σ (year 200) in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; very rare; $700.00 (€644.00)


Seleukid Kingdom, Demetrius II Nikator, 146 - 138 and 129 - 125 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Demetrius| |II| |Nikator,| |146| |-| |138| |and| |129| |-| |125| |B.C.|NEW
Demetrius II ruled for two periods, separated by years of captivity in Parthia. He gained the throne with the help of Egypt, but general Diodotus rebelled, took Antioch and made Antiochus VI Dionysus his puppet king. Demetrius then ruled part of the kingdom from Seleucia. In 38 B.C. he attacked the Parthians but was defeated and captured, ending his first reign. The Parthians released him in 129 B.C. when his brother, Antiochus VII Sidetes, marched against Parthia. They hoped the brothers would fight a civil war but the Parthians soon defeated Sidetes, and Demetrius returned to rule Syria. His second reign portraits show him wearing a Parthian styled beard. His second reign ended when he was defeated and killed by yet another usurper set up by Egypt, Alexander II Zabinas.
SH95958. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber II 2195.1b; Newell Tyre 156; SNG Spaer 2218; BMC Seleucids p. 76, 1; HGC 9 1122, VF, dark old cabinet toning, areas of light corrosion, reverse a little rough, weight 13.333 g, maximum diameter 27.8 mm, die axis 0o, Tyre mint, 130 - 129 B.C.; obverse diademed and draped bust right; reverse ∆HMHTPIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, eagle standing left on ship's ram, palm frond under wing, A over PE above (Tyre monogram) over club left, AVΣ monogram over ΓΠP (year 183) right, FP monogram between eagle's legs; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $180.00 (€165.60)


Seleukid Kingdom, Seleukos IV Philopater, 187 - 175 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Seleukos| |IV| |Philopater,| |187| |-| |175| |B.C.|NEW
Seleucus IV Philopator ruled Syria (then including Cilicia and Judea), Mesopotamia, Babylonia and Nearer Iran (Media and Persia). To help pay the heavy war-indemnity exacted by Rome, he sent his minister Heliodorus to Jerusalem to seize the Jewish temple treasury. On his return, Heliodorus assassinated Seleucus, and seized the throne for himself.
GY95971. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber II 1313.6b, Newell SMA 38, SNG Spaer 839, HGC 9 580e, VF, high relief portrait, dark old cabinet toning, marks, scratches, spots of corrosion, weight 16.434 g, maximum diameter 29.6 mm, die axis 30o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 187 - 175 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Seleucus IV right, fillet border; reverse Apollo seated left on omphalos, examining arrow in right hand, resting left hand on grounded bow behind, BAΣIΛEΩΣ (king) downward on right, ΣEΛEYKOY downward on left, palm frond tied with ribbons outer left, Φ in exergue; ex Errett Bishop Collection; $300.00 (€276.00)


Seleukid Kingdom, Seleukos IV Philopater, 187 - 175 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Seleukos| |IV| |Philopater,| |187| |-| |175| |B.C.|NEW
Seleucus IV Philopator ruled Syria (then including Cilicia and Judea), Mesopotamia, Babylonia and Nearer Iran (Media and Persia). To help pay the heavy war-indemnity exacted by Rome, he sent his minister Heliodorus to Jerusalem to seize the Jewish temple treasury. On his return, Heliodorus assassinated Seleucus, and seized the throne for himself.
GY96473. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber II 1313.6b, Newell SMA 38, SNG Spaer 839, HGC 9 580e, VF, silver encrustations, porosity/corrosion, bumps and marks, edge crack, edge chip, weight 16.147 g, maximum diameter 28.0 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 187 - 175 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Seleucus IV right, fillet border; reverse Apollo seated left on omphalos, examining arrow in right hand, resting left hand on grounded bow behind, BAΣIΛEΩΣ (king) downward on right, ΣEΛEYKOY downward on left, wreath tied with ribbons and palm frond outer left, Φ in exergue; ex Leu Numismatik web auction 11 (22 Feb 2020), lot 1063; $160.00 (€147.20)


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus III the Great, 223 - 187 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Antiochus| |III| |the| |Great,| |223| |-| |187| |B.C.|NEW
At the age of eighteen, Antiochus III inherited a disorganized state. Much of Anatolia had been lost and the easternmost provinces had revolted and broken away. After some initial defeats, Antiochus took Judaea from Ptolemaic Egypt and then conquered Anatolia, earning him the epithet "the Great." In 192 B.C. Antiochus invaded Greece with a 10,000-man army, and was elected the commander in chief of the Aetolian League. In 191 B.C., however, the Romans routed him at Thermopylae, forcing him to withdraw to Anatolia. The Romans followed up by invading Anatolia and defeating him again. By the Treaty of Apamea 188 B.C., Antiochus abandoned all territory north and west of the Taurus, most of which the Roman Republic gave either to Rhodes or to the Attalid ruler Eumenes II, its allies. Many Greek cities were left free. As a consequence of this blow to the Seleucid power, the provinces which had recovered by Antiochus, reasserted their independence. Antiochus mounted a fresh eastern expedition. He died while pillaging a temple of Bel at Elymaïs, Persia, in 187 B.C.
GY96476. Silver tetradrachm, SNG Spaer 730 (same dies); Houghton-Lorber I 1115c; Mørkholm AA XXXVI p. 130, 15; Newell WSM 877; HGC 9 447z (S), VF, high relief portrait, many tiny wedge shaped punches, light marks and scratches, weight 16.690 g, maximum diameter 28.8 mm, die axis 0o, E. Syria or N. Mesopotamia, ΠA mint, c. 204 - 197 B.C.; obverse Antiochos diademed head right, middle aged portrait with receding hairline, fillet border; reverse Apollo naked seated left on omphalos, examining arrow in right hand, resting left hand on bow grounded behind, right foot drawn back, BAΣIΛEΩΣ (king) downward on right, ANTIO-XOY downward on left, ΠA monogram upper inner left, N⅃ monogram upper inner right; ex Leu Numismatik web auction 12 (10 Oct 2020), lot 2002 (part of); $280.00 (€257.60)


Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D., Flaviopolis, Cilicia

|Cilicia|, |Domitian,| |13| |September| |81| |-| |18| |September| |96| |A.D.,| |Flaviopolis,| |Cilicia|NEW
Flaviopolis was founded in 74 A.D. by Vespasian, as part of an imperial program for the urbanization of the Cilician Plain. Until then the rural hinterland, as well as the city of Anazarbos, was probably administered by the Tracondimotid dynasty from Hieropolis Castabala. Some mosaic floors, inscriptions, and building blocks have been found at Kadirli, and a 6th century church has been excavated. Flaviopolis was bishopric of Cilicia Secunda in the Christian era.
RB96500. Bronze AE 23, RPC II 1758; SNG BnF 2167; SNG Levante 1530; SNG Cop 135; SNGvA 8670; SNG Hunterian 2376; BMC Lycaonia p. 78, 2; Lindgren-Kovacs 1494, F, dark green patina, light earthen deposits, a little rough/porous, slightly off center, weight 7.180 g, maximum diameter 23.1 mm, die axis 0o, Flaviopolis (Kadirli, Turkey) mint, fall 89 - fall 90 A.D.; obverse ∆OMETIANOC KAICAP, laureate head right; reverse ETOYC ZI (year 17) ΦΛAVIOΠOΛEITΩN, turreted and veiled Tyche seated right on throne, two stalks of grain in her right hand, half-length figure of river god Pyramus swimming right at her feet, his head turned facing ; ex CNG e-auction 463 (11 Mar 2020), lot 210; $80.00 (€73.60)


Mexico City, Mexico, Spanish Colonial America, Philip IV, 31 March 1621 - 17 September 1665

|Mexico|, |Mexico| |City,| |Mexico,| |Spanish| |Colonial| |America,| |Philip| |IV,| |31| |March| |1621| |-| |17| |September| |1665|NEW
This coin was struck at the same time time the first English colonies were established in North America.
WO97095. Silver 8 reales, Calicó y Trigo 1296 - 1318, KM Spain 38, SCWC KM45, F, legends off flan/unstruck, bumps and marks, irregular flan shape (typical for the type), weight 27.486 g, maximum diameter 41.2 mm, die axis 45o, oM mintmark, Mexico City mint, assayer D, 1621 - 1634; obverse PHILIPVS IIII DEIG (off flan), crowned arms of Spain, O/M/D left; reverse Jerusalem Cross with two castles and two lions in quarters, all inside a quatrefoil design; ex Numismatik Naumann auction 92 (2 Aug 2020), lot 1140; $400.00 (€368.00)


Valerian I, October 253 - c. June 260 A.D.

|Valerian| |I|, |Valerian| |I,| |October| |253| |-| |c.| |June| |260| |A.D.|NEW
This ironic reverse utterly failed to foresee Valerian's fate. In 260 A.D., after four years of great losses in battle and to plague, Valerian arranged for talks. He set off with a small group to discuss terms with the Sasanian (Parthian) Emperor Shapur but was never seen again. The date of his death is unknown. In Rome, it was rumored that Shapur used his stuffed body as a footstool.
MA95651. Billon antoninianus, Göbl MIR 111b, RIC V 117, RSC IV 183, Hunter IV 23, SRCV V 9968, aVF, well centered, struck with a worn reverse die, weight 3.505 g, maximum diameter 21.1 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 255 - 256 A.D.; obverse IMP C P LIC VALERIANVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse RESTITVT ORBIS (to the restorer of the world), Valerian standing left, holding spear and raising female (Orbis Terrarum) kneeling to right; $70.00 (€64.40)




  







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