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Ancient Roman Coins

The Handbook of Roman Imperial Coins

|Special| |-| |Handbook| |of| |Roman| |Coins|, |The| |Handbook| |of| |Roman| |Imperial| |Coins|
First published in 1991, Van Meter's Handbook of Roman Imperial Coins (HRIC) quickly became a cult classic among collectors. In 1999, used copies were trading in excess of $100 on eBay. This was no surprise, really..the book remains the most comprehensive, and yet easy-to-use one-volume reference on Roman Imperial Coins! With over 330 large-format pages, and 1000 illustrations, the HRIC provides the collector with both an expansive overview of the history of the coinage, and a particularly thorough catalogue of the coin types. Numerous charts, tables, and a lexicon make identifying, attributing and understanding your coins a pleasure. This book is quite simply the best value in reference literature on Roman Imperial coins!

SPECIAL OFFER! Order The Handbook of Roman Imperial Coins and a coin at the same time - $10 will be automatically deducted from your order at checkout!
BKBHRIC. Handbook of Roman Imperial Coins by David Van Meter, $34.95 (33.20)


Coin Hoards From Roman Britain X

|Roman| |Coin| |Books|, |Coin| |Hoards| |From| |Roman| |Britain| |X|
Hoards in the volume include a unique group of 110 plated denarii from northern Suffolk, a rare hoard of second-century gold aurei from Didcot, Oxfordshire, and a late fourth-century hoard of nearly seven-and-a-half thousand coins from Bishops Cannings, Wiltshire.
BK10529. Coin Hoards From Roman Britain X edited by Roger Bland & John Orna-Ornstein, British Museum Press, 1997, 480 pages, 48 plates, hard cover, includes dust jacket, priced at FORVM's cost! ; $50.00 SALE PRICE $25.00


Coin Hoards From Roman Britain Volume XI

|Roman| |Coin| |Books|, |Coin| |Hoards| |From| |Roman| |Britain| |Volume| |XI|
The eleventh volume, is dedicated to finds of Roman hoards from the early imperial period (with terminal dates up to AD 235) discovered between 1997 and 2001. The highlight of the volume is the Shapwick Villa (Somerset) hoard of over 9,000 denarii, the largest hoard of its kind from Britain to be fully published. It is complemented by an important essay on hoards of the Severan period from Britain by Richard Abdy and Roger Bland.
BK10551. Coin Hoards From Roman Britain Volume XI edited by Richard Abdy, Ian Leins, and Jonathan Williams, Royal Numismatic Society Special Publication No. 36, 2002, 223 pages, 10 plates, new, shelf-worn, priced at FORVM's cost!; $30.00 SALE PRICE $25.00


Coin Circulation in the Danubian And Balkan Provinces of the Roman Empire A.D. 294 - 578

|Roman| |Coin| |Books|, |Coin| |Circulation| |in| |the| |Danubian| |And| |Balkan| |Provinces| |of| |the| |Roman| |Empire| |A.D.| |294| |-| |578|
Please note that for orders shipped outside the USA, the shopping cart shipping charges may be too low if you order larger heavy books. We may ask for additional payment to cover the actual cost of postage. If the actual cost of postage is too high, we will understand if you cancel the order.
BK10035. Coin Circulation in the Danubian And Balkan Provinces of the Roman Empire AD 294 - 578 by G.L. Duncan, Royal Numismatic Society, Special Publication No. 26, 1993, 4to, red cloth hardback with dust jacket. xiv, 192 pages, maps, tables, NEW, priced at FORVM's cost!; $27.00 SALE PRICE $20.00


Wheaton College Collection of Greek and Roman Coins

|Numismatic| |Books|, |Wheaton| |College| |Collection| |of| |Greek| |and| |Roman| |Coins|
Published by the American Numismatic Society, this volume publishes the collection of Wheaton College in a format similar to SNG.
BK09881. Wheaton College Collection of Greek and Roman Coins by J. David Bishop and R. Ross Holloway, hardback, 32 pages plus 32 plates, priced BELOW FORVM's cost!; $5.00 SALE PRICE $2.50


Severus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D., Ephesos, Ionia

|Ephesos|, |Severus| |Alexander,| |13| |March| |222| |-| |March| |235| |A.D.,| |Ephesos,| |Ionia||AE| |36|
See this type online:
RPC Online VI
Asia Minor Coins
ANS Mantis (No photo on ANS, but photo of this specimen is available on RPC Online.)
SH87621. Bronze AE 36, Karwiese MvE 5.2 p. 164, 750b (O3/R3, only 1 spec. of this variety); RPC Online VI T4956 (5 spec.); ANS Mantis 1972.185.5, Choice EF, excellent centering, olive green patina, some legend weak, small flaw/punch on reverse, porous, weight 25.344 g, maximum diameter 36.3 mm, die axis 180o, Ephesos mint, 13 Mar 222 - Mar 235 A.D.; obverse AYT K M AYP CEB AΛEΞAN∆POC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse M-ONΩN - ΠPΩTΩN - ACIAC, on left: cult statue of Artemis standing facing, wearing ornate kalathos, flanked on each side by a stag, arms with supports; on right: Demeter enthroned left, wreathed in grain, two stalks of grain in right hand, long torch vertical in left hand; EΦECIΩN in exergue; only the second known of this variety with stags flanking Artemis, fantastic HUGE 36mm provincial bronze!; $1900.00 (1805.00)


Judaea, Bar Kochba Revolt, 132 - 135 A.D.

|Bar| |Kochba|, |Judaea,| |Bar| |Kochba| |Revolt,| |132| |-| |135| |A.D.||AE| |25|
After the defeat of Bar Kochba rebellion, Judea would not be a center of Jewish religious, cultural, or political life again until the modern era, although Jews continued to sporadically populate it and important religious developments still took place there. Galilee became an important center of Rabbinic Judaism, where the Jerusalem Talmud was compiled in the 4th-5th centuries. In the aftermath of the defeat, the maintenance of Jewish settlement in Palestine became a major concern of the rabbinate. The Sages endeavored to halt Jewish dispersal, and even banned emigration from Palestine, branding those who settled outside its borders as idolaters.
JD99308. Bronze AE 25, Mildenberg 112 (O10/R76); SNG ANS 570 - 572 (same dies); cf. BMC Palestine p. 307, 31; Sofaer 144; Meshorer TJC 292a; Hendin 6464, gVF, dark green patina, light earthen deposits, weight 10.201 g, maximum diameter 24.5 mm, die axis 180o, year 3, 134 - 135 A.D.; obverse paleo-Hebrew inscription: "Shimon", seven branched palm tree with two bunches of dates; reverse paleo-Hebrew inscription: "for the freedom of Jerusalem", five-lobed vine-leaf with strongly accentuated ribs, hanging from curved branch, short tendril right; from a private collector in New Jersey; $1100.00 (1045.00)


Judaea, Bar Kochba Revolt, 132 - 135 A.D.

|Bar| |Kochba|, |Judaea,| |Bar| |Kochba| |Revolt,| |132| |-| |135| |A.D.||AE| |25|
The Bar Kokhba revolt, led by Simon bar Kokhba, was the last of the major JewishRoman wars. The Roman army suffered heavy losses. It took six full legions, auxiliaries, and elements from as many as six more legions three years to crush the revolt. The Romans annihilated much of the Judean population. In 134, the they captured Jerusalem and Simon bar Kokhba was killed in 135. Legio VI Ferrata rebuilt the legionary fortress in Jerusalem and constructed a Roman temple at Golgotha. An altar to Jupiter was erected on the site of the Temple. The Jewish diaspora began as Hadrian barred Jews from Jerusalem and had survivors of the massacre dispersed across the Roman Empire. Many were sold into slavery. The Jewish people remained scattered without a homeland for close to two millennia.
JD99310. Bronze AE 25, Mildenberg 53 (O3/R18); cf. BMC Palestine p. 308, 48; Sofaer 70; Meshorer TJC p. 250, 260; Hendin 6436, VF, well centered, green patina, highlighting earthen deposits, small edge split, weight 9.563 g, maximum diameter 25.4 mm, die axis 180o, year 2, 133 - 134 A.D.; obverse Paleo-Hebrew inscription: "S-M/A" (abbreviating Simon), seven branched palm tree with two bunches of dates; reverse Paleo-Hebrew inscription: "Year 2 of the freedom of Israel", vine leaf on tendril; from a private collector in New Jersey; $1000.00 (950.00)


Judaea, Bar Kochba Revolt, 132 - 135 A.D.

|Bar| |Kochba|, |Judaea,| |Bar| |Kochba| |Revolt,| |132| |-| |135| |A.D.||AE| |27|
After the defeat of Bar Kochba rebellion, Judea would not be a center of Jewish religious, cultural, or political life again until the modern era, although Jews continued to sporadically populate it and important religious developments still took place there. Galilee became an important center of Rabbinic Judaism, where the Jerusalem Talmud was compiled in the 4th-5th centuries. In the aftermath of the defeat, the maintenance of Jewish settlement in Palestine became a major concern of the rabbinate. The Sages endeavored to halt Jewish dispersal, and even banned emigration from Palestine, branding those who settled outside its borders as idolaters.
JD99312. Bronze AE 27, Mildenberg 132 (O10/R96); cf. Meshorer TJC 292a; BMC Palestine p. 312, 80; SNG ANS 572; Hendin 6464, gVF, green patina, earthen deposits, slightly off center, weight 8.558 g, maximum diameter 26.7 mm, die axis 180o, year 3, 134 - 135 A.D.; obverse paleo-Hebrew inscription: "Shimon", seven branched palm tree with two bunches of dates; reverse paleo-Hebrew inscription: "for the freedom of Jerusalem", five-lobed vine-leaf with strongly accentuated ribs, hanging from curved branch, short tendril right; from a private collector in New Jersey; $1000.00 (950.00)


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D.

|Nero|, |Nero,| |13| |October| |54| |-| |9| |June| |68| |A.D.||sestertius|
A decursio was a military exercise, by which Roman soldiers were taught to make long marches in a given time, under arms and without quitting their ranks. They sometimes consisted of a mock fight between two divisions. Augustus and subsequently Hadrian ordered that the infantry and cavalry were to march out three times a month ten miles from the camp and ten miles back, fully armed and equipped. Decursio on this coin probably refers Nero's participation in mock military maneuvers in the circus.
SL99914. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC I 165, BMCRE I 148; Cayon 125, Cohen I 91, SRCV I 1957 var. (riders right), Hunter I -, ANACS (7375269, in holder, authenticated only, no grade on holder, corroded, says Lugdunum mint in error), maximum diameter 34 mm, die axis 210o, Rome mint, 64 A.D.; obverse NERO CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG GER P M TR P IMP P P, laureate head right, bearded, wearing aegis; reverse Nero on horseback prancing right, wearing cuirass, short tunic, and billowing cloak, couched spear in right hand; on his far side and a half horse-length behind, soldier on horseback prancing right, holding vexillum over shoulder in right hand, spear in left hand, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking above center, DECVRSIO in exergue; ANACS| Verify; rare; $950.00 (902.50)




  







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